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jgrushing
03-26-2011, 06:59 AM
I've played tennis for a long time, almost 40 years. I've gone through all sorts of changes in technology and string types. Today's love of polys among amateurs puzzles me.

Here's my experience. Most of the polys and co-polys play very stiff. So, everyone goes hybrid and pairs it with a softer synthetic or multi to soften it up. The end result is something that feels like a fairly stiff synthetic.

Two arguments are that the spin potential is much better with polys. I haven't really experienced that and most amateur players don't have the racquet head speed to really take advantage. Secondly, the polys last longer. I'll buy that, but the hybrid jobs cost more and the polys are a pain to string. Also, many of the people on the board string for themselves (including me). So, why does it matter if the expensive sets last longer.

My point. Find a synthetic (Gosen OGM for me) or inexpensive multi that feels good to you and quit worrying about what the pros are playing with. Just my two cents...

ethebull
03-26-2011, 10:23 AM
I played most of my tennis as a kid. From about age ten to 18. That was 33 years ago. I bought my first new racquet just two years ago, replacing my Dunlop Maxply Fort, to start playing with my new 17 year old step son.

First I went with a couple of syn guts, then a few multi's. I liked the syn gut better. Then I tried Gut / syn gut, all poly, poly /multi, I even tried kevlar with syn gut. Anyway, after buying a stringer last year and stringing for myself and my son, I've had the chance to try a wide range of string beds.

My favorite is a poly main, syn gut cross hybrid. I prefer the firm feel and control over all syn gut. A poly at 52-55 with a sg at 58 feels comfortably firm. A syn gut at 60 has about the same power response, but feels more boardy.

With modern day racquet technology, the poly/syn gut hybrid has become my favorite. It feels more like what I played with as a youngster. My old woodie strung with Ashway syn gut, didn't generate the ball speed my 100in MP strung with syn gut can today. The poly knocks down the power and provides the control I want.

Does it feel like a stiff synthetic? Yeah, pretty much, and just the way I like it.

Maroon_Tenniskid
03-26-2011, 10:31 AM
I get what you're saying, and after trying out 2 full beds of poly recently, I told myself I would not go back to full poly anymore. I have tried it a few times, and each time I don't like the lack of touch, and I'm not sure, but it could have even made my arm a bit more sore than normal. Each time I go back to a hybrid with Gosen OGSM and some other poly, and I really like that better. I have tried full Gosen OGSM and it's just so/so in a full bed, because it feels a bit too slippery and uncontrollable, I like hybrids because you still get the pop of the cross, and the spin/grippy feeling that I get from the poly. I agree with you about how some people worry too much about what the pros are using, and amateurs try using things like Luxilon, and I don't feel the need to spend $16 on a set of plastic strings that will go dead after an hour or two.

bad_call
03-26-2011, 10:45 AM
ethebull - maybe it's an old guy thing since this player mostly prefers the poly/syngut combo (exceptions exist). :)

pvaudio
03-26-2011, 10:46 AM
I played with full syn gut, then full multi, then full poly and now poly/gut. The final setup is perfect. You get insane amounts of spin compared to syn guts and multis, and the gut gives you an incredible amount of power.

jgrushing
03-26-2011, 10:52 AM
And you also get an expensive string job. I just haven't really found the spin difference to be that great. Of course, I haven't used poly/gut and I'm not planning to. Mine's a pretty heavy topspin game. I haven't really found a shortage with my under $4 Gosen.

The Matrix
03-26-2011, 10:54 AM
I've been playing with poly for a while now. I went back and tried some synthetic gut... Disgusting.

bad_call
03-26-2011, 10:57 AM
And you also get an expensive string job. I just haven't really found the spin difference to be that great. Of course, I haven't used poly/gut and I'm not planning to. Mine's a pretty heavy topspin game. I haven't really found a shortage with my under $4 Gosen.

how many hours do u get on a syn gut string job?

ollinger
03-26-2011, 11:02 AM
I only play with full poly, absolutely love the way it plays, usually use Silverstring or SpikyShark. LOTS more spin, more consistent response. The stiffness can be an issue in a very stiff racquet but I no longer go above RA=67 and it's been just fine.

jgrushing
03-26-2011, 11:04 AM
how many hours do u get on a syn gut string job?

