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Cindysphinx
02-27-2011, 08:09 AM
I'll come right out and say it: I don't like greeting cards.

I don't appreciate receiving them. All it means is that the sender went to the drug store, looked around, spent $3.95, wrote their name at the bottom of some mass-produced canned message, and mailed it to me. Or maybe they bought the greeting cards in bulk and send the same card to everyone. It feels so commercial, so canned, so impersonal, so unnecessary. It is also environmentally unfriendly when you consider the manufacture of the card itself and the resources devoted to delivering it to me. A phone call, in comparison, is much more environmentally friendly.

But what really gets me is that a lot of people like greeting cards. They expect them. If you don't send one, they take it badly, even if you called them on Their Special Day and talked with them for 30 minutes. So I wind up trudging to the drugstore and engaging in this pointless ritual. Couldn't I donate the $3.95 to charity and instead pick up the phone and have a nice conversation with the birthday girl instead?

Worse is Greeting Card Creep. It is not enough on Mother's Day for me to send a card to my mother. No, now I have to send one to my mother-in-law and all female siblings and sisters-in-law. Same thing on Valentine's Day.

Am I the only one who feels this way?

Cindy -- who tosses Christmas cards directly into the trash after she opens them because she doesn't like the clutter

Steady Eddy
02-27-2011, 08:39 AM
I feel like you. Fortunately, my wife feels the same way. We honor our own calender of days: the day we met, when adopted out dog, and so on. We don't honor days like Valentine's Day that only exist because of the greeting card industry.

I'm not completely consistent with this, though. My father thinks Father's Day is dumb. He doesn't want cards on Father's Day. But I buy him one anyway because I'm afraid of offending him. :oops: Do you see how I feel?

But I'm with you. I don't like how people pass out cards on birthdays and expect to be congratulated for their wit, just by buying someone else's. Almost anything is more personal than handing out a greeting card.

SuperFly
02-27-2011, 09:05 AM
Greeting cards: helping people look like they give a rat's *** since the mid 1800's.

Sentinel
02-27-2011, 09:18 AM
Why not hand-make some cards and send them to friends ?

In India, we have cards made by CRY (child relief and you) so the money goes to charity. But i agree, better to donate that amount. My folks used to spend a lot of time keeping track of who sent cards last year, and who sent them this year, who only sends return cards etc etc....

GetBetterer
02-27-2011, 09:41 AM
I've had a few friends send me home-made greeting cards (which in my opinion was thoughtful) alongside some people who wrote their own little letter in store bought greeting cards which I thought was also nice.

r2473
02-27-2011, 10:29 AM
It's a chick thing.

To say it makes no sense and is a waste of time and money would just be redundent (obviously).

jswinf
02-27-2011, 10:31 AM
I'm sort of shocked; I thought women were the bastions of the greeting-card industry. Don't you have any special ones tucked away, maybe with a pressed flower, or are you just a heartless jock like us guys?

I do agree about the card "creep." Cards for everything now. And what I HATE are the semi-new noisy ones, that when you open them up they play music or yap at you? Always makes me jump.

Cindysphinx
02-27-2011, 10:38 AM
I'm sort of shocked; I thought women were the bastions of the greeting-card industry. Don't you have any special ones tucked away, maybe with a pressed flower, or are you just a heartless jock like us guys?

I do agree about the card "creep." Cards for everything now. And what I HATE are the semi-new noisy ones, that when you open them up they play music or yap at you? Always makes me jump.

I had a friend who was into art and had developed a line of whimsical cartoon characters. She was thinking of developing the characters into greeting cards.

She had a consultant who used to work for Hallmark, and I was able to hear some of what the greeting card consultant had to say. The consultant got a bunch of this lady's friends together, and we were to be a sounding board/focus group for the concept.

What blew me away was that the consultant said that most women spend a bunch of time (I can't remember how much -- 10 minutes?) selecting each greeting card they send.

What the what? Ten minutes? I consider it a personal goal to spend less than ten seconds.

SteadyEddy, I too prefer to celebrate dates/events that have personal meaning. Better still, I like to do nice things for people out of the clear blue. I read a book that a family member might enjoy and I just up and send them a copy. I see a shirt that would look great on my sister; I buy one for her. Why do we have to do these things on Madison Avenue's schedule?

Cindysphinx
02-27-2011, 10:40 AM
I'm sort of shocked; I thought women were the bastions of the greeting-card industry. Don't you have any special ones tucked away, maybe with a pressed flower, or are you just a heartless jock like us guys?

I do agree about the card "creep." Cards for everything now. And what I HATE are the semi-new noisy ones, that when you open them up they play music or yap at you? Always makes me jump.

I have saved exactly zero manufactured greeting cards.

I have one plastic bin in the basement that holds special little treasures my kids have made over the years. There are probably some hand-made Mothers' Day Cards in there. And I have a lot of my kids' framed art work all over the house.

