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View Full Version : Super-Glue-ing your strings together.


Maroon_Tenniskid
03-30-2011, 05:45 PM
With all of the talk about how string to string friction helps get more spin because the strings can move more freely and snap back into place faster to generate spin, I was wondering if anybody has tried super glueing their strings together. I know it sounds crazy, but is it possible that it could INCREASE spin as well because the strings don't move at all? If anybody has tried this, did you get any good results? I might try it just to play around with and see if it works or does anything weird at all.

kcmiser
03-30-2011, 06:17 PM
I hate to admit it, but I did do this. Just put superglue where the mains and crosses met, because string movement annoys me. Worked for ten minutes or so, and the stringbed felt firmer than normal, but then the bond broke at various points, and it was back to normal. No amazing results or anything, it just felt slightly firmer while it held.

I wouldn't repeat the experiment, but if I did, I'd make sure I pulled each string aside so as to get superglue between the strings themselves, so it might hold better. More promise to keep a dying stringjob from snapping than to increase performance.

mctennis
03-30-2011, 07:20 PM
How many of your fingers did you glue together?

Maroon_Tenniskid
03-30-2011, 07:26 PM
I hate to admit it, but I did do this. Just put superglue where the mains and crosses met, because string movement annoys me. Worked for ten minutes or so, and the stringbed felt firmer than normal, but then the bond broke at various points, and it was back to normal. No amazing results or anything, it just felt slightly firmer while it held.

I wouldn't repeat the experiment, but if I did, I'd make sure I pulled each string aside so as to get superglue between the strings themselves, so it might hold better. More promise to keep a dying stringjob from snapping than to increase performance.

Haha yeah, that's kinda what I figured. I did it with a poly and got the same result, but I bet it would work a bit better with a multi or even a hybrid. What kind of string did you try it with?

Virtua Tennis
03-30-2011, 07:32 PM
With all of the talk about how string to string friction helps get more spin because the strings can move more freely and snap back into place faster to generate spin, I was wondering if anybody has tried super glueing their strings together. I know it sounds crazy, but is it possible that it could INCREASE spin as well because the strings don't move at all? If anybody has tried this, did you get any good results? I might try it just to play around with and see if it works or does anything weird at all.

I use to do this all the time when I was a kid it worked great it extended my strings for a few more hours of play. Also they say that if your strings are straight you can hit a better shot. Than when your string are all crooked.

SirGounder
03-30-2011, 09:04 PM
How many of your fingers did you glue together?

Lol i was thinking the exact same thing. I would end up with my fingers stuck to the string.

RyanRF
03-30-2011, 09:21 PM
With all of the talk about how string to string friction helps get more spin because the strings can move more freely and snap back into place faster to generate spin, I was wondering if anybody has tried super glueing their strings together. I know it sounds crazy, but is it possible that it could INCREASE spin as well because the strings don't move at all? If anybody has tried this, did you get any good results? I might try it just to play around with and see if it works or does anything weird at all.

Err I think you're missing the point.

String displacement and snap-back is related to spin. Ideally you want low friction between strings, but high friction from the strings to the ball.

If you glue the strings together there will no displacement and no snap-back, resulting in less spin.

If anything, you might try lubricating the strings (like with WD-40) to increase the displacement and snap-back.

kiteboard
03-30-2011, 09:41 PM
Also causes cancer.