Depends. I mostly play doubles these days so 6 or 8 sets is probably pretty common. Add in more groundstrokes where the spin is increased and that goes down. But, once again, I string them myself so I don't really care much about durability.

jgrushing
03-26-2011, 11:06 AM
I only play with full poly, absolutely love the way it plays, usually use Silverstring or SpikyShark. LOTS more spin, more consistent response. The stiffness can be an issue in a very stiff racquet but I no longer go above RA=67 and it's been just fine.

Good luck with your arm in the future. Can't imagine playing for any length of time with full poly bed of anything.

ethebull
03-26-2011, 11:07 AM
I have two poly reels that cost an average of $70 each. My preferred Syn gut is Babolat N.vy, normally $90 a reel, but I got a deal on the bay - $56 w/shipping. So a fresh set is $3.82 Bargains are always out there.

jgrushing
03-26-2011, 11:08 AM
I've been playing with poly for a while now. I went back and tried some synthetic gut... Disgusting.

No string's for everyone. Some people really like an extremely stiff string bed. I like firm but not as stiff as most polys.

jgrushing
03-26-2011, 11:10 AM
I have two poly reels that cost an average of $70 each. My preferred Syn gut is Babolat N.vy, normally $90 a reel, but I got a deal on the bay - $56 w/shipping. So a fresh set is $3.82 Bargains are always out there.

Yes, you can find deals. I was talking about poly/gut--not a lot of bargain guts that are any good.

bad_call
03-26-2011, 11:13 AM
Depends. I mostly play doubles these days so 6 or 8 sets is probably pretty common. Add in more groundstrokes where the spin is increased and that goes down. But, once again, I string them myself so I don't really care much about durability.

also string my own and play mostly singles. syn gut wouldn't satisfy how i hit and natural gut would cut into my beer allowance which is a big no-no. :)

bad_call
03-26-2011, 11:33 AM
ethebull - how is the durability and tension maintenance with N.vy? apologies for the slight derailment.

ethebull
03-26-2011, 11:49 AM
bc, It has a lively consistent feel that I really like. TM is better than any I've tried. It starts to wander and get notched right when the poly is going south - around 8-10 hrs for me.

I don't know that I will pay $90 for my next reel. Is it twice as good as Spiral Flex or Gosen? Hard to say, but I won't have to decide for a while.

pvaudio
03-26-2011, 12:01 PM
And you also get an expensive string job. I just haven't really found the spin difference to be that great. Of course, I haven't used poly/gut and I'm not planning to. Mine's a pretty heavy topspin game. I haven't really found a shortage with my under $4 Gosen.
I can restring any of my sticks for $15. Account for about $10 for the gut crosses, $5 for the poly mains. That's what I charge a customer for a full bed of synthetic gut, labor included. Each of my string jobs lasts until the gut crosses break which has been up to a month to 5 weeks even with the poly long since gone dead. The benefit is that the resiliency of the gut absorbs the shock of the dead monofilament so that you don't end up hurting yourself. No synthetic cross can offer that. If you strung up a full bed of NRG for $12-14, you'd be replacing it about every three times you go out on the court. I get many times that durability, many times the performance and many times the cost/performance ratio. There's a reason why people say that gut actually is the most cost effective string out there. Coupled with a good poly (assuming that's the feel that you like), and you have an unbeatable combination.

I hit with an incredibly large amount of spin off both wings, utilize a large serve to set up points (100+) with a very large amount of action on the ball (used to use an even bigger serve, but was flatter and didn't yield the accuracy and consistency that I can now achieve...that is once my new motion finally clicks :) ) and will readily volley away shots which demands a great deal of feel unlike most of the baseliners that comprise today's majority. There just isn't any other combination out there that lets me play exactly the way I want to.