On account of how it is free, and real art is very expensive. :)

sureshs
02-27-2011, 10:47 AM
www.evite.com

Steady Eddy
02-27-2011, 12:17 PM
What blew me away was that the consultant said that most women spend a bunch of time (I can't remember how much -- 10 minutes?) selecting each greeting card they send.

What the what? Ten minutes? I consider it a personal goal to spend less than ten seconds.

Good for you, but it takes me a long time to find a card. Here's why. I don't want to send someone a birthday card that makes fun of their age. I don't want a long poem. I also don't want one that's for a 5 year old. So I look for a long time, I think I'm not picky, but so many cards are totally inappropriate! Finally I find something, and I'm upset over all the time it took me just to pick out a card. In another week I'll have to pick out like 5 more cards. For what it's worth, it adds up a quite a drain on time and money. :mad:

Greeting card people. Don't make so many birthday cards that try to be "ha ha" clever. Just "Happy Birthday" with a cute cartoon or photo is enough! That's all ya gotta do.

Cindysphinx
02-27-2011, 01:31 PM
I walk up to the section that says, "Birthday -- Mother." I pick up the very first card that appears to have an envelope of the correct size behind it. I scan quickly for the word, "Mother." If these requirements are met, I buy it. I do not read it. Since I feel no attachment to the treacle written inside, this card will do nicely.

I would look at the price and choose on that basis, but that would require me to pull my reading glasses out of my purse.

I would also like to suggest we all do away with the oversized card that we require everyone the person knows to sign. Do we really have to track down every member of the tennis team and have her write something on the card, or can one person just scribble, "From your teammates" at the bottom.

I never know what to write on the Oversize Group Card and have been known to steal the witty greetings of others who have signed before me. Hey, the recipient won't know who the original author of "Thanks for everything!" was, will she?

Cindy -- who might send her mom a birthday card for a 5-year-old just to see if she says anything about it; maybe mom doesn't read them either

jswinf
02-27-2011, 02:03 PM
^^^Be careful--like Eddy says, "modern" cards might say something on the inside like: "On your birthday, why not party all night with the Chippendale Dancers and guzzle tequila 'till your toes get numb. Just lay off the bean dip, you know how you get."

Cindysphinx
02-27-2011, 02:15 PM
What's wrong with that? The recipient of the greeting card should be glad they are getting anything at all! :)

Polaris
02-27-2011, 03:06 PM
I'll come right out and say it: I don't like greeting cards.

I don't appreciate receiving them. All it means is that the sender went to the drug store, looked around, spent $3.95, wrote their name at the bottom of some mass-produced canned message, and mailed it to me. Or maybe they bought the greeting cards in bulk and send the same card to everyone. It feels so commercial, so canned, so impersonal, so unnecessary.

I'm guessing that you feel this way because you have seen too many canned run-of-the-mill cards. I couldn't disagree more. I like to spend time looking for cards in uncommon places - independent bookstores, national park visitor centers. I also like to put my own words in them (like they are small letters) and make my own cards. And fortunately, I have received cards that are genuinely beautiful and the cards themselves are so uncommon (sometimes personally prepared) that you know that the person spent a lot of time thinking about what words and pictures would say it just right.

I'm with you on the stupid by-the-numbers cards. But, don't tarnish greeting cards as a whole. There are really good ones. You just might not have received any good ones in a while. Or, some of the ones you trashed without looking, might have been really good and heartfelt :-|.

It is also environmentally unfriendly when you consider the manufacture of the card itself and the resources devoted to delivering it to me. A phone call, in comparison, is much more environmentally friendly.

There are places where you can buy cards prepared by children who live in orphanages, or by people who work in some cottage industry. You pay more for the cards, so the money actually goes to charity. Yes, a phone call is environmentally friendly, but you burn a lot more of nature's resources by driving a car than by sending a greeting card.


But what really gets me is that a lot of people like greeting cards. They expect them. If you don't send one, they take it badly, even if you called them on Their Special Day and talked with them for 30 minutes. So I wind up trudging to the drugstore and engaging in this pointless ritual. Couldn't I donate the $3.95 to charity and instead pick up the phone and have a nice conversation with the birthday girl instead?

I agree with you there. It is childish to expect to receive a card, or any gift for that matter. Also, sending cards on holidays is a drag. Birthday's are fine, but in general, there ought not to be an explicit festive occasion in order to send a card. One sends a card to person X, because one happens to be thinking about person X at any given time. At least, that's how I think about it.


Am I the only one who feels this way?
Apparently not, from the looks of this thread. But yeah, I do think that you are a little too extreme about greeting cards. Sometimes, I receive a personally written card, or one with a picture or a quote that hints at some shared personal moment from the past. In today's world, these antiquated things are precious, worth treasuring and worth giving to others. It's like writing or receiving a letter. How many people receive handwritten letters nowadays? And how beautiful it would be to know that (a) someone cared enough to sit down and write one to you (b) you care enough to sit down and write one for somebody !

