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tom-selleck
06-17-2005, 07:04 PM
had a few questions tonight in a practice doubles match.

unintentional double hits o.k. - i think i looked this up, and was surprised that they are OK.

hitting ball on other side of net i.e. on overhead.... my fellow players thought it's ok. surprises me that this is the case but i think they are right.... but racquet and body can't touch the net???

are those first two correct???

lastly, not a rules questions so much....... but can any of the 4 players in doubles call the serve out including the server???? how do people work that out?

what was that document that people suggested?? it was really good.......... was it called "the rules of tennis"?? although some of it was definitely how to conduct yourself.... just can't remember the name.

thanks as always in advance.

benasp
06-17-2005, 07:41 PM
I have a rule question too,

If a made a perfect drop shot with a lots of backspin and a little help of the wind and it land on the other side and come back in my side...

What the rule for that ??? do i have to hit it back or i win the point cause the other havn't touched the ball

very rare but this is possible

theace21
06-17-2005, 08:33 PM
Once a ball break the plane of the net you can hit it, and you can follow thru over the net as long as your or your racket don't touch the net...

The only exception is the question from Ben...If the ball hits one your side and spins back over the next you can reach over the net and make contact with the ball.

rumstove
06-17-2005, 11:24 PM
I have a rule question too,

If a made a perfect drop shot with a lots of backspin and a little help of the wind and it land on the other side and come back in my side...

What the rule for that ??? do i have to hit it back or i win the point cause the other havn't touched the ball

very rare but this is possible

Actually this type of question was asked and answered in the June 2004 issue of TENNIS magazine, page 96, I presume by Tony Lance. Basically the answer says (I'll paraphrase here) you should ask "Who was the last person to successfully return the ball?" Even though the ball ended up on your side, your opponent didn't successfully return the ball into play. This means you win the point.

The article did not mention which rule this explanation falls under so I can't tell you. It does mention that "answers are based on the ITF Rules of Tennis and USTA's The Code" at the bottom of the page.

Tennis Ball Hitter
06-18-2005, 12:39 AM
[QUOTE=tom-selleck] lastly, not a rules questions so much....... but can any of the 4 players in doubles call the serve out including the server???? how do people work that out?
[QUOTE]

well if you serve it and you or your partner call it out ... don't think anyones going to complain :) . Although I do get annoyed when my partner calls my serve out [maybe I am just a bit of a cheat].

However, not sure about the returners partner. Usually I call the serves if my partner is receiving and he calls the serves when I return. But we have been called on it a couple of times when I thought the ball was in and played it and my partner called it out [he had a better view ... especially on serves that go a bit long]. Not sure what the rule is there.

This was the answer from a previous thread:
You may hit a ball only if it is on your side of the court. However, the follow through of the racquet may break the plane of the net. The EXCEPTION is when the ball bounces on your side and spins backover the net, then you are allowed to hit the ball on your opponents side of the court.

AND you may never touch the net or the opponents court while the ball is in play. It is out of play when the ball hits the back fence or has bounced twice.

papa
06-18-2005, 05:15 AM
had a few questions tonight in a practice doubles match.

unintentional double hits o.k. - i think i looked this up, and was surprised that they are OK.

hitting ball on other side of net i.e. on overhead.... my fellow players thought it's ok. surprises me that this is the case but i think they are right.... but racquet and body can't touch the net???

are those first two correct???

lastly, not a rules questions so much....... but can any of the 4 players in doubles call the serve out including the server???? how do people work that out?

what was that document that people suggested?? it was really good.......... was it called "the rules of tennis"?? although some of it was definitely how to conduct yourself.... just can't remember the name.

thanks as always in advance.

Well, lets take a look.

Double hit is ok as long as its unintentional and in one continous stroke - in other words you can't mis-hit and then hit it again.

Player has to hit the ball on his/her side of the net but the racquet can break the vertical plane of the net - or in other words, the racquet follow through can go over the net as long as it doesn't touch the net or anything like the post, strap, etc. Once the ball is called "out", hits a fixed item on or near the court, or bounces twice, the point is OVER and any contact with the net is inmaterial.

So the first two were correct.

Third one is that any player can make a call - we're all equals. The idea, spirit, is to get the calls right. Unless asked by the opponents or on the serve, you only make calls on your side of the net.

And lastly we have "The Rules of Tennis" and "The Code" along with "Rules of Wheelchair Tennis" and various "Amendaments to the Rules of Tennis". Most of the time all of these are included in one publication called "Official Rules of Tennis".