I don't play Babolat or Wilson or even Klip gut. My so-called e Bay gut (PerforMAXX) plays, in my and not surprisingly now many others' opinions, better than anything other than VS Team. I don't endorse any product or company, but let me tell you this: it does pay to play with natty. It lasts many times longer than any synthetic and unlike any synthetic, if you hybrid it, it lets you get away with playing with dead poly.

Could a 4.5 or 5.0 with full syn gut blow me off the court? Absolutely, I have no doubt or qualms about admitting that. It's a matter of being able to play the tennis that you want to. I play with a discontinued, low powered 90sq in, flexy Dunlop frame. Putting in full synthetic is a waste since the AG100 is not a spin monster in itself. Putting in a poly will yield loads more spin whether it's in the main or crosses.

So sorry for the novel, I'm just trying to make the point that people aren't using poly because it's what the pros use (I honestly only know of 3 pros' string setups: Fed, Djoker and Blake), they're using poly because it's a new type of string that perfectly fits the new modern strokes that you see.

pvaudio
03-26-2011, 12:03 PM
Yes, you can find deals. I was talking about poly/gut--not a lot of bargain guts that are any good.

http://cgi.e bay.com/PMAXX-WhisperTouch-1-20mm-2x20-Natural-Gut-Tennis-/220748068326?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item33659c35e6

Remove the space after the e in e bay. Try it and you'll say, Babolat what? Trust me :)

jgrushing
03-26-2011, 12:28 PM
I can restring any of my sticks for $15. Account for about $10 for the gut crosses, $5 for the poly mains. That's what I charge a customer for a full bed of synthetic gut, labor included. Each of my string jobs lasts until the gut crosses break which has been up to a month to 5 weeks even with the poly long since gone dead. The benefit is that the resiliency of the gut absorbs the shock of the dead monofilament so that you don't end up hurting yourself. No synthetic cross can offer that. If you strung up a full bed of NRG for $12-14, you'd be replacing it about every three times you go out on the court. I get many times that durability, many times the performance and many times the cost/performance ratio. There's a reason why people say that gut actually is the most cost effective string out there. Coupled with a good poly (assuming that's the feel that you like), and you have an unbeatable combination.

I hit with an incredibly large amount of spin off both wings, utilize a large serve to set up points (100+) with a very large amount of action on the ball (used to use an even bigger serve, but was flatter and didn't yield the accuracy and consistency that I can now achieve...that is once my new motion finally clicks :) ) and will readily volley away shots which demands a great deal of feel unlike most of the baseliners that comprise today's majority. There just isn't any other combination out there that lets me play exactly the way I want to.

I don't play Babolat or Wilson or even Klip gut. My so-called e Bay gut (PerforMAXX) plays, in my and not surprisingly now many others' opinions, better than anything other than VS Team. I don't endorse any product or company, but let me tell you this: it does pay to play with natty. It lasts many times longer than any synthetic and unlike any synthetic, if you hybrid it, it lets you get away with playing with dead poly.

Could a 4.5 or 5.0 with full syn gut blow me off the court? Absolutely, I have no doubt or qualms about admitting that. It's a matter of being able to play the tennis that you want to. I play with a discontinued, low powered 90sq in, flexy Dunlop frame. Putting in full synthetic is a waste since the AG100 is not a spin monster in itself. Putting in a poly will yield loads more spin whether it's in the main or crosses.

So sorry for the novel, I'm just trying to make the point that people aren't using poly because it's what the pros use (I honestly only know of 3 pros' string setups: Fed, Djoker and Blake), they're using poly because it's a new type of string that perfectly fits the new modern strokes that you see.

I still see the kids that I and my son play with breaking the poly mains about as often as the multi crosses. They do last longer than all syn or multi.

I'll have to give the cheap gut a look. However, I'm pretty happy with what I'm playing.

Also, $15 is a pretty cheap hybrid but still a lot more than $3.79. You're right though, it's all about what makes you happy. I guess my point is that most players don't know what makes them happy. They want to play Lux because their friend's playing it. And his friend's playing it because his friend is playing it.