I walk up to the section that says, "Birthday -- Mother." I pick up the very first card that appears to have an envelope of the correct size behind it. I scan quickly for the word, "Mother." If these requirements are met, I buy it. I do not read it. Since I feel no attachment to the treacle written inside, this card will do nicely.
If I feel that way about buying a card, then I don't buy it. I'm past keeping up appearances. Only a few people in our lives deserve personal, beautiful, uncommon cards. For the rest, a timely phone call or an email or a stupidly funny egreeting will do.

Cindysphinx
02-28-2011, 05:02 AM
Hmmm. Well . . . Yes, I sometimes receive cards that look very expensive or pretty. I'm afraid these get the very same treatment as the most generic drug store greeting card. A quick read if the card has a handwritten message in it, and then off to the recycle bin.

There is a reason for this, and it is not dependent on the amount spent on the card or how pretty it is.

I'm reading a non-fiction book right now called "Stuff." It is a book about hoarding. One of the interesting things I learned is that people who hoard save things for a variety of reasons, but the overriding theme seems to be that they attach a lot of emotion to things. They also use things to store their memories, in a way. We all do this to a certain extent, I suppose.

On the continuum of hoarding behavior, I score pretty low. Few things carry intense emotional meaning for me. And of those things, greeting cards come in dead last or close to it.

After all, the greeting card is almost never made by the person sending it. This sets it apart from things my kids made when they were little, for example. It is, no matter how beautiful or unique, something made by a stranger and purchased from a store for a price that is often indicated on the back. What matters is the sentiment, which could just as easily be expressed on a plain sheet of paper, and in a greeting card is also mass-produced.

I think maybe the popularity of greeting cards is due to the way it makes people feel when they buy and send them. I guess this makes sense on some level -- if folks enjoy looking for the perfect greeting card, then that's what they enjoy. The senders of cards perhaps do not fully understand that the recipient may not feel similarly, but the recipients are much too polite to tell the senders this. And so the cycle continues.

But consider it from my end. I go to the mailbox every day, and it is absolutely stuffed with bills and junk mail. I have to go through it daily and pull out the bills. And then there is a greeting card. I stand there over the recycle bin, read it and . . . . then what? Am I supposed to save it? For how long? Where? Into the bin it goes.

I would rather have talked to the person, honestly.

tennytive
02-28-2011, 06:01 AM
As a photographer I made my own cards for years for all occasions. People looked forward to them. It was a lot of work, but I enjoyed it. Now I do so occasionally, but email it instead of printing it and sending it in an envelope. Postage figures in these days as another negative to sending cards.

Lately I've been buying blank cards from Trader Joe's. Beautiful photographs, no sappy greetings, and 99 cents. Easy and more personal to write in whatever greeting suits the occasion. Almost all of my friends receive a call and usually an email instead of a card on their birthdays, but I still buy cards for the immediate family.

As for you, I understand your position, and kudos for realizing that less is more. People save too much junk to the point of letting it take over their lives.

retlod
02-28-2011, 06:18 AM
Sympathy cards for people who we don't know that well are a great use of paper. At a time when unobtrusive communication is probably welcome, I would imagine a little note to let you know that people are thinking of you would go a long way. My group will send a card when a child we have taken care of in the hospital before dies.

angharad
02-28-2011, 06:24 AM
I don't mind a greeting card when it's obvious the person took some time with it - writing a longer letter-length note, making it themselves, etc. The people that mass-purchase cards and send them to everyone for every occasion drive me nuts, though.

Cindysphinx
02-28-2011, 07:26 AM
Sympathy cards for people who we don't know that well are a great use of paper. At a time when unobtrusive communication is probably welcome, I would imagine a little note to let you know that people are thinking of you would go a long way. My group will send a card when a child we have taken care of in the hospital before dies.

When my dog died, my vet sent me a handwritten note. It was on a blank piece of paper, or maybe it was his office stationery. It said just a few words about the loss. I guess I was also a bit surprised and appreciative that he would write to his clients in this way. I was certainly left feeling like I would use his services again.

So it's nice that you guys send something to the parents of a child who died.

I, uh. . . I didn't save the vet's note though.

Cindy -- who feels a little bit bad for slam dunking into the trash Christmas cards with a family photo on them, but really, how can she possibly start saving the family photos of other people's families?

boomer22
02-28-2011, 07:41 AM
My husband doesn't want me to toss the Christmas card photos we receive. What am I going to do with them??? Is it ok to toss them by March - lol???

I don't celebrate Hallmark holidays. I think my husband really appreciates this!

Djokovicfan4life
02-28-2011, 07:48 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47ULR39Ydts

Talker
02-28-2011, 08:16 AM
I'll come right out and say it: I don't like greeting cards.

I don't appreciate receiving them. All it means is that the sender went to the drug store, looked around, spent $3.95, wrote their name at the bottom of some mass-produced canned message, and mailed it to me. Or maybe they bought the greeting cards in bulk and send the same card to everyone. It feels so commercial, so canned, so impersonal, so unnecessary. It is also environmentally unfriendly when you consider the manufacture of the card itself and the resources devoted to delivering it to me. A phone call, in comparison, is much more environmentally friendly.