Hope this answers your questions.

tom-selleck
06-18-2005, 06:06 AM
Third one is that any player can make a call - we're all equals. The idea, spirit, is to get the calls right. Unless asked by the opponents or on the serve, you only make calls on your side of the net.


papa and others, thank you very much!

am i "stupid" to call my serve when no one else does??? .... frankly, it doesn't happen that often but when it does i think "how many other people would do this???"....

seems like my singles and doubles matches still have a fair number points where there's alot of hesitation after a close serve. seems like people either aren't good at seeing serves out (to their own detriment, and sometimes it's obvious) or aren't forceful enough.

Rickson
06-18-2005, 06:46 AM
You're allowed to reach over the net if the ball has already bounced, that's perfectly legal. You may not touch the net ever with any part of you or your racquet. You are not allowed to reach over the net while the ball is in flight. If the ball has not crossed the net yet, you can't touch it but because a ball that bounced has already reached your side, you can reach as far as you want over the net, as long as you don't touch the net.

tom-selleck
06-18-2005, 06:56 AM
You're allowed to reach over the net if the ball has already bounced, that's perfectly legal. You may not touch the net ever with any part of you or your racquet. You are not allowed to reach over the net while the ball is in flight. If the ball has not crossed the net yet, you can't touch it but because a ball that bounced has already reached your side, you can reach as far as you want over the net, as long as you don't touch the net.

my question was more about a volleyball spike, i.e. you see the ball coming and get way up and hit past the net.... from the other posts, i understand it's illegal.

Rickson
06-18-2005, 07:07 AM
my question was more about a volleyball spike, i.e. you see the ball coming and get way up and hit past the net.... from the other posts, i understand it's illegal.
You can reach over the net and spike the ball only if the ball has crossed the net. There are many borderline net crossing volleys, even in the pro ranks, but they're usually not called, but if your racquet touches the ball clearly before it's even close to your side of the net, that's illegal and you lose the point. In other words, you can't reach over the net to hit the ball on the fly, but you can reach over the net on your followthrough, that's perfecly legal.

SageOfDeath
06-18-2005, 07:45 AM
I have a rule question too,

If a made a perfect drop shot with a lots of backspin and a little help of the wind and it land on the other side and come back in my side...

What the rule for that ??? do i have to hit it back or i win the point cause the other havn't touched the ball

very rare but this is possible

According to tennisserver you win the point because you hit the ball and the ball bounced twice.

This seems pretty fair to me because those perfect drop shots are really rare and why should you be penalized with having to hit that ball when you are the one who made such a great shot!

Rickson
06-18-2005, 07:58 AM
I've done this shot to my opponent before and he didn't even know the ball had gone to his side before it went back over. I told him he lost the point and it was my turn to serve. If the opponent had rushed the net and simply put his racquet, any part of it, frame, strings, etc. on the ball, he would have gotten the point. The opponent can even reach clearly over the other side as long as he never touches the net.

papa
06-18-2005, 08:36 AM
According to tennisserver you win the point because you hit the ball and the ball bounced twice.

This seems pretty fair to me because those perfect drop shots are really rare and why should you be penalized with having to hit that ball when you are the one who made such a great shot!

Yes, if the ball bounces the point is over - however, if it bounces on the opponents side and then, generally because of spin or the wind, the ball is headed back to your side, he/she has to touch the ball before it lands - just as Rickson said. Its a fairly rare shot but it does happen.

Smashlob
06-18-2005, 11:41 AM
Third one is that any player can make a call - we're all equals. The idea, spirit, is to get the calls right. Unless asked by the opponents or on the serve, you only make calls on your side of the net.


Actually, this is incomplete. You CANNOT call a first serve against yourself, however, you CAN call any other shot that you hit, out. I can't see why you would want to, but whatever.

papa
06-18-2005, 02:42 PM
Actually, this is incomplete. You CANNOT call a first serve against yourself, however, you CAN call any other shot that you hit, out. I can't see why you would want to, but whatever.

Well, if we really want to be technical here, neither the server or his partner can call the first serve "out". This actually is in "The Code" and not in the "Rules of Tennis". Its because the receiver might be giving the server the benifit of doubt on a close call. So Smashlob is correct.

