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View Full Version : New (3-22-11) at TWU: Spin and String Lubrication


TW Professor
03-22-2011, 12:15 PM
We have seen that lateral string movement increases spin. So,

Quetstion: What happens if you lubricate the strings to facilitate movement?
Answer: 14-58% increase in spin.

Here is the experiment and article:

http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/spinandlube.php

mathieu
03-22-2011, 12:19 PM
Quetstion: What happens if you lubricate the strings to facilitate movement?
Answer: 14-58% increase in spin.



I hope this isn't some statistical manipulation. I'm too stupid to understand the convoluted articles.

DavidNERODease
03-22-2011, 01:01 PM
Hmm, we're getting closer to some data that we can really make use of... I don't know if the used and fresh poly's were exactly the same racquet and string etc but nevertheless it is interesting to compare the differnece in spin and launch angles between unlubricated fresh and notched on 16x19 patterns - to me anyway (not that I don't appreciate the crazy side of all these experiments) Hehe, I'm impatient and just want to know what realistic string setups will most likely perform the best :???:

TW Professor
03-24-2011, 07:40 AM
In case you were wondering, lubricating strings is legal according to the current rules of tennis equipment.

SlowButSure
03-24-2011, 08:23 AM
In case you were wondering, lubricating strings is legal according to the current rules of tennis equipment.

Not sure about that. There's no rule against lubricating your strings, but if the lubricant gets on the ball, I think your opponant could argue that creates a hindrance for them. As it was intentional (you purposely put the lubricant on the strings knowing it would get on the ball), that would result in loss of point.

I guess it would be a judgement call for the official, but realistically, I don't see too many officials being sympathetic to you if you make the balls all greasy.

Maybe a dry graphite lubricant would be better, but then the ball might turn black.

I think it would be pretty risky unless you could find something that worked, and in no way modified the ball.

DavidNERODease
03-24-2011, 11:42 AM
It is a very interesting experiment which I tried almost 2 decades ago and again a couple days ago but I know that no matter what lubricant is used, besides the transfer from strings to the ball to the players hand (not cool), there will be a major problem with keeping consistant levels of lubrication between the strings during match play. Perhaps a spray on coating (that bonds and dries to the surface of the string of some sort would work better (spray it on the mains during stringing). Self lubricting string is the real answer which I think we already have to some extent ;) Maybe hard annodized teflon coated aluminum fibres in our Luxillon Aluminum Power!

bsandy
03-24-2011, 01:15 PM
Not sure about that. There's no rule against lubricating your strings, but if the lubricant gets on the ball, I think your opponant could argue that creates a hindrance for them. As it was intentional (you purposely put the lubricant on the strings knowing it would get on the ball), that would result in loss of point.

I guess it would be a judgement call for the official, but realistically, I don't see too many officials being sympathetic to you if you make the balls all greasy.

Maybe a dry graphite lubricant would be better, but then the ball might turn black.

I think it would be pretty risky unless you could find something that worked, and in no way modified the ball.

1. An Intentional Hinderance is something you do to hinder the person . . . Not something you do that hinders the person.

2. Black ink get on the ball in EVERY pro match.

3. Unless you bathe your strings in somthing, nothing significant will get on the ball.

. . . Bud

bsandy
03-24-2011, 01:21 PM
Thy these for lubricants.

1. Spray Silicone in the Automotive Department at Wal-Mart.

2. Spray Teflon from Lowes -- It's in a waxy base.

3. Rub some canning wax on the crosses.

4. People have been using Baby Oil for years.

Not sure if I'd use WD40, since it's also a pretty effective solvent.

treo
03-24-2011, 01:47 PM
An alternative to lubes is Babolat Elastocross which is made of plastic/teflon. I don't like the muted feel of using it on the whole stringbed. The setup I like is full poly with elastocross in the upper hoop sweetspot area and using it on every other row of crosses. One kit will be enough for 5 racquets. Then I spray with Armor All which keeps things slippery even after it rubs off and dries. Notching is minimal.

DrpShot!
03-28-2011, 11:37 AM
I've tired silcone spray and canning wax. Both gunked up the ball, made the felt fluff up and turn black with dirt from the court, definitely slowed the ball down after only a game or two. I didn't notice a ton of extra spin, but did notice a marked loss of power, ball barely getting to the service line that normally land around the baseline. I tired this on multifilament PU infused string (NRG2). Maybe the results would be better with poly.

ART ART
03-29-2011, 04:04 AM
I've tired silcone spray and canning wax. Both gunked up the ball, made the felt fluff up and turn black with dirt from the court, definitely slowed the ball down after only a game or two. I didn't notice a ton of extra spin, but did notice a marked loss of power, ball barely getting to the service line that normally land around the baseline. I tired this on multifilament PU infused string (NRG2). Maybe the results would be better with poly.

I had the same results like you did, with silicone spray.

But I was using a full bed of Poly, one with RPM and other with blackcode.

I did lost much power and Spin was just the same. I have to cut my strings, it felt like dead and mushy.

So not a good idea IMO.