But what really gets me is that a lot of people like greeting cards. They expect them. If you don't send one, they take it badly, even if you called them on Their Special Day and talked with them for 30 minutes. So I wind up trudging to the drugstore and engaging in this pointless ritual. Couldn't I donate the $3.95 to charity and instead pick up the phone and have a nice conversation with the birthday girl instead?

Worse is Greeting Card Creep. It is not enough on Mother's Day for me to send a card to my mother. No, now I have to send one to my mother-in-law and all female siblings and sisters-in-law. Same thing on Valentine's Day.

Am I the only one who feels this way?

Cindy -- who tosses Christmas cards directly into the trash after she opens them because she doesn't like the clutter

I send cards to my mom on Xmas and easter and birthday.

No one else gets one and no one else expects one.

I only get one card on my birthday and xmas. 2 cards a year(from mom).

My sister stopped sending me cards when she never got one in return, I told her were adults now and don't need such things.

sureshs
02-28-2011, 08:37 AM
I walk up to the section that says, "Birthday -- Mother." I pick up the very first card that appears to have an envelope of the correct size behind it. I scan quickly for the word, "Mother." If these requirements are met, I buy it. I do not read it. Since I feel no attachment to the treacle written inside, this card will do nicely.


These days you also got to be careful that it is not a "naughty" greeting card.

Dedans Penthouse
02-28-2011, 08:55 AM
(for the record: nothing wrong with alternative lifestyles)

Once upon a time, while walking down Park Avenue, a gay man noticed a distinguished, very handsome silver-haired gentleman walking just ahead of him--the gay observer was totally smitten on the spot: it was love at first sight.

So he follows the handsome stranger down the crowded avenue and into a nearby office building. He gets onto the same crowded elevator and gets out on the same floor. He then see the handsome stranger head down the hall and into his office, the front door of which reads: Dr. Smith - Proctologist. The guy thinks to himself: "this is too good to be true!" at which point, he immediately cellphones the doctor's office and schedules an appointment for an examination.

Day of the appointment: the prospective patient is shaking with excitement and anticipation as if he were headed to his first date. He arrives at the office and meets the doctor while swooning to himself: ("oh Gawd, he's even more handsome than I remember!"). The doctor tells him to "drop trow" and bend over the examining table at which point the gay 'patient' can hardly keep his excitement in check. The good doctor "lubes up" and proceeds to rectally examine the guy who is at this point on the brink of an orgasm. The doctor suddenly is struggling with something he's feeling during the exam....he struggles and struggles and finally, he pulls out of the man: a dozen long-stemmed roses!

The doctor, totally flabbergasted exclaims: "Oh my God!!!!...in my 30 years of medicine, I've never come across anything like this!!!" whereupon the patient looks over his shoulder lovingly at the good doctor and excitedly squeals: "Read the card!!!....read the card!!!!"

;-)

Sentinel
02-28-2011, 09:09 AM
^^ Were the roses de-thorned ?

PimpMyGame
02-28-2011, 09:20 AM
I too think cards are BS. My wife recently did an analysis of how much we spend on cards and gifts, the amount is ridiculous. If I'm not going to see them face to face, I would rather call someone and tell them happy birthday or text at least. I have never subscribed to separate cards for grandparents for birthday, Christmas, etc. They get one card from the family. And that's more out of not wanting to hurt their feelings than anything else.

And to my dismay I see that there is now a Grandmother's Day, a Grandfather's Day, and you can even buy a "Bon Voyage" card when your friend goes on holiday. Incredible.

Dedans Penthouse
02-28-2011, 10:59 AM
^^ Were the roses de-thorned ?
Is a gerbil de-clawed?

;-)

r2473
02-28-2011, 01:00 PM
"Read the card!!!....read the card!!!!"

What did it say on the card?

Probably some crap he just pulled out of his ***.

sureshs
02-28-2011, 01:13 PM
What did it say on the card?

Probably some crap he just pulled out of his ***.

LOL

Will the card even be readable?

Sentinel
02-28-2011, 07:52 PM
LOL

Will the card even be readable?
If it isn't you can try Norton Utilities to repair it.
:twisted:

sureshs
03-01-2011, 08:25 AM
If it isn't you can try Norton Utilities to repair it.
:twisted:

And then it will seize control of his rear end and never quit.

I use Trend Micro at home. Not intrusive at all.

sureshs
03-01-2011, 08:27 AM
Fascinating how an old-fashioned, decent thread by Cindy has been turned into a naughty joke area.

Is this what society has come to?

LuckyR
03-01-2011, 09:16 AM
Well, as usual it depends. Cindy is Cindy and just isn't into cards. OK. They are all going to be skimmed and tossed (whether you spent 5 seconds or went to 5 stores to find them). OK.

But not everyone is Cindy. That's why the greeting card industry is likely doing just fine. They make more and more card types so they actually say in a highly polished way almost exactly what you are trying to say (assuming the recipient reads it).

Cindysphinx
03-01-2011, 12:58 PM
^Don't you see?

