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View Full Version : What is the most slippery multi have you used?


ricardo
03-09-2011, 05:42 PM
I am looking for a slippery multi/synthetic gut for my crosses. I have chronic TE/GE and polys even on the crosses make them worse. So far, the most slippery multi i have tried on my crosses is Babolat Xcel Premium. However, because to me it is too expensive ($18.00), i am looking for another slippery multi or synthetic gut.

What is the most slippery multi/synthetic gut have you used?

thanks in advance...

MagPro
03-10-2011, 12:08 AM
Pro Supex Maxim touch. Down right oily!

mikeler
03-10-2011, 08:10 AM
I am looking for a slippery multi/synthetic gut for my crosses. I have chronic TE/GE and polys even on the crosses make them worse. So far, the most slippery multi i have tried on my crosses is Babolat Xcel Premium. However, because to me it is too expensive ($18.00), i am looking for another slippery multi or synthetic gut.

What is the most slippery multi/synthetic gut have you used?

thanks in advance...


Can you tell us why you want the multi to be slippery? Are you worried about string breakage?

ricardo
03-10-2011, 08:58 AM
Can you tell us why you want the multi to be slippery? Are you worried about string breakage?

My primary concern is stringbed comfort. I believe that a low-friction cross string will allow a soft/elastic mains (i.e B. Tonic or B. Xcel) to stretch more freely during impact and thus be more comfortable.

Imagine this scenario:
If you glue the mains/crosses at each intersection so that they don't stretch or move at all (sideways or forward/backwards) during impact, then the resulting stringbed will be very, very stiff, no matter how soft the mains/crosses are.

Strings with very high string friction acts similarly like a glue: they prevent free string movement/stretching.

This may explain my experience with Tecnifibre E-Matrix (TW string db). It is very soft as tested by TW. But since the string friction is very high, the resulting stringbed stiffness is not what i expected from a soft string.

I determine string friction by moving the mains sideways with my fingers. The harder it is to move the higher the string friction (also makes grating sound while moving it). If the string does not snap back to its original position but rather stays where you moved it, that is another indication of high string friction. Another indication of high string friction is the sound the strings make during impact: it is an annoying grating sound.

mikeler
03-10-2011, 09:49 AM
My primary concern is stringbed comfort. I believe that a low-friction cross string will allow a soft/elastic mains (i.e B. Tonic or B. Xcel) to stretch more freely during impact and thus be more comfortable.

Imagine this scenario:
If you glue the mains/crosses at each intersection so that they don't stretch or move at all (sideways or forward/backwards) during impact, then the resulting stringbed will be very, very stiff, no matter how soft the mains/crosses are.

Strings with very high string friction acts similarly like a glue: they prevent free string movement/stretching.

This may explain my experience with Tecnifibre E-Matrix (TW string db). It is very soft as tested by TW. But since the string friction is very high, the resulting stringbed stiffness is not what i expected from a soft string.

I determine string friction by moving the mains sideways with my fingers. The harder it is to move the higher the string friction (also makes grating sound while moving it). If the string does not snap back to its original position but rather stays where you moved it, that is another indication of high string friction. Another indication of high string friction is the sound the strings make during impact: it is an annoying grating sound.


These are the 3 softest multis I've tried to date ranked from best to very good:

1) Mantis Comfort Synthetic 16
2) Pro Supex Maxim Touch 17
3) Babolat Xcel 16

Steve Huff
03-13-2011, 12:32 AM
So, you're saying that when the string notch and don't move, then they play stiff?

snoflewis
03-13-2011, 12:47 AM
OP, i would be more concerned about resting/rehabbing that elbow first. then choosing a super soft multi, and then seeing if it's your technique that's messing up your elbow.

even if your hypothesis of gluing the strings were correct, the elasticity of the string is far more important for comfort than its slipperiness. for one, any soft string isnt known for "snapping" back into place, meaning you have less control and are consequently going to have to string higher, which might aggravate that elbow more. secondly, even if the mains/crosses were glued together, the elasticity of the string would be far more important than it being slippery. when you hit the ball, most of the force is going against the strings/frame, which is where its elasticity would come into play. also, even if a string is slippery, it'll get rough once the outer layers see a little friction from the ball/strings. so yes, if a string was slippery it might help, but you're looking at the wrong characteristic. finding an elastic/soft string would help you the most when it comes to one defining characterisitc.

also, you never mention what racket you're using. that could have something to do with it, as well as your form.

stringwalla
03-13-2011, 12:30 PM
nothing slips in my clamps like the teflon coated Prince Recoil. Not sure how it plays though-

mikeler
03-13-2011, 12:59 PM
nothing slips in my clamps like the teflon coated Prince Recoil. Not sure how it plays though-

I probably will try out Recoil in the near future.