The racquet is important too. A flexy stick like you're playing is certainly more conducive to a stiff string than most racquets.

pvaudio
03-26-2011, 01:01 PM
Be careful with the inexpensive guts though. Only the Performaxx line that I use has turned out to be great. Never broken it while stringing, and the only mishap was some breaking in my bag after doing a special order that got shipped out too soon :)

Rorsach
03-26-2011, 01:40 PM
I like the way gut feels, but i play in all kinds of weather, including light rain and frost, so i needed a string that can survive that, gut doesn't.
I just happened upon a bunch of MVS poly strings and i've stuck with Focus Hex, great string (for me and my racquet) for not too much cash.

Tennis100
03-26-2011, 07:50 PM
I just played the number 39th ranked 12 and under player, those kids hit extremely hard for their height and get huge amounts of spin. But I won so I feel hardcore
But it looked like he was using full poly

BigT
03-26-2011, 09:02 PM
I don't think players below the 4.0 level really benefit from polys.

jgrushing
03-27-2011, 02:43 AM
I don't even think most 4.0 players can see any real benefit, over than longevity. I know that I don't see extreme spin from the 4.0 players that I hit with.

There are a couple of kids that I see on my son's HS team that poly probably helps. But I worry about their arms in the long term.

In my mind, polys aren't really any different than extreme tensions some pros and other used to use. Borg strung in the 80s. He wanted a stiff string bed that would spin the heck out of the ball while giving lots of control. It's not like poly is anything special--just a tough, non-resilient string with a dead feel.

Most of the people that I know using them do it for the durability.

Carolina Racquet
03-27-2011, 04:07 AM
I don't even think most 4.0 players can see any real benefit, over than longevity. I know that I don't see extreme spin from the 4.0 players that I hit with.

There are a couple of kids that I see on my son's HS team that poly probably helps. But I worry about their arms in the long term.

In my mind, polys aren't really any different than extreme tensions some pros and other used to use. Borg strung in the 80s. He wanted a stiff string bed that would spin the heck out of the ball while giving lots of control. It's not like poly is anything special--just a tough, non-resilient string with a dead feel.

Most of the people that I know using them do it for the durability.

In all due respect, I disagree. Poly has been proven to generate more spin because of its extreme string movement on the string bed at ball impact. True, you have to have a swing that accommodates spin to reap the benefits. I also like the low power feeling of poly due to its reduced elasticity.

Myself, a 4.0 player, believes poly definitely complements my game.

With that said, I also know too many who use poly and shouldn't because they hit the ball flat AND string at a too high tension AND use a stiff racquet. I worry about their arm health at some point and I don't see how poly helps their game.

In all, I think players need to be more educated on the pros and cons of each type of string and not blindly follow what the tour players use. Each type of string matches what different players are seeking.

jgrushing
03-27-2011, 04:22 AM
In all due respect, I disagree. Poly has been proven to generate more spin because of its extreme string movement on the string bed at ball impact. True, you have to have a swing that accommodates spin to reap the benefits. I also like the low power feeling of poly due to its reduced elasticity.

Myself, a 4.0 player, believes poly definitely complements my game.

With that said, I also know too many who use poly and shouldn't because they hit the ball flat AND string at a too high tension AND use a stiff racquet. I worry about their arm health at some point and I don't see how poly helps their game.

In all, I think players need to be more educated on the pros and cons of each type of string and not blindly follow what the tour players use. Each type of string matches what different players are seeking.

Thanks for the input. I don't think we really disagree. I also am a 4.0 player--I don't think there are many players of 4.0 or lower that generate the racquet head speed to get much out of poly. Granted, it gives them better control but at a cost. There are other options that are cheaper and better on the arm.

I notice you have a Klippermate. I string on a Klipper also and am not too fond of stringing poly on it. Any tips you've learned that make it easier? I get a few friends that want it and I hate stringing it.

barry
03-27-2011, 04:30 AM
I am a 4.5 player and came to the conclusion string alone is not going to bring me up to a Federer level. I think most players benefit more playing with the same equipment, rather than switching frames or strings. On the tour, very few players switch anything; they stick with the original, and learn to play with it. We all would like to think there is a new gadget out there which makes the miracle happen, but in reality, after a week or two we are back to where we started. I have played with every combination from Problend to gut, and always go back to synthetic gut. It fits my game better, saves me money, and eliminates the wear and tear on joints.