Unless we join hands and rise up, the greeting card industry will destroy us all! We will soon be required to send "Congratulations on Not Needing an Epidural!!" cards. "Happy Second Trimester!" cards. And from mom, "Isn't it about time you two Got Jiggy With It and made me a grandchild!" cards.

No. Enough is enough. Me, I'm taking the pledge:

I am not buying another single card for 2011. Not Mother's Day, Father's Day, Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Columbus Day or Christmas. If I need to convey condolences or suchlike, I will do it in my own words in a nice letter.

Hallmark, we're *through,* and this time I mean it!!!

LuckyR
03-02-2011, 08:50 AM
^Don't you see?

Unless we join hands and rise up, the greeting card industry will destroy us all! We will soon be required to send "Congratulations on Not Needing an Epidural!!" cards. "Happy Second Trimester!" cards. And from mom, "Isn't it about time you two Got Jiggy With It and made me a grandchild!" cards.

No. Enough is enough. Me, I'm taking the pledge:

I am not buying another single card for 2011. Not Mother's Day, Father's Day, Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Columbus Day or Christmas. If I need to convey condolences or suchlike, I will do it in my own words in a nice letter.

Hallmark, we're *through,* and this time I mean it!!!


OK, it's a free country, but let me ask you a question: say your daughter is going off to college in another state. You are going to correspond with her during college. You could text her, you could send her an email, you could send her a card (and maybe add a few lines), you could handwrite a "letter" (BTW a "letter" is a piece of "stationary" that a person writes on with a "pen" to state information they want the recipient to receive).

Which form of communication is she most likely to prefer? Which one is most likely to be in her possession in 20 years?

spaceman_spiff
03-02-2011, 09:15 AM
Ok, get this. In my department, every time there's a birthday, they pass around a standard issue birthday card that we are all expected to sign (I've got the boss's card on my desk right now). But, you can't just sign it; you have to write something meaningful.

It's tough to think of something meaningful to write to people who sit right next to you 5 days a week. And I've got to do it 15 times a year without them thinking I'm just writing the same thing over and over.

My colleagues are nice people and all, but they're not close friends that I hang out with after work. I know it sounds bad, but I don't really care about their birthdays. And, I don't expect them to care about my birthday either.

I'm not sure why we're forced into this ritual that isn't really all that sincere.

sureshs
03-02-2011, 09:52 AM
OK, it's a free country, but let me ask you a question: say your daughter is going off to college in another state. You are going to correspond with her during college. You could text her, you could send her an email, you could send her a card (and maybe add a few lines), you could handwrite a "letter" (BTW a "letter" is a piece of "stationary" that a person writes on with a "pen" to state information they want the recipient to receive).

Which form of communication is she most likely to prefer? Which one is most likely to be in her possession in 20 years?

The electronic forms other than email which will be deleted. If it is sent thru a social site like FB, it will be on their servers for ever.

Cindysphinx
03-03-2011, 04:34 AM
OK, it's a free country, but let me ask you a question: say your daughter is going off to college in another state. You are going to correspond with her during college. You could text her, you could send her an email, you could send her a card (and maybe add a few lines), you could handwrite a "letter" (BTW a "letter" is a piece of "stationary" that a person writes on with a "pen" to state information they want the recipient to receive).

Which form of communication is she most likely to prefer? Which one is most likely to be in her possession in 20 years?

Why do you assume the value of a piece of communication is based on how long it is kept in a drawer? Anyway, of the choices you provide, I would write her a letter (although I would likely write it on a piece of notebook paper).

Anyway, my daughter is in college and I have not once sent her a greeting card. I call her.

When I am dead and gone, she will have videos and photos of our time together.

We do not need Hallmark's help, thanks.

Cindysphinx
03-03-2011, 04:37 AM
Ok, get this. In my department, every time there's a birthday, they pass around a standard issue birthday card that we are all expected to sign (I've got the boss's card on my desk right now). But, you can't just sign it; you have to write something meaningful.

It's tough to think of something meaningful to write to people who sit right next to you 5 days a week. And I've got to do it 15 times a year without them thinking I'm just writing the same thing over and over.

My colleagues are nice people and all, but they're not close friends that I hang out with after work. I know it sounds bad, but I don't really care about their birthdays. And, I don't expect them to care about my birthday either.

I'm not sure why we're forced into this ritual that isn't really all that sincere.

Ya, we need to do away with all of the birthday crap, too.

It's weird. Someone gets diagnosed with cancer, and all of their friends suddenly disappear and can't bear to drop by and say hello.

Yet we engage in these rituals around birthdays, at a time when folks are not starved for the love and support of their friends.

Spaceman, just go ahead and write the exact same phrase for every birthday card. Consider it a form of silent protest. I suggest, "Wow! It's your birthday? You look *great!*"

spaceman_spiff
03-03-2011, 07:35 AM
Ya, we need to do away with all of the birthday crap, too.

It's weird. Someone gets diagnosed with cancer, and all of their friends suddenly disappear and can't bear to drop by and say hello.

Yet we engage in these rituals around birthdays, at a time when folks are not starved for the love and support of their friends.