DVanTongeren
06-19-2005, 06:36 PM
ok so i have a question.

if you hit a drop shot that bounces back over the net, your opponent is allowed to reach over the net and hit it before it bounces. He cannot however, make contact with you or your racquet. Can you then touch his racquet and claim the point?

papa
06-20-2005, 09:36 AM
The player taking/hitting the ball on your side of the net cannot create a hindrence for your return no more than you can block him from reaching over the net in the situation described. Same thing on any shot where the racquet passes over the vertical plane on the follow through - just can't touch the opponents racquet or him. He's entitled to do these things so if you touch him/racquet/clothing you would be the one to lose the point.

Rickson
06-20-2005, 10:09 AM
ok so i have a question.

if you hit a drop shot that bounces back over the net, your opponent is allowed to reach over the net and hit it before it bounces. He cannot however, make contact with you or your racquet. Can you then touch his racquet and claim the point?
Absolutely not. Remember, it's tough enough for the guy to avoid the net. If you touch his racquet, you'll lose the point, but if you can get to the ball and you hit him with the ball while his arm is hanging over your side, you'd win the point.

SageOfDeath
06-20-2005, 05:33 PM
hehe make sure you get him really hard with the ball because sometimes they try to run away. And when you do DON"T laugh pretend it was a TOTAL accident and be like i'm so sorry are you ok??

I have a question about rules too.... Is there a rule about how long a ball can stay on a racquet? Suppose that your opponent hits a lob and you soft catch it can you run to the net and just drop the ball off your racquet let it bounce twice and then win the point?

Rickson
06-20-2005, 05:58 PM
hehe make sure you get him really hard with the ball because sometimes they try to run away. And when you do DON"T laugh pretend it was a TOTAL accident and be like i'm so sorry are you ok??

I have a question about rules too.... Is there a rule about how long a ball can stay on a racquet? Suppose that your opponent hits a lob and you soft catch it can you run to the net and just drop the ball off your racquet let it bounce twice and then win the point?
No way! You can't catch the ball, walk it over, then dump it where you want to.

Tennis Ball Hitter
06-20-2005, 10:00 PM
oobviously you cant do that, but what rule handles that situation?

Tennis Ball Hitter
06-20-2005, 11:25 PM
The ball is allowed to hit the net post as if it is a part of the net. I have seen it happen in pro comp before, can't think of who it was though. I am not sure what the ruling is if it were a serve but logic tells me that it would be counted as a let [as long as the ball goes into the service box].

papa
06-21-2005, 04:09 AM
The ball is allowed to hit the net post as if it is a part of the net. I have seen it happen in pro comp before, can't think of who it was though. I am not sure what the ruling is if it were a serve but logic tells me that it would be counted as a let [as long as the ball goes into the service box].

Well, in singles, if it hits the "singles sticks" and stays in that would be a good return. The portion of the net and post "outside" the singles sticks are considered permanent fixtures and if the ball hits these, its out.

Tennis Ball Hitter
06-21-2005, 05:02 AM
I did a bit of googling because I am almost certain that I saw a player win a point after it hit the net post.

I found these:
http://www.tennisserver.com/wildcards/wildcards_98_3.html

QUESTION "I have heard that: (a) a ball can hit the net post and bounce in and still be "in", "

ANSWER "(a) Rule 24 (a) states that a return is good "if the ball touches the net, posts, (etc.)... provided that it passes over any of them and hits the ground within the Court." By the way, if it shot was a serve and hits the net post, it is considered a fault in this situation, but if it hits the net, strap or band it is considered a let." I also Found this interesting ruling [at the same site].

QUESTION "What happens if the ball goes between a gap situated between net and net post - is this ball still "in"?"

ANSWER: Again, the answer depends on whether you are playing singles or doubles. The ITF notes as a comment to Rule 24 that "a return that passes under the net cord between the single stick and adjacent doubles post without touching either net cord, net, or doubles post and falls within the court, is a good return." But the USTA comments that "In doubles, this would be a 'through' -- loss of point."so what happens in singles when there are no single sticks and just the gap?

I also found this, it makes sense ... I geuss
http://www.tennis.info/StumpDetail.asp?id=36
"In a singles match played with a doubles net and singles sticks, the net posts and the part of the net outside the singles sticks are permanent fixtures and are not considered as net posts or part of the net." So, a player touching the 'net' outside of the singles sticks is touching a permanent fixture - not the net - and is not subject to a penalty. So I geuss that means if you have singles sticks you cannot hit the post. But if you don't have singles sticks you can hit the post?

papa
06-21-2005, 10:01 AM
I did a bit of googling because I am almost certain that I saw a player win a point after it hit the net post.