GlenK
03-27-2011, 04:48 AM
I'm an old tennis player too.. (58) Played a decent level and tournaments when I was young, but now am a 4.0 player.

I'm retired and just started into the stringing business a few weeks ago as a hobby and for some part-time money.
I have been playing with a full bed of Supersense for about two years and love it. No arm problems of any short. Now it's been discontinued so I'm searching for a replacement set up that feels that good.
SS reminded me of the gut feel when I was a kid.
I have no delusions about being a great player due to the strings I use, but the poly I used was perfect for me.
Can't question anyone's motives. My motives are just have fun, pick up a few bucks, and enjoy the learning process about today's technology.

I really appreciate everyone's input on this forum. Forty years ago this was an easy game from a tech standpoint. Now I feel like I'm in medical school.

GlenK
03-27-2011, 04:49 AM
^^Guess I'm older than I thought, typed 58, don't know where that smiley came from..

westpac690
03-27-2011, 04:52 AM
I've played tennis for a long time, almost 40 years. I've gone through all sorts of changes in technology and string types. Today's love of polys among amateurs puzzles me.

Here's my experience. Most of the polys and co-polys play very stiff. So, everyone goes hybrid and pairs it with a softer synthetic or multi to soften it up. The end result is something that feels like a fairly stiff synthetic.

Two arguments are that the spin potential is much better with polys. I haven't really experienced that and most amateur players don't have the racquet head speed to really take advantage. Secondly, the polys last longer. I'll buy that, but the hybrid jobs cost more and the polys are a pain to string. Also, many of the people on the board string for themselves (including me). So, why does it matter if the expensive sets last longer.

My point. Find a synthetic (Gosen OGM for me) or inexpensive multi that feels good to you and quit worrying about what the pros are playing with. Just my two cents...

To answer the initial question. Many of the modern racquets are designed for use with poly. The newer racquets are inherently more powerful, so if you don't throw some poly in there somewhere, you'll have a lot of balls flying on you. I use a hybrid at 67 lbs. I haven't gone full poly yet, but I might do plan on trying it sooner or later.

Carolina Racquet
03-27-2011, 04:55 AM
I notice you have a Klippermate. I string on a Klipper also and am not too fond of stringing poly on it. Any tips you've learned that make it easier? I get a few friends that want it and I hate stringing it.

That's pretty funny because I prefer to string poly now because I'm used to it and when I string a more elastic string I have to compensate accordingly.

I'm assuming your frustration is with the amount of string feed needed to get the right arm position when dropped. Is there another issue?

What you have to do is have more slack in the string fed in the tension jaw. The stiffer the poly, the more slack. The less stiffer... less slack.. etc.

I use a technique where I make subtle adjustments in the feed going into the tension jaw based on partial drops.... if that makes sense. If the drop isn't enough, I bring the arm up and feed more.. If too much drop, I bring the arm up and feed in less.

I'm usually at about 30 minutes for stringing poly. The biggest challenge I have with it is the coil memory issue. I read a suggestion that helps with keeping that in check which is put the coil on your wrist before you remove the tie. It will help keep the string organized as it relaxes. I keep the coil on my wrist as I feed off string to measure my half-way point for a 2 piece or hybrid job.

Hope some of this helps. Let me know if there's any questions.

jgrushing
03-27-2011, 06:01 AM
Yes, the amount of slack is my main frustration. I've had a Klippermate for 20 years. I've strung as low as 22 minutes with synthetic. Just the slowdown necessary for polyester is aggravating. Not a big deal because I never do a full bed of poly. Guess the mains aren't that big of a deal.

What's the softest poly you've found? My son still likes to experiment with it since his friends mostly use poly hybrids.

bad_call
03-27-2011, 06:35 AM
Yes, the amount of slack is my main frustration. I've had a Klippermate for 20 years. I've strung as low as 22 minutes with synthetic. Just the slowdown necessary for polyester is aggravating. Not a big deal because I never do a full bed of poly. Guess the mains aren't that big of a deal.