Spaceman, just go ahead and write the exact same phrase for every birthday card. Consider it a form of silent protest. I suggest, "Wow! It's your birthday? You look *great!*"

Yeah, birthdays, christmas (including a few individuals who bring in their own cards for everyone), and others.

If it wasn't for the potential backlash, I'd throw away all the Christmas cards as soon as they showed up on my desk.

As for the birthday cards, if I'm one of the last ones in line to sign, I let them sit on my desk for an hour or so and then just pass them on to the next person. With all the signatures already there, they can't tell I haven't signed them.

jswinf
03-03-2011, 02:49 PM
But, you can't just sign it; you have to write something meaningful.



This must be the rule for female employees, they couldn't possibly expect this of men.

r2473
03-03-2011, 03:22 PM
I'm not sure why we're forced into this ritual that isn't really all that sincere.

Absent insincere rituals, there really isn't much left to life, when you think about it.

spaceman_spiff
03-04-2011, 01:53 AM
This must be the rule for female employees, they couldn't possibly expect this of men.

Some foolish people are unaware of the ways of the world. But, now that we've been doing this for about 4 or 5 years, even they have lost the will to write anything meaningful.

Like I said, I don't write anything at all anymore if I can help it.

spaceman_spiff
03-04-2011, 01:56 AM
Absent insincere rituals, there really isn't much left to life, when you think about it.

The sad thing is, I get the feeling life really is like that for many people. They're probably the ones who buy the most greeting cards.

LuckyR
03-04-2011, 10:24 AM
Why do you assume the value of a piece of communication is based on how long it is kept in a drawer? Anyway, of the choices you provide, I would write her a letter (although I would likely write it on a piece of notebook paper).

Anyway, my daughter is in college and I have not once sent her a greeting card. I call her.

When I am dead and gone, she will have videos and photos of our time together.

We do not need Hallmark's help, thanks.

Believe it or not, I am not the local rep for Hallmark Corp.

Firstly, I don't believe nor stated that, length of drawer-time is the definition of value.

I too have already made up my mind that I am going to write letters (not cards) personally. BTW I am a fountain pen geek, so I have a few years to work on my handwriting.

Calls are great, I use telephones on occasion myself. The value of the instantaneous feedback etc is invaluable. They are a bit weak, though, in the memory area, hence correspondence.

Your (my) daughter's opinion on the relative value of videos and photos vs letters and other written correspondence is more germane than your (my) own.

Polaris
03-04-2011, 10:41 AM
BTW I am a fountain pen geek

2 thumbs up!
Me too.

LuckyR
03-04-2011, 10:58 AM
2 thumbs up!
Me too.

This is in my breast pocket right now:

http://static.www.odcdn.com/pictures/us/od/sk/lg/520504_sk_lg.jpg

Polaris
03-04-2011, 12:58 PM
This is in my breast pocket right now:

http://static.www.odcdn.com/pictures/us/od/sk/lg/520504_sk_lg.jpg

Nice. Is that a Waterman? A Phileas?

Here's what I have for daily use: Parker Vector. Writes very smoothly. It's developed a small crack on the housing, and I am going to keep on using it until it breaks on me, and then get a nicer one (Like Lamy or Waterman).

http://www.montgomerypens.com/product_pictures/vector_blue11_fp_md.jpg

El Diablo
03-04-2011, 01:15 PM
Wow!! The same cindysphinx who once wrote that she was done with a pediatrician because the guy yawned when he saw her kid in the office now finds that someone going to the drug store to get her a card to express a warm sentiment is a meaningless gesture! You may be the most impossible-to-please person I've never met!! How about accepting a nice gesture at face value and getting off your soapbox already!!!!!

LuckyR
03-04-2011, 02:21 PM
Nice. Is that a Waterman? A Phileas?

Here's what I have for daily use: Parker Vector. Writes very smoothly. It's developed a small crack on the housing, and I am going to keep on using it until it breaks on me, and then get a nicer one (Like Lamy or Waterman).

http://www.montgomerypens.com/product_pictures/vector_blue11_fp_md.jpg

Yes it is a Phileas (which is recently discontinued, as you probably know). The prototypical starter pen (though it was my most recent acquisition).

My condolences on the build quality of your Parker. There was once a time when that name meant something. Speaking of which I would seriously consider a vintage pen as they are better than modern pens and usually at either a better or at least competitive pricepoint. Plus they mean something, historically.

Cindysphinx
03-04-2011, 08:37 PM
Wow!! The same cindysphinx who once wrote that she was done with a pediatrician because the guy yawned when he saw her kid in the office now finds that someone going to the drug store to get her a card to express a warm sentiment is a meaningless gesture! You may be the most impossible-to-please person I've never met!! How about accepting a nice gesture at face value and getting off your soapbox already!!!!!

The two subjects are completely and totally unrelated.

I wouldn't expect you to see that.

If you send me a greeting card, ElDiablo, I will set it on fire and put it on SpacemanSpiff's desk.

r2473
03-04-2011, 08:52 PM
If you send me a greeting card, ElDiablo, I will set it on fire and put it on SpacemanSpiff's desk.

What's your address?

El Diablo
03-05-2011, 09:09 AM
Not unrelated at all. Both are about appreciation and self-absorption. I've had patients tell me I seemed tired at times -- none has ever left my practice as far as I know because they appreciate the care they get and don't take it overly personally. Your thread here is also about appreciation. You start out by noting that someone going to a drug store, looking for a card, and then sending it to you is not such a big deal. Well, it is, and when someone takes even a moment out of their day to express something kind to me, much less a fair amount of time to go buy the card, I absolutely appreciate it. Sure, greeting cards are a little cheeseball sometimes, and the industry pushes the issue, but that's got nothing to do with the sentiment and effort the sender puts into it. "I don't appreciate receiving them," you write. You should. Someone tried to express something lovely to you, even if they didn't do it EXACTLY the way you think they should have done it.

spaceman_spiff
03-05-2011, 09:18 AM
If you send me a greeting card, ElDiablo, I will set it on fire and put it on SpacemanSpiff's desk.

I still won't sign it though. That baby will make it's way straight into the bin.

jester911
03-05-2011, 09:38 AM
Time to pick out a card for family and friends=10 seconds

Time to wail about it to nameless, faceless strangers=Endless

Priceless.

Cindysphinx
03-05-2011, 11:32 AM
I've had patients tell me I seemed tired at times -- none has ever left my practice as far as I know because they appreciate the care they get and don't take it overly personally.

ElDiablo,

Good lord. You're a *doctor?* And you behave like this? It's amazing to me that you have any patients at all. What is the medical profession coming to?

News flash: If your patients are telling you that you look tired, they might perhaps be indicating that *they don't trust you* or that they think you are not interested in their medical issues. Big red flag, dude. I would work on that if I were you. And if you are firing off massive yawns again and again while a patient is telling you their symptoms, you need to stop, STAT. It's rude and unprofessional.

Rather than spend your time stalking people on internet boards and dragging their children into threads about greeting cards, you might want to clean up your act and adopt a more professional demeanor around your patients.

Cindysphinx
03-05-2011, 11:33 AM
I still won't sign it though. That baby will make it's way straight into the bin.

Ha!! And since it will still be smoldering, you will set your whole office on fire.

Don't blame it on me!

spaceman_spiff
07-27-2011, 05:25 AM
A colleague just bought her first house. So guess what. Yep, that's right; a greeting card has made the rounds in my department and is now sitting on my desk.

Really? We're sending cards for moving homes now? I'd understand a card from the couple of close friends who work here. But a card from the entire department?

They say that the fading distinction between work and home life is affecting people. I think this is how it starts.

ollinger
07-27-2011, 09:03 AM
This is not how it starts. People have always brought home into work -- photos of the kids, gossip, whatever. What's changed is more people bringing work into the home -- longer hours, work taken home to finish, cell phones creating the expectation that people can be reached while on vacation or whenever. Oddly, I think the greeting card proliferation is a result of people being very busy in recent years -- easier to send a card (or particularly an e-card) than take the time to actually talk to people.

r2473
07-27-2011, 10:15 AM
This must be the rule for female employees, they couldn't possibly expect this of men.

It's just a chick thing.

They all b*tch about doing it but would be hurt beyond repair if someone didn't do this sort of thing for them on every conceivable "occasion". And they never forget anyone that forgot their "special" occasion.

The intricate world of chick social behavior is bizarre, but every chick understands and abides by it for fear of being ostracised. And it seems like it doesn't take much of a breach of chick social rules to be shunned by the rest of the group.

Cindy never said in this thread that she doesn't abide by the rules of chick society, she's just b*tching to her "girlfriends" about it. Again, just a normal chick thing.

jswinf
07-27-2011, 10:42 AM
There was a comic strip just the other day where a guy gave his girl "a gift card so you can go pick out any greeting card you want!"

Ben Hadd
07-27-2011, 05:45 PM
If I give a card, its hand made. Not into the heres my $4 feelings described as best by someone else.

spaceman_spiff
09-18-2013, 07:38 AM
Office 'best wishes' card signed by five million people
18-09-13

POLICE are trying to trace the recipient of a card signed by an estimated 5,000,000 workers across the UK.

The card has been passed from desk to desk for the last six months and disinterestedly scrawled with a non-specific message by 0.8 per cent of the British population.

The name of the recipient, along with any clues about the life event it relates to, has been completely obliterated under thousands of layers of blue and black ink.

Investigating officer DI Carolyn Ryan said: “Spectrographic analysis shows 1.5 million people wrote ‘Best wishes’, 2.2 million wrote ‘Good luck’ and 0.4 million wrote ‘Don’t get too drunk’.

“204,000 cheeky subversives, probably agency workers or people about to leave for university, drew ejaculating penises on it.

“The card features highly generic design and text, probably it was purchased by a low-ranking administrative worker who did not even know the recipient.

“It could be for a birthday, new job, new baby, marriage, promotion or even elective surgery.”

Police admit they are struggling with leads as none of the witnesses pays even the slightest attention to the many cards that cross their desks every single day.

DI Ryan continued: “We can’t analyse the card any further because one of the forensics team left it on their desk, it got passed around and signed and then went to the lads in traffic, and God knows where it went from there.

“But we remain anxious to trace the intended recipient of the card, whoever they are, to give them the card and an associated brown A4 envelope containing £640,000 in loose change.”

spaceman_spiff
04-17-2014, 07:26 AM
Five birthday cards have just been dropped on my desk. The previous two sat on my desk for a couple of weeks until people finally realized that I wasn't going to sign them. Now I'm getting hassled by people sitting next to me about why I don't like signing them.

If they keep pushing, then they're eventually going to hear the truth, which is that I don't care about their birthdays! They're grown men and women for God's sake!

r2473
04-17-2014, 08:02 AM
^^So to protest this minor hassle, you're turning it into a major hassle?

Sounds reasonable :confused:

Overdrive
04-17-2014, 08:21 AM
Five birthday cards have just been dropped on my desk. The previous two sat on my desk for a couple of weeks until people finally realized that I wasn't going to sign them. Now I'm getting hassled by people sitting next to me about why I don't like signing them.

If they keep pushing, then they're eventually going to hear the truth, which is that I don't care about their birthdays! They're grown men and women for God's sake!

You're going to be the 'office a-hole' if you do that.

spaceman_spiff
04-17-2014, 08:28 AM
^^So to protest this minor hassle, you're turning it into a major hassle?

Sounds reasonable :confused:

I do go with the strategy of passive resistance. They put cards on my desk. I let them sit there unsigned until someone takes them away.

The problem is that now people are giving me grief about not signing them. They want to know why I don't like it. Eventually, if they keep pushing hard enough, then I'm going to stop beating around the bush and tell them that I simply don't care about their birthdays.

BTW, there was a funny incident when I went through a phase of blindly signing the cards that were being pushed across my desk. I got a generic card that looked like a cookie-cutter birthday card, so I wrote a birthday message. It turned out to be a get well card for a lady who was recovering from chemo. Luckily, she has a great sense of humor and thought it was hilarious. After that, I thought about changing my message to "I am signing your card" for everything. Instead, I decided to just go back to not signing them.

r2473
04-17-2014, 08:54 AM
Seems easier to just write "Happy B-Day" and pass it on.

But I think you are intentionally avoiding the path of least resistance for a reason. Good luck, and Happy B-Day to you, whenever yours might be.

Sentinel
04-17-2014, 09:06 AM
Five birthday cards have just been dropped on my desk.
Actually, one of them was a congratulations card for a poster who became bionic recently. So you are the jerk who didn;t sign it !

:D ;)

LuckyR
04-17-2014, 09:08 AM
^^So to protest this minor hassle, you're turning it into a major hassle?

Sounds reasonable :confused:

Best post in the thread

spaceman_spiff
04-17-2014, 09:23 AM
Seems easier to just write "Happy B-Day" and pass it on.

But I think you are intentionally avoiding the path of least resistance for a reason. Good luck, and Happy B-Day to you, whenever yours might be.

The path of least resistance leads to more and more cards landing on my desk, often for people I hardly know. And as I mentioned before, it leads to me writing "Have a great birthday" on a get well card for someone battling cancer.

By the way, I lost my tennis match last night, but no one in my office gave me a condolences card. I'm starting to think that they don't care about me.

r2473
04-17-2014, 09:28 AM
By the way, I lost my tennis match last night, but no one in my office gave me a condolences card. I'm starting to think that they don't care about me.

I think the fastest way to improve is for you to take multiple lengthy lessons, unless you have a better idea.

Sentinel
04-18-2014, 05:08 AM
The path of least resistance leads to more and more cards landing on my desk, often for people I hardly know. And as I mentioned before, it leads to me writing "Have a great birthday" on a get well card for someone battling cancer.

By the way, I lost my tennis match last night, but no one in my office gave me a condolences card. I'm starting to think that they don't care about me.

Your condolence cards are lying on my desk. I'll be sure to sign them one of these weeks as soon as my birthday cards pour in (I hear they are stuck on your desk).

dParis
04-18-2014, 07:07 AM
The path of least resistance leads to more and more cards landing on my desk, often for people I hardly know. And as I mentioned before, it leads to me writing "Have a great birthday" on a get well card for someone battling cancer.

By the way, I lost my tennis match last night, but no one in my office gave me a condolences card. I'm starting to think that they don't care about me.

If the amount of birthday cards landing on your desk is keeping you from being productive, go to your department head and make a complaint. He/she probably has nothing better to do and you will be lauded for your commitment to efficiency which may help cover the antisocial label you have earned.

If you'd like to take a more anonymous and entertaining approach, clip a picture from a hardcore XXX magazine and staple it to the inside of the card and inconspicuously drop it off at a co-worker's desk while they are away. HR will issue a No Birthday Card Policy, or an NBCP, soon afterward.