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View Full Version : MS 200TT vs Gamma Progression ST II


sherpa78
04-23-2004, 10:52 PM
Hey all,
I'm planning on upgrading from my ATS Super Stringer II fairly soon (within a couple of months), and I'm thinking of going either with a laserfibre MS200TT with Single Action fixed clamps or a Gamma Progression ST II. There are a couple of things I'd like to know from those who own either (or both?) stringers

1) I know Gamma can be found at most online retailers for ~$620. How much does the LaserFibre go for? I'd guess in the ~$800 range. If it is that much more expensive, how would you convince someone to invest nearly a third more?

2) How fast can you string with a MS200TT vs Gamma Progression? I've had my ATS SSII for about 3 months, and I've strung 6 racquets so far, but my stringing time is about 2 hours still. And, not to mention how tiring it gets with the flying clamps and the ratcheting grip.

Basically, I want to get a good idea of what the benefits and weaknesses are between these two fine stringers from their owners/users, before I plop down good hard-earned money! :?

Thanks guys,
Sherpa78

SW Stringer
04-24-2004, 12:18 AM
"How fast can you string with a MS200TT vs Gamma Progression? I've had my ATS SSII for about 3 months, and I've strung 6 racquets so far, but my stringing time is about 2 hours still. And, not to mention how tiring it gets with the flying clamps and the ratcheting grip."

Speaking from experience, having done over 370 frames in the past 5 years on a Klippermate (equivalent to an ATS SSII) I'd say that you might be able to shave 15 minutes off your stringing time with one of the machines you've listed. I too took almost 2 hours when I first started, the first year I did only my frames which amounted to 30 string jobs. I was probably averaging 1 to 1 1/2 hours by then. My speed gradually increased as I learned to handle the string (finally figured out how to eliminate knots and rats nests), weave faster - by doing one ahead, memorizing the pattern - so one's not referring back to the book, etc. Now, on familiar frames, 30 to 45 minutes is the norm. This all comes with practice, and practice and more practice. Ain't nothing gonna take the place of doing lots of frames. That's where the speed increase comes in.

So you will get good advice for that money burning a hole in your pocket from this message board, but I'd wait until you've refined your techniques, put a lot more string jobs under the belt, made a few mistakes, and actually know how to string. Then you'll have a greater appreciation for the many features offered on the higher priced machines.

sherpa78
04-24-2004, 10:42 PM
SW Stringer,
That is amazing how fast you can string a racquet now! But, how long did it take you to do it that fast? And, have you ever used any other stringers before? How do you know that you are not missing out on stringers, while much more expensive than your Klippermate, are actually easier to use and produce better results?

I understand the economics at hand: why spend a crap load more dinero when I have a viable solution already? I truly believe that there is a reason why the Gamma and LaserFibre machines I mentioned are much more expensive. First and foremost reason, I would guess, is that they are a heck of a lot easier to use. 2nd, is that they produce much more consistent results.

So, now, one has to ask are these things worth the extra financial commitment? Considering I break a string a week, I would say that a need for a much more convenient, quicker stringer is well worth the commitment. I can see how fixed clamps can make it a lot easier to string, especially by pre-lacing the string. (I'm not sure this is possible with flying clamps, and if there is anyone out there who could let me in on how to do it, I'd be very appreciative!)

Also, I was hoping owners of the Gamma STII and Laserfibre MS200TT could share their insights. :)

Thanks,
Sherpa78

SW Stringer
04-25-2004, 09:25 AM
"actually easier to use and produce better results?

I understand the economics at hand: why spend a crap load more dinero when I have a viable solution already? I truly believe that there is a reason why the Gamma and LaserFibre machines I mentioned are much more expensive. First and foremost reason, I would guess, is that they are a heck of a lot easier to use. 2nd, is that they produce much more consistent results. "

The man (artist, craftsman,technician, operator) behind the machine is the force that creates the product. While a more fully featured machine (>$'s) may facilitate the ease and speed at which the final product is produced, it IS the human behind the machine who is ultimately responsible for the quality of the work. A mere operator behind a Sensor can and will produce crap compared to an artist behind an inexpensive dw.

If one were to perform a double blind test using Rod Laver with a dowel rod and awl, me with a Klippermate and you with a Sensor and we each strung an old woodie, a T2000, and a POG, whose output would be judged superior, and whose inferior? And who wouldn't even finish the test? I'm sure Rod Laver would beat us both hands down (if he's still alive).

Point is, experience counts the most - so you need to get some frames under your belt.

sherpa78
04-25-2004, 01:40 PM
So, following your logic, what would be the motivation for anyone to buy a more expensive stringer?

Cruzer
04-25-2004, 03:45 PM
I have had my ST II for about four years and am totally satisfied with it. I think it is a better deal to day than when I bought mine because they have upgraded the clamps to all metal and the price has remained the same. I know the Laserfibre owners out there all love there machines and believe they are worth every penny they cost. Personally I think the ST II or the Alpha Revo are just as good as the Laserfibre machine are both are also significantly cheaper.

sherpa78
04-25-2004, 04:01 PM
Cruzer,
Thanks for your response Cruzer! It's nice to get a response from someone who is very familiar with one of the 2 stringers in question.

The more I think about it, the more I think it'd be better to buy either the Gamma STII or the Alpha Revo 4000.

Smashlob
04-25-2004, 05:39 PM
I used a friend's STII this weekend, and it was a solid machine. I would reccomend it.

sherpa78
04-27-2004, 06:08 PM
Actually, now I'm contemplating the alpha revo 4000 since it looks to be similar to Gamma STII, plus, if I buy it from TennisWarehouse, I will get a year's worth USRSA membership included! :)

Any thoughts?

Simbah2004
04-28-2004, 08:07 AM
I'm thinking about doing the same, buying the Alpha Revo 4000. It's a great machine, and a little cheaper than the others you have mentioned.

sherpa78
04-28-2004, 08:53 AM
Simbah2004,
Yeah, I saw a few of your posts on this board :)

When are you planning on buying it? What kind of prices you seeing for it?

I've heard nothing but good things about this machine, and it seems that they may have upgraded some of its components, from what I've read around here.

cbegap
04-28-2004, 09:26 PM
I have a Laserfibre 200tt and love it. My advice is buy a respected brand from a reputable vendor. The Revo 400 looks like a solid machine. I got caught up in the lock-out vs constant pull question before I bought what I have. The bottom line is you need to be consistant. So if a lock-out reads 62 but is only really pulling 60, you will play with the racquet and adjust from there. The only time it becomes more of an issue is if someone gives you a racquet to string that had it strung before with a constant pull machine. You might consider pulling a pound or two or whatever extra to bring it up to where they are use to it. The trick is to be consistant. Find a method you enjoy and try and string that way all the time. Ie. don't double pull on some and then single pull other times etc. I'm sure you will enjoy whichever of these machines you decide to get.

sherpa78
05-03-2004, 09:12 PM
Hey fellas,
Well, looks like I am buying a LaserFibre 200TT w/ Single Action clamps from JWare (see his post). I figure this machine is going to be (if it isn't already) legendary, so I see it as an investment.

Simbah2004
05-09-2004, 09:51 PM
Sherpa78:
I'm buying a machine pretty soon. I can spend up to $600. Either the Revo 4000 or the Pioneer DC from Alpha. Most likely the Pioneer DC.
Good luck with your new machine, and sorry I didn't reply sooner.