What's the softest poly you've found? My son still likes to experiment with it since his friends mostly use poly hybrids.

also use a klippermate. full poly can be tedious depending on the stiffness and gauge (especially weaving crosses). there are a number of threads on soft polys. mikeler recently started one which could be worth a read. suggest skipping over some of the "drama" posts in his thread. ;)

jgrushing
03-27-2011, 06:44 AM
I'm an old tennis player too.. (58) Played a decent level and tournaments when I was young, but now am a 4.0 player.

I'm retired and just started into the stringing business a few weeks ago as a hobby and for some part-time money.
I have been playing with a full bed of Supersense for about two years and love it. No arm problems of any short. Now it's been discontinued so I'm searching for a replacement set up that feels that good.
SS reminded me of the gut feel when I was a kid.
I have no delusions about being a great player due to the strings I use, but the poly I used was perfect for me.
Can't question anyone's motives. My motives are just have fun, pick up a few bucks, and enjoy the learning process about today's technology.

I really appreciate everyone's input on this forum. Forty years ago this was an easy game from a tech standpoint. Now I feel like I'm in medical school.

None of the poly I've ever hit feels remotely like gut. I'm intrigued. The polys I've hit have been stiff and non-elastic. The gut I used long ago was anything but stiff was quite elastic. Let me know if you find anything.

bad_call
03-27-2011, 07:05 AM
GlenK - if it's ok, i'll look you up when in your area. reads like we share similar tennis experience and age. i'll bring my racquets and maybe surfboard. :)

joe sch
03-27-2011, 07:45 AM
I like the way gut feels, but i play in all kinds of weather, including light rain and frost, so i needed a string that can survive that, gut doesn't.
I just happened upon a bunch of MVS poly strings and i've stuck with Focus Hex, great string (for me and my racquet) for not too much cash.

My story is pretty much the same ... long time gut player and never really wanted to make the poly jump due to the side effects on the arm. Copolys like MSV are the best compromise since they still play great in the humid wet weather and dont hurt, especially at lower tensions.

Hominator
03-27-2011, 07:57 AM
^^Guess I'm older than I thought, typed 58, don't know where that smiley came from..

If you type "8" followed by ")", a smiley face with sunglasses will appear.

GlenK
03-27-2011, 08:11 AM
None of the poly I've ever hit feels remotely like gut. I'm intrigued. The polys I've hit have been stiff and non-elastic. The gut I used long ago was anything but stiff was quite elastic. Let me know if you find anything.

And I've only tried Supersense at this point so I can't compare to other polys. Now they stopped making it.. Oh well.. Luxilon has told me that the new M2 Pro is a lot like Supersense.
I have some ordered and will post on here if that's true.
I have bought all the SS I could find already and keep checking.. I have 12 sets stocked up..

GlenK
03-27-2011, 08:13 AM
GlenK - if it's ok, i'll look you up when in your area. reads like we share similar tennis experience and age. i'll bring my racquets and maybe surfboard. :)


Sounds good, just let me know. I live in St Augustine, FL, but play mostly in Jacksonville..
Can't surf anymore, but we'll do the tennis thing.. :grin:

GlenK
03-27-2011, 08:14 AM
If you type "8" followed by ")", a smiley face with sunglasses will appear.

Ok, didn't know that. I was trying to put the 58 in ()..

Carolina Racquet
03-27-2011, 12:35 PM
Yes, the amount of slack is my main frustration. I've had a Klippermate for 20 years. I've strung as low as 22 minutes with synthetic. Just the slowdown necessary for polyester is aggravating. Not a big deal because I never do a full bed of poly. Guess the mains aren't that big of a deal.

What's the softest poly you've found? My son still likes to experiment with it since his friends mostly use poly hybrids.

Big fan of the Tourna Big Hitter Blue, Big Hitter Blue Rough and Silver Rough. They have a very soft feel for a full bed and the price is right when you buy by the reel. Also maintain tension well.