I found these:
http://www.tennisserver.com/wildcards/wildcards_98_3.html

I also Found this interesting ruling [at the same site].

so what happens in singles when there are no single sticks and just the gap?

I also found this, it makes sense ... I geuss
http://www.tennis.info/StumpDetail.asp?id=36
So I geuss that means if you have singles sticks you cannot hit the post. But if you don't have singles sticks you can hit the post?

Yes, all this stuff is correct. What you might have seen is a match played with a "singles" net where the posts are in the doubles alley. In a singles match played on a doubles court (with a doubles net and posts), everything outside the singles sticks is considered a permanent fixture and thus if a ball strikes anything (including that portion of the net outside the "sticks" the doubles posts, cable, etc, is considered "out".

SageOfDeath
06-22-2005, 07:10 AM
No way! You can't catch the ball, walk it over, then dump it where you want to.

well that's what I assumed but is there a certain rule that handles that? Like what part of the rulebook does doing that violate???

papa
06-22-2005, 10:20 AM
well that's what I assumed but is there a certain rule that handles that? Like what part of the rulebook does doing that violate???

Well, its covered in both the "Rules of Tennis" and also in "The Code"

In the Rules of Tennis sec. 24 "Player Loses Point" "The point is lost if: sec e. The player diliberately carries or catches the ball in play on the racket or diliberately touches it with the racket more than once;"

Also "USTA Comment 24.5" "Does a player lose a point if the ball hits his racket twice during one swing? No. Onlhy when there is a definite and deliberate "second push" by the player does the shot become illegal. "Deliberately" is the key word in this rule. Two hits occuring during a single continuous swing are not deemed a double hit."

In the Rules of Tennis sec. 26 "Hindrance", "USTA Comment 26.1" "What is the difference between a deliberate act and an unintentional act? Deliberate means a player did what the player intended to do, even if the result was unintended."

The catching of a ball, with the racquet, hand, hat, etc. is also covered in the Rules of Tennis and The Code.

Hope this helps.

VarsityBaby
06-22-2005, 02:18 PM
had a few questions tonight in a practice doubles match.

unintentional double hits o.k. - i think i looked this up, and was surprised that they are OK.

hitting ball on other side of net i.e. on overhead.... my fellow players thought it's ok. surprises me that this is the case but i think they are right.... but racquet and body can't touch the net???

are those first two correct???

lastly, not a rules questions so much....... but can any of the 4 players in doubles call the serve out including the server???? how do people work that out?

what was that document that people suggested?? it was really good.......... was it called "the rules of tennis"?? although some of it was definitely how to conduct yourself.... just can't remember the name.

thanks as always in advance.

As long as you and your racquet don't hit the net your fine.
As for who can call the serves, in my league (Highschool WYL) if we are playing doubles whoever the ball is being served to calls it and if you or your partner think they called it wrong then you can call that person on it but most of the time it goes to the person who was recieving. And some partners might have rules were as if they are receiving they don't want their partner to say anything because it might mess them up, I had that my first year playing tennis my partner didn't want me to call the serves unless I was receiving. Hope this helps.

tennis-n-sc
06-22-2005, 04:08 PM
Guys and Gals,

You should invest $4.95 + shipping and buy your very own copy of "Friend at Court" which contains all the rules of tennis and The Code. They are nicely divided and sectioned for easy use. The great thing is you don't have to read the entire book. Start with The Code and go to The Rules of Tennis. Don't get hung up in all the sections for officials and tournaments and don't go the ITA and ITF sections. Unless you live outside the U.S. or it's territorial governmets, ITF will not apply. ITA is for college play and it won't apply unless you are in college matches. This cuts the book by about 60% and makes it very easy to read and understand. Go for it.

papa
06-22-2005, 05:30 PM
Guys and Gals,

You should invest $4.95 + shipping and buy your very own copy of "Friend at Court" which contains all the rules of tennis and The Code. They are nicely divided and sectioned for easy use. The great thing is you don't have to read the entire book. Start with The Code and go to The Rules of Tennis. Don't get hung up in all the sections for officials and tournaments and don't go the ITA and ITF sections. Unless you live outside the U.S. or it's territorial governmets, ITF will not apply. ITA is for college play and it won't apply unless you are in college matches. This cuts the book by about 60% and makes it very easy to read and understand. Go for it.

I think this is a great idea. The USTA also has a publication that is under 10 bucks - also there are websites where you can just copy the Rules and Code.