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eliza
05-01-2011, 05:22 AM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....
So I am turning to you, curious about your thoughts.
Why you call "Roland Garros" French Open? And what about Rome (Internationali Bnl dÍtalia) ?
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................

mtr1
05-01-2011, 05:28 AM
I thought Roland Garros was the venue?

Darko
05-01-2011, 05:29 AM
South Africans call it the French Open as well.

But we get US commentary though. I think its the English speaking world that calls it the French.

GasquetGOAT
05-01-2011, 05:32 AM
I thought it's called the "Nadal Open", no?

Bartelby
05-01-2011, 05:33 AM
RG like Wimbledon must be the name of the club that 'produces' the event and hence it provides the name of the tournament or, at least, the name that the club chooses to give to the tournament it 'produces'.

With the AO and USO they are probably organised by national associations; and hence the title reflects an overtly national dimension.

The fact is that journalists probably don't think RG says tennis in quite the same way as Wimbledon does in the Anglosphere - and journalists control what we call things.

vsbabolat
05-01-2011, 05:48 AM
RG like Wimbledon must be the name of the club that 'produces' the event and hence it provides the name of the tournament or, at least, the name that the club chooses to give to the tournament it 'produces'.

With the AO and USO they are probably organised by national associations; and hence the title reflects an overtly national dimension.

The fact is that journalists probably don't think RG says tennis in quite the same way as Wimbledon does in the Anglosphere - and journalists control what we call things.

The Official name of the tournament is Les internationaux de France de Roland-Garros. The French just call it Roland Garros. Also it is competition thing with Wimbledon

So Before the advent of "Open" Tennis it was just referred to in English as the French Championships. Just like the U.S. Open was referred to as the U.S. Championships

Bartelby
05-01-2011, 05:54 AM
French Open is therefore a respectable translation.

Mustard
05-01-2011, 06:05 AM
Mats Wilander frequently calls it the French Open. I always see it as the French Open, which is currently played at Roland Garros. After all, it might move from Roland Garros at some point in the future. It very nearly did recently.

Bartelby
05-01-2011, 06:11 AM
Except that RG is a brand name, universally recognised in France as tennis, so it will never be just a stadium name.

vsbabolat
05-01-2011, 06:38 AM
Except that RG is a brand name, universally recognised in France as tennis, so it will never be just a stadium name.

The French Tennis Federation made it a Brand Name in the early 80's. Like Wimbledon they license out the name Roland Garros to create a nice revenue stream.

Cassius Clay
05-01-2011, 06:55 AM
And why do Americans say "awesome" instead of "smashing" ?

TheBoom
05-01-2011, 06:56 AM
I call it either or just depends on who i'm talking to i'm american btw

Joe Pike
05-01-2011, 07:02 AM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....
So I am turning to you, curious about your thoughts.
Why you call "Roland Garros" French Open? And what about Rome (Internationali Bnl dÍtalia) ?
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................


In Germany we say "French Open" as well.

vsbabolat
05-01-2011, 07:08 AM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....
So I am turning to you, curious about your thoughts.
Why you call "Roland Garros" French Open? And what about Rome (Internationali Bnl dÍtalia) ?
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................

Some people call the U.S. Open "Flushing Meadows". Rome used to be called the Italian Open before the whole Master Series thing came about.

Bartelby
05-01-2011, 07:09 AM
The new "Roland Garros" APDGT is up with that name on the racquet, but advertised as the French Open version by TW.

ollinger
05-01-2011, 07:20 AM
To enlarge the question, I've wondered why countries that share an alphabet can't share geographical names. Firenze becomes Florence, Munchen becomes Munich, Milano becomes Milan, odd we have to use different names. (I read once that Florence was originated in WW1 or WW2 by American soldiers who liked to give women's names to almost everything.)

vsbabolat
05-01-2011, 07:21 AM
The new "Roland Garros" APDGT is up with that name on the racquet, but advertised as the French Open version by TW.

Right. The FFT has everything branded as Roland Garros. That is how they want the tournament to be called.

jwbarrientos
05-01-2011, 07:22 AM
In Argentina we mostly call Roland Garros and for mostly of us is the biggest Slam.

Mustard
05-01-2011, 10:08 AM
So if the French Open were to move away from Roland Garros, some people would still call it Roland Garros? That's ridiculous.

pug
05-01-2011, 10:43 AM
And why do Americans say "awesome" instead of "smashing" ?

Without the accent, it sounds ridiculous! We may also resort to, "Freakin' Sweet!" when really impressed.

Great question.

glazkovss
05-01-2011, 10:49 AM
French Open is played at Roland Garros. As simple as that. Can be called either way.

drudra88
05-01-2011, 10:50 AM
I thought it's called the "Nadal Open", no?


hahaha..how funny!!!

Mainad
05-01-2011, 10:52 AM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....


Was this player a pro? What did he/she mean that European events are not important"?


So I am turning to you, curious about your thoughts.
Why you call "Roland Garros" French Open? And what about Rome (Internationali Bnl dÍtalia) ?
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................


I always thought 'French Open' was the official name and 'Roland Garros' the unofficial one because its the name of the venue.I 've heard the US Open referred to as 'Flushing Meadow' for the same reason.

sureshs
05-01-2011, 10:55 AM
RG like Wimbledon must be the name of the club that 'produces' the event and hence it provides the name of the tournament .

RG was a WWI fighter pilot

Mainad
05-01-2011, 10:57 AM
(I read once that Florence was originated in WW1 or WW2 by American soldiers who liked to give women's names to almost everything.)

Lol...I think Florence Nightingale would have disagreed with you.She was born in that city in 1820 and named after it!

sureshs
05-01-2011, 10:57 AM
Give me some freedom fries

SoCal10s
05-01-2011, 11:00 AM
what do everyone call the U.S. Open? --- US open...

cucio
05-01-2011, 11:09 AM
(I read once that Florence was originated in WW1 or WW2 by American soldiers who liked to give women's names to almost everything.)

Florence was founded by the Romans in the 59B.C. and called Florentia. Or, if one is to believe wikipedia, Florentia is a corruption of Fluentia.

Anyway, I guess at the time Romans were the major military power in the world, so you could say they were the Americans of the time. Their soldiers probably liked women too.

eliza
05-01-2011, 11:52 AM
The Official name of the tournament is Les internationaux de France de Roland-Garros. The French just call it Roland Garros. Also it is competition thing with Wimbledon

So Before the advent of "Open" Tennis it was just referred to in English as the French Championships. Just like the U.S. Open was referred to as the U.S. Championships

Thank you, very clear explanation. I know Roland Garros is the venue, but I never heard quoted any other way. The poster that says is a "journalistic thing"is probably right on!!!!

Do you think these events are "less important"for a tennis player? Maybe because on clay?

eliza
05-01-2011, 11:54 AM
Except that RG is a brand name, universally recognised in France as tennis, so it will never be just a stadium name.

100% right on, very powerful trade-mark.

Mustard
05-01-2011, 11:55 AM
Does it really matter? Call it the French Open/Roland Garros or the US Open/Flushing Meadows, we all know what it means.

eliza
05-01-2011, 11:59 AM
To enlarge the question, I've wondered why countries that share an alphabet can't share geographical names. Firenze becomes Florence, Munchen becomes Munich, Milano becomes Milan, odd we have to use different names. (I read once that Florence was originated in WW1 or WW2 by American soldiers who liked to give women's names to almost everything.)

I love languages, and found this very bizarre. It is like every country tries to make the other his/hers, by changing the names of cities. Except we Italians: otherwise NY should be Nuova Yorka, or Detroit Ditroita.....Los Angeles, Gli Angeli (that's cute).....

eliza
05-01-2011, 12:00 PM
Does it really matter? Call it the French Open/Roland Garros or the US Open/Flushing Meadows, we all know what it means.

No really, the discussion started with me keeping referring to Schiavone preparing for Roland Garros, and this guy keeping staring at me until he went: ohhh, you mean "the French Open".......

vsbabolat
05-01-2011, 12:10 PM
Thank you, very clear explanation. I know Roland Garros is the venue, but I never heard quoted any other way. The poster that says is a "journalistic thing"is probably right on!!!!

Do you think these events are "less important"for a tennis player? Maybe because on clay?

The FFT wants to brand it's Major as Roland Garros. But remember that the FFT last year threatened to move the Tournament out of Stade Roland Garros if it could not expand the sight. Also the French Championships have been going on before Stade Roland Garros was constructed in 1928. So the tournament really is the French Open. Roland Garros is the venue.
In Europe and South America the French Open or if you prefer Roland Garros is the most important tournament of the year. While in the U.S. it is Wimbledon and the U.S. Open that holds the most importance. Or if you live in Asia the Australian Open is the most important tournament on the calender.

Dilettante
05-01-2011, 12:31 PM
I though Americans called everything French: toasts, fries, kisses, and everything that the French didn't invent whatsoever.

So why not call French the French Open, that is really French.

sdont
05-01-2011, 12:42 PM
So if the French Open were to move away from Roland Garros, some people would still call it Roland Garros? That's ridiculous.

Roland Garros is not ony the name of the place, it's the trademark, and how everybody in France calls the tournament. There is no French translation for "French Open". Paris-Bercy is sometimes refered as l'Open de France but it's rare.

Ash_Smith
05-01-2011, 12:49 PM
RG like Wimbledon must be the name of the club that 'produces' the event and hence it provides the name of the tournament or, at least, the name that the club chooses to give to the tournament it 'produces'.
The fact is that journalists probably don't think RG says tennis in quite the same way as Wimbledon does in the Anglosphere - and journalists control what we call things.

Technically "Wimbledon" is actually "The Championships Wimbledon" (shortened from the original "The Lawn Tennis Championships") and the host club is "The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club"

The French Open was orignally the French Men's Singles Championship and later became "The French Internationals" when players outside of French clubs we allowed to enter. Roland Garros was indeed an aviator and the condition of building the new National Tennis Centre in 1928 was that it is was named after him. It is only in recent years that the French Championships have been heavily marketed as "Roland Garros" and around Europe the name "The French Open" is certainly us, propably initially as a simplification of "French Internationals".

There is a similar situation in Golf where in the US "The Open Championship" is called the "British Open" to distinguish it from the "US Open". This is entirely uneccessary as we all know that "The Open" is the original and best golf championship in the world and fully deserves its title!

Cheers

Ash

vsbabolat
05-01-2011, 12:59 PM
Roland Garros is not ony the name of the place, it's the trademark, and how everybody in France calls the tournament. There is no French translation for "French Open". Paris-Bercy is sometimes refered as l'Open de France but it's rare.

Stade Roland Garros is not the name of the 8.5 hectare 20 court facility. Paris-Bercy used to be called the Paris Open outside of France until the whole Master Series came along.

woodrow1029
05-01-2011, 01:37 PM
And why do Americans say "awesome" instead of "smashing" ?
Why do Brits say "smashing" instead of "awesome?"

Tsonga#1fan
05-01-2011, 02:04 PM
So if the French Open were to move away from Roland Garros, some people would still call it Roland Garros? That's ridiculous.

IMO, it's as ridiculous as the French naming the venue as they did. Roland Garros was a war hero or something and never had anything to do with tennis did he? But to be fair, when the USTA moved the USO to Flushing NY the first stadium court was named Louie Armstrong Stadium. Maybe the USTA should have refered to the USO as "Louie Armstrong"!

bluetrain4
05-01-2011, 02:11 PM
A big reason is because growing up, that's literally all you hear. Almost all American television commentaors and journalists refer to it as the "French Open". And, if no one corrects you, why would you say otherwise? Plus, the name makes "sense" when compared to US Open or Australian Open.

Rhino
05-01-2011, 02:14 PM
Roland Garros was a person. Kind of like calling Wimbledon "Tim Henman".

JustBob
05-01-2011, 02:17 PM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....


He obviously wanted to warn you about the "dumb ignorant American" stereotype in the unlikely event you ever met one.

Sentinel
05-02-2011, 12:57 AM
Why do Brits say "smashing" instead of "awesome?"
I thought we said "splendid".

Isn't Roland Garros that guy with a splendid one handed backhand who got booked for cocaine 2 years back. later turned out some doped girl snogged him.??

Netspirit
05-02-2011, 12:58 AM
Why do Americans say "French Fries"? There is nothing French about them.

Sentinel
05-02-2011, 01:03 AM
Why do Americans say "French Fries"? There is nothing French about them.
What's that game played on a clay court ?

Oh yes, Lawn Tennis !!

nadalbestclass
05-02-2011, 02:27 AM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....
So I am turning to you, curious about your thoughts.
Why you call "Roland Garros" French Open? And what about Rome (Internationali Bnl dÍtalia) ?
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................

Because Americans are xenophobic, no?

Just kidding, but people that generalize like that are lame. Mostly likely this person is trying to justify their bias, by hiding behind the common notion that all Americans are self obsessed and could care less about the rest of the world.

Gorecki
05-02-2011, 02:41 AM
ROFL x Pimpmyride

Herr Heuristically programmed algorithmic computer

Now that we found the real reason to why fedlovers like hardcourt season, being that lawn tennis is played on hard courts, they will fathom the existence Basket Case Roddick and stay home watching Bunny Wailer concerts

ps: i forgot to take my morning pills.

What's that game played on a clay court ?

Oh yes, Lawn Tennis !!

Sentinel
05-02-2011, 02:56 AM
Hello Dave ...
ROFL x Pimpmyride

Herr Heuristically programmed algorithmic computer

Now that we found the real reason to why fedlovers like hardcourt season, being that lawn tennis is played on hard courts, they will fathom the existence Basket Case Roddick and stay home watching Bunny Wailer concerts

ps: i forgot to take my morning pills.
Is Bunny Wailer another joke on Sunny Deol, like Honey Rambol. This is getting tough for my midget brain !! Honey Rambol had me in splits for half an hour, btw.
Waaait, this guys for real !!

On topic:
SW19 sounds cool. I just thought I'd share that.

pound cat
05-02-2011, 03:54 AM
I love languages, and found this very bizarre. It is like every country tries to make the other his/hers, by changing the names of cities. Except we Italians: otherwise NY should be Nuova Yorka, or Detroit Ditroita.....Los Angeles, Gli Angeli (that's cute).....

It seems that it's too much effort for people in a country where English is the official language to bother to speak the name of a foreign cities the way they are known in their country. There has always been a feeling of smug superiority in English speaking countries IMO and almost a pride in stumbling over and pointing out how silly difficult "foreign" words are to pronounce....and laughing at the names.


It's not Moscow...it's Moskva! No reson why English speakers people can't say that word.

Gorecki
05-02-2011, 04:16 AM
It seems that it's too much effort for people in a country where English is the official language to bother to speak the name of a foreign cities the way they are known in their country. There has always been a feeling of smug superiority in English speaking countries IMO and almost a pride in stumbling over and pointing out how silly difficult "foreign" words are to pronounce....and laughing at the names.


It's not Moscow...it's Moskva! No reson why English speakers people can't say that word.

i correct foregneirs every time i hear Oporto instead of Porto and Lisbon Instead of Lisboa...

Gorecki
05-02-2011, 04:18 AM
Hello Dave ...

Is Bunny Wailer another joke on Sunny Deol, like Honey Rambol. This is getting tough for my midget brain !! Honey Rambol had me in splits for half an hour, btw.
Waaait, this guys for real !!
On topic:
SW19 sounds cool. I just thought I'd share that.

never trust a Portuguese! :)

Gemini
05-02-2011, 04:27 AM
Yes. French Open isn't just an American thing. My Australian friends refer to it as the French Open as well...not that that's representative of all Australians. I usually refer to it as the French Open here in the U.S. but when I'm in Paris I tend to refer it as Roland Garros. Just a quirk.

But I the other posters have covered the reasons why it's referred to one of the other.

egn
05-02-2011, 06:36 AM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....
So I am turning to you, curious about your thoughts.
Why you call "Roland Garros" French Open? And what about Rome (Internationali Bnl dÍtalia) ?
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................

Do you call Wimbledon "The Championships"?

I use both interchangeably. French Open simply caught on because like US Open and Australian Open it just shows the location of the tournament. I disagree with American's thinking these events are not important, but it doesn't matter you'll have tons of European trash the US Open and say it is the least significant major, but each to their own. All four majors are important and frankly I call it Roland Garros but I prefer French Open as stated above Roland Garros is the venue name and not the actual event name.

El Diablo
05-02-2011, 07:20 AM
Netspirit
French fries are indeed french. The contemporary method for making fries (blanche first at about 325 degrees, fry later at about 375 degrees) is generally thought to have originated in the southern (i.e. French-speaking) part of Belgium, probably by people of French origins.

Bartelby
05-02-2011, 07:23 AM
If Wimbledon is put on by the All-England club then it would be somewhat politically problematic to say English Open.

eliza
05-02-2011, 11:48 AM
If Wimbledon is put on by the All-England club then it would be somewhat politically problematic to say English Open.

British Open???? LOL, thank you to all posters, life is beautiful because of differences......At least so I think.
Have a great day, hope you can play tennis wherever you are!!!

Mustard
05-02-2011, 11:51 AM
The worst Americanism of the English language is "I could care less". It's supposed to be I couldn't care less. And then there's the usage of the word "pants". In Britain, pants means underwear, not trousers like it does in the US.

Cassius Clay
05-02-2011, 12:17 PM
Because Americans are xenophobic, no?

Just kidding, but people that generalize like that are lame. Mostly likely this person is trying to justify their bias, by hiding behind the common notion that all Americans are self obsessed and could care less about the rest of the world.

And why do some Americans say "I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less"?

Cassius Clay
05-02-2011, 12:19 PM
The worst Americanism of the English language is "I could care less". It's supposed to be I couldn't care less. And then there's the usage of the word "pants". In Britain, pants means underwear, not trousers like it does in the US.

You beat me to it.

Mustard
05-02-2011, 12:29 PM
Just checked. Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand also use the word "pants" when referring to trousers, so it's not just in the US. If you used this term in Britain, it would raise eyebrows.

Limpinhitter
05-02-2011, 12:38 PM
Hello.
I had a discussion with an American player, who, not so kind, simply stated that Americans cannot care the less for European names, and besides these events are not "important".....
So I am turning to you, curious about your thoughts.
Why you call "Roland Garros" French Open? And what about Rome (Internationali Bnl dÍtalia) ?
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................

Roland Garros was a WWI French fighter pilot after whom the venue is named. The name of the tournament in English is The French Open. Calling The French Open Roland Garros would be like calling The U.S. Open Flushing Meadows Tennis Center.

Cassius Clay
05-02-2011, 12:45 PM
Just checked. Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand also use the word "pants" when referring to trousers, so it's not just in the US. If you used this term in Britain, it would raise eyebrows.

There are plenty more differences between USA/UK. The funniest ones that I can remember would be "fanny"(ass<>p u s s y), "f a g" (gay<>cigarette) and "rubber" (condom<>eraser)

eliza
05-02-2011, 01:26 PM
The worst Americanism of the English language is "I could care less". It's supposed to be I couldn't care less. And then there's the usage of the word "pants". In Britain, pants means underwear, not trousers like it does in the US.

Let's not go there, I got so used to hear here in MI : "he don't eat this", "she don't work at?", that I tremble thinking about working anywhere where English is actually spoken..........

Murrayfan31
05-02-2011, 01:27 PM
French Open just isn't that important to Americans. Only specific parts of Europe qualify this is an important slam.

Lawn Tennis
05-02-2011, 01:32 PM
The worst Americanism of the English language is "I could care less". It's supposed to be I couldn't care less. And then there's the usage of the word "pants". In Britain, pants means underwear, not trousers like it does in the US.

And why do some Americans say "I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less"?

Of course, one can still say "I could care less" and literally mean that there is margin available in which to care less.

MethodTennis
05-02-2011, 01:50 PM
french open where im from in the UK who cares tbh everyone knows what your talking about

Mainad
05-02-2011, 02:35 PM
There are plenty more differences between USA/UK. The funniest ones that I can remember would be "fanny"(ass<>p u s s y), "f a g" (gay<>cigarette) and "rubber" (condom<>eraser)

How about suspenders (US - supports for men's trousers,UK - supports to hold up women's stockings)?

When I was in a restaurant in Washington many years ago,my friends and I nearly fell about laughing when we heard some American guys on the next table talking about suspenders.We thought they must all be into some really kinky practices! :p

I once heard an anecdote about an American girl staying at a hotel in London and asking for an early morning call.The proprietor asked her what time she would like him "to knock her up"? :)

marc45
05-02-2011, 02:38 PM
I thought it's called the "Nadal Open", no?funny .......

Fee
05-02-2011, 02:48 PM
No really, the discussion started with me keeping referring to Schiavone preparing for Roland Garros, and this guy keeping staring at me until he went: ohhh, you mean "the French Open".......

Okay seriously, who is this stupid person you were talking to? He has no right to even attempt to speak on behalf of 'American players'.

pound cat
05-02-2011, 02:56 PM
And why do some Americans say "I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less"?


Why do most people now hsve no idea of how to use "less" and "fewer"


evolution of language happening before our eyes...scary, LOL

eliza
05-02-2011, 03:04 PM
Okay seriously, who is this stupid person you were talking to? He has no right to even attempt to speak on behalf of 'American players'.

Hi, Fee, how are you?
Well, I do not think he is so stupid, he won few championships at his level.....(or so they say)..........

Fee
05-02-2011, 03:11 PM
Hi, Fee, how are you?
Well, I do not think he is so stupid, he won few championships at his level.....(or so they say)..........

That just means he can play tennis. The words that you attributed to him in your very first post here make me wonder about his level of intelligence. He needs to stick to speaking for himself and not others.

From my experience, players will mostly refer to tournaments by the name of the city they are held in, not by the title because the sponsors/titles can change from year to year, it doesn't matter what country its in. I don't know anyone who calls Indian Wells or Miami by any other name.

nadalbestclass
05-02-2011, 03:25 PM
And why do some Americans say "I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less"?

haha, good point, never really thought about it. I suppose it's not something you would use in a formal setting, in which case it would be, "I could not care less". We have been known to butcher the language quite a bit!

sureshs
05-02-2011, 04:24 PM
Hi, Fee, how are you?
Well, I do not think he is so stupid, he won few championships at his level.....(or so they say)..........

You will be surprised that many good adult players in the US know very little about tennis, and actually don't watch it much at all. They play tennis at a good level, but prefer to watch other sports. Their knowledge of pro names, racquets, and tournaments is sketchy. Ask them about the NBA or NFL or PGA though, and they can give you a lecture for hours.

Manus Domini
05-02-2011, 04:53 PM
Well, Americans are odd, first off (I'm American, so I am 100% aware of this).

We misspell colour constantly as "color". Got a point docked on an English paper for spelling it with a 'u', once.

Centre is spelled "center"

Theatre becomes theater

grey becomes gray

Personally, I blame Webster for making his dictionary on the American language.

Mick
05-02-2011, 07:16 PM
haha. how about a "french kiss?"
i don't believe the french would call it like that in their language :)

Sentinel
05-02-2011, 08:47 PM
And why do some Americans say "I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less"?
Maybe cos they couldn't care less :confused:

eliza
05-03-2011, 03:39 AM
You will be surprised that many good adult players in the US know very little about tennis, and actually don't watch it much at all. They play tennis at a good level, but prefer to watch other sports. Their knowledge of pro names, racquets, and tournaments is sketchy. Ask them about the NBA or NFL or PGA though, and they can give you a lecture for hours.

I am shocked by your statement. How can you not love tennis, above all!!!!
What I did notice is that Teaching Pros (here) seem to have little capability of explaining the technical aspect of the shots/game.

Andres
05-03-2011, 04:17 AM
In Argentina we mostly call Roland Garros and for mostly of us is the biggest Slam.
Disagreed. I can give you that is the 2nd biggest slam in Argentina, but Wimbledon is Wimbledon.

fedfan08
05-03-2011, 04:31 AM
Just checked. Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand also use the word "pants" when referring to trousers, so it's not just in the US. If you used this term in Britain, it would raise eyebrows.And if someone used the word "jumper" here in the US no one would have a clue they're referring to a piece of clothing as we call them sweaters.

eliza
05-03-2011, 08:35 AM
Disagreed. I can give you that is the 2nd biggest slam in Argentina, but Wimbledon is Wimbledon.

Hola. I agree with the Argentine poster, to me Roland Garros is first, then Australian, then Roma, then Wimbledon (as this is on grass, who nowadays still plays on grass????), then the US Open ....

But, hey, as long as we can all have great tennis close to home (or a good channel, do not you hate abc that cuts the matches???), everything is good.

sureshs
05-03-2011, 08:57 AM
I am shocked by your statement. How can you not love tennis, above all!!!!
What I did notice is that Teaching Pros (here) seem to have little capability of explaining the technical aspect of the shots/game.

Love of tennis can be shown by playing it, not watching it. I think many pros also don't watch much tennis and have far less knowledge of tennis than posters here.

About teaching pros: being a big country, it depends on where you live. The mapping from small country to big country can be very deceptive. In a small place, many good things are concentrated in a small area. Same with rural to urban transition.

Fee
05-03-2011, 10:18 AM
And if someone used the word "jumper" here in the US no one would have a clue they're referring to a piece of clothing as we call them sweaters.

A jumper in the US is a piece of clothing, but it's not a sweater. It's a type of strappy dress, mostly worn by little girls, that is pulled over a tshirt. The straps will have buttons or snaps that attach to the front of the dress so that the size can be adjusted a little bit.

Here's one: http://thegloss.com/fashion/sweet-heart-rose-pleated-jumper-dress/

BreakPoint
05-03-2011, 11:52 AM
Hello.
Nobody I know calls the US Open any other way........................
Not true. Before 1978 (when the US Open moved venues), most people called it "Forest Hills" and not "US Open". Even today, many people call it "Flushing Meadows" instead of "US Open". A lot of Americans also refer to it simply as "The Open".

BreakPoint
05-03-2011, 11:57 AM
Oh, and Americans call it "French Open" because it's been the French Championships long before Roland Garros was ever built.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_French_Open_Men%27s_Singles_champions

Tyrus
05-03-2011, 11:57 AM
A jumper in the US is a piece of clothing, but it's not a sweater. It's a type of strappy dress, mostly worn by little girls, that is pulled over a tshirt. The straps will have buttons or snaps that attach to the front of the dress so that the size can be adjusted a little bit.

Here's one: http://thegloss.com/fashion/sweet-heart-rose-pleated-jumper-dress/

Wether we're American or British, we all put our PANTS on the same way every day.

tangerine
05-03-2011, 12:16 PM
Just kidding, but people that generalize like that are lame. Mostly likely this person is trying to justify their bias, by hiding behind the common notion that all Americans are self obsessed and could care less about the rest of the world.
That's how I read it too. It was kinda obvious.

I'm always amused how non-Americans are so obsessed with what Americans think about "their" tournaments/sports/etc. and how angry they get when we don't embrace "their" sports. Their insecurity is cute like that. :)

namelessone
05-03-2011, 12:32 PM
common notion that all Americans are self obsessed and could care less about the rest of the world.

They have that reputation for a reason me thinks.

Your post reminded me of this :)

http://bograma.ro/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/amer.jpg

/generalization.

Fee
05-03-2011, 12:58 PM
Wether we're American or British, we all put our PANTS on the same way every day.

pants, slacks, trousers, jeans, or dungarees?

aceX
05-03-2011, 01:22 PM
Australian Open... French Open... American Open?????

eliza
05-03-2011, 01:28 PM
They have that reputation for a reason me thinks.

Your post reminded me of this :)

http://bograma.ro/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/amer.jpg

/generalization.

Ahahahahah, this is ssoooo cute. Where is Italy? Oh, wait, is where they drink wine under the sun all day........

eliza
05-03-2011, 01:29 PM
That's how I read it too. It was kinda obvious.

I'm always amused how non-Americans are so obsessed with what Americans think about "their" tournaments/sports/etc. and how angry they get when we don't embrace "their" sports. Their insecurity is cute like that. :)

I could be very mean, but intelligence is refraining ....

cypher
05-03-2011, 01:31 PM
Your post reminded me of this :)

LOL that's brilliant.

Tyrus
05-03-2011, 05:27 PM
pants, slacks, trousers, jeans, or dungarees?

or underwear.

lolitsanasian
05-03-2011, 10:14 PM
I thought it's called the "Nadal Open", no?

Hahahaha, I like this one. +1 :)

jerriy
05-03-2011, 11:24 PM
Netspirit
French fries are indeed french. The contemporary method for making fries (blanche first at about 325 degrees, fry later at about 375 degrees) is generally thought to have originated in the southern (i.e. French-speaking) part of Belgium, probably by people of French origins.Don't be silly.

The French speaking Belgians are natives of Belgium. They are not of French origin any more than english-speaking Americans are of Canadian origin.

ledwix
05-03-2011, 11:27 PM
I'm American, and I usually say Roland Garros. If not, I say "the French" since that sounds cooler than the French Open.

MichaelNadal
05-03-2011, 11:30 PM
I'm American, and I usually say Roland Garros. If not, I say "the French" since that sounds cooler than the French Open.

I usually say "The French" too.

jerriy
05-03-2011, 11:33 PM
Roland Garros is in fact the very first open tennis championship of the grand slams.

In other words: it's the other two "opens" that are copycats.

French Open is the original open, therefore it is tennis's equivalent of "the open"
.

eliza
05-04-2011, 05:34 AM
Roland Garros is in fact the very first open tennis championship of the grand slams.

In other words: it's the other two "opens" that are copycats.

French Open is the original open, therefore it is tennis's equivalent of "the open"
.

This is what I thought, but I did not want to seem arrogant with my thin skinned American audience at the club. But I grew up on clay, and Europe is not (unfortunately) a heavy weight entity nowadays....
BTW, I bought my red RG T-Shirt, and will cheer Schiavone and Nadal.
Whatever you think, get your racquet and play hard!!!!!

Agassifan
05-04-2011, 09:27 AM
In India it is called the "French Open" too

FedEx23
05-04-2011, 09:47 AM
I'm going to start referring to the US Open as "Billie Jean" from now on... because really, who cares about the names that different people in different countries call tournaments?

And I don't use the word Moscow because I'm an arrogant American. That's just how I was taught. Sorry if I offended anyone.

li0scc0
05-04-2011, 09:58 AM
You will be surprised that many good adult players in the US know very little about tennis, and actually don't watch it much at all. They play tennis at a good level, but prefer to watch other sports. Their knowledge of pro names, racquets, and tournaments is sketchy. Ask them about the NBA or NFL or PGA though, and they can give you a lecture for hours.

You would be surprised how many good adult players in Europe know very little about tennis as well. Not unique to the US.

sureshs
05-04-2011, 10:27 AM
You would be surprised how many good adult players in Europe know very little about tennis as well. Not unique to the US.

Not surprising. Tennis channel shows rec players all over the world in their programs, and they all suck, wherever they are.

kiki
05-04-2011, 02:16 PM
I loved the big three names of Wimbledon,Roland Garros and Forest Hills.

Many used "Forest Hills" instead of "US Open", because it was glam and exciting.it sounded so much better than "Flushing Meadows", that everybody now says "US Open" but seldom "Flushing Meadows"

10ACE
05-04-2011, 02:19 PM
It's the French Open at Roland Garos.

10ACE
05-04-2011, 02:26 PM
The worst Americanism of the English language is "I could care less". It's supposed to be I couldn't care less. And then there's the usage of the word "pants". In Britain, pants means underwear, not trousers like it does in the US.

I could care less, but I am not going to

I couldn't care less

eliza
05-04-2011, 03:09 PM
I loved the big three names of Wimbledon,Roland Garros and Forest Hills.

Many used "Forest Hills" instead of "US Open", because it was glam and exciting.it sounded so much better than "Flushing Meadows", that everybody now says "US Open" but seldom "Flushing Meadows"

You know I love the sound of certain words in English, and "Flushing Meadows"to me sounds really sexy.....like ocean....
But I would settle for King open, too. Hail to the Queen of Tennis!!!

jerriy
05-04-2011, 10:11 PM
I loved the big three names of Wimbledon,Roland Garros and Forest Hills.

Many used "Forest Hills" instead of "US Open", because it was glam and exciting.it sounded so much better than "Flushing Meadows", that everybody now says "US Open" but seldom "Flushing Meadows"Actually that is exactly what happened.

Flushing Meadows IS the reason why the USTA or whoever the authority is, ended up making the "US open" (sans location) the official name of the tournament. Had the US open been continuously held at Forest Hills or had it moved to a place that has a more cool name instead of the unglamerous "Flushing Meadows" this wouldn't have happened and if the US Open hadn't happened the Australians wouldn't have got the idea to follow suit and officially name theirs in the same manner.

jerriy
05-04-2011, 10:16 PM
You know I love the sound of certain words in English, and "Flushing Meadows"to me sounds really sexy.....like ocean....
But I would settle for King open, too. Hail to the Queen of Tennis!!!In that case they might as well use her first name initials a.k.a "the BJ Open"

jerriy
05-04-2011, 10:24 PM
In fact until recently "Flushing Meadows" was used as part of the description of the tournament (you could see that term used by broadcasters and on newspapers and even on-court banners and what not.

It's only sometime in the middle of ninties that all reference to FM was wiped out, erased completely (probably due to recommendation of some marketing agency types :rolleyes:

ClarkC
05-04-2011, 10:29 PM
haha, good point, never really thought about it. I suppose it's not something you would use in a formal setting, in which case it would be, "I could not care less". We have been known to butcher the language quite a bit!

It has nothing to do with formal vs. informal settings. Intelligent people are in the habit of saying "I could not care less" in both settings while others say "I could care less" in both settings. I doubt that you could find a single person in the entire nation who says it the stupid way in informal settings but says it the correct way in formal settings.

ClarkC
05-04-2011, 10:35 PM
Titles such as French Open, U.S. Open, and Australian Open signify that the event is the biggest event held in that country. The Whootzit Stadium Championships sounds like the biggest event held all year at the Whootzit Stadium. That is true of dozens of tournaments.

Saying French Open, Italian Open, Canadian Open (yes, I still use all of these terms, Masters be damned) is a sign of respect for the prestige of these tournaments. Being just another stop on the Masters level is not the same as the Italian Opens of my youth, in which we watched the likes of Borg and Panatta and others battle for the second biggest clay title of the year.

eliza
05-05-2011, 04:06 AM
Yes, Clark, I think you are right in giving recognition to the various countries that gave us great events.
I grew up with Martina, Evert, Graf, Seles, Sanchez-Vicario, Sabatini.....It might be a glitz in my memory, but it was great tennis...

pound cat
05-05-2011, 05:00 AM
You know I love the sound of certain words in English, and "Flushing Meadows"to me sounds really sexy.....like ocean....
But I would settle for King open, too. Hail to the Queen of Tennis!!!


Flushing Meadows sounds like a gigantic septic tank to me.

septic tank
noun

An underground sewage-disposal tank in which a continuous flow of waste material is decomposed by anaerobic bacteria.

You'll never think of Flushing Meadows in the same way, Eliza.

kiki
05-05-2011, 01:09 PM
Actually that is exactly what happened.

Flushing Meadows IS the reason why the USTA or whoever the authority is, ended up making the "US open" (sans location) the official name of the tournament. Had the US open been continuously held at Forest Hills or had it moved to a place that has a more cool name instead of the unglamerous "Flushing Meadows" this wouldn't have happened and if the US Open hadn't happened the Australians wouldn't have got the idea to follow suit and officially name