Ron Insana
03-27-2011, 05:53 PM
Each of my string jobs lasts until the gut crosses break which has been up to a month to 5 weeks even with the poly long since gone dead. The benefit is that the resiliency of the gut absorbs the shock of the dead monofilament so that you don't end up hurting yourself. No synthetic cross can offer that. If you strung up a full bed of NRG for $12-14, you'd be replacing it about every three times you go out on the court. I get many times that durability, many times the performance and many times the cost/performance ratio. There's a reason why people say that gut actually is the most cost effective string out there. Coupled with a good poly (assuming that's the feel that you like), and you have an unbeatable combination.

I hit with an incredibly large amount of spin off both wings, utilize a large serve to set up points (100+) with a very large amount of action on the ball (used to use an even bigger serve, but was flatter and didn't yield the accuracy and consistency that I can now achieve...that is once my new motion finally clicks :) ) and will readily volley away shots which demands a great deal of feel unlike most of the baseliners that comprise today's majority. There just isn't any other combination out there that lets me play exactly the way I want to.

I don't play Babolat or Wilson or even Klip gut. My so-called e Bay gut (PerforMAXX) plays, in my and not surprisingly now many others' opinions, better than anything other than VS Team. I don't endorse any product or company, but let me tell you this: it does pay to play with natty. It lasts many times longer than any synthetic and unlike any synthetic, if you hybrid it, it lets you get away with playing with dead poly.




I love reading your posts PV. I completely agree that poly main, gut cross is the best setup there is and I did use that for a while. However, I cannot accept playing with dead strings and the poly mains kept going dead on me, so I got to the point where I had my stringer cut out only the poly mains and keep the VS team crosses. I got him to do this for me several times but no matter how much he prestretched the poly or how much tension he added, it just didn't feel the same as a fresh stringjob. Finally, I settled on VS Touch 15L mains and VS Team crosses on my tight pattered BLX Pro Tour (DelPotro), which somewhat simulates a poly/gut setup. Being as value conscious as I am performance conscious, I can honestly say I have found my holy grail setup. I have a nineties style offensive game--I hit he ball visciously hard and flat on the serve and forehand (think 4.5 Fernanado Gonzalez). After 3 months of play (2-3 times per week) there is very little fraying and no drop in performance or tension. I really think with some stringsavers, I can get at least 8 months from this stringjob--awesome!

Larrysümmers
03-27-2011, 06:17 PM
Hm maybe once i have some funds saved up. i will try Pv's gut. ive always wanted to try it but never wanted to fork out the cash lol.

Ron Insana
03-27-2011, 06:19 PM
I've been playing with poly for a while now. I went back and tried some synthetic gut... Disgusting.

I could not agree with this more. Today's polys are much better quality than any syn gut and are well worth the extra money IMHO. I don't get all the hype around Gosen OGSM on these boards--I found this to be one of the worst playing strings ever, totally stiff and dead, way worse than the TNT I used to play with long ago. Having said that, nothing beats gut and that is also well worth the extra $$. Just tried NRG2 again recently and it plays like total plastic mush compared to gut.

neesun
03-28-2011, 02:53 AM
I've tried full poly, gut/poly & poly/gut in my Babolat Pure Storm Ltd.

I've used full bed of Luxilon BB Alu Power, it was ok but all I really got was constant shoulder pain and lacklustre net play.

I then tried Babolat VS touch (main)/Luxilon BB Alu Power (cross). I was literally playing with a totally different racquet. A really great string set up which pocketed the ball nicely and provided very good touch at the net and spin. And the best thing, no shoulder pain.

Finally, and most recently, I strung my racquet with Luxilon BB Alu Power (main)/Babolat VS touch (cross). Once again a very nice setup and for some reason I liked this more than the gut/poly setup I used previously. Booming serves, good spin and excellent at the net.

For me personally I don't think I'll be trying anything else besides gut/poly or poly/gut. The VS Natty Gut is pricey though so I may consider a cheaper gut in the future like the Pacific, Klip or even the Performaxx. But having said that, the durability of the VS Natty Gut in a hybrid setup has been really good. I may even give synthetic gut in a hybrid with the Luxilon BB Alu Power a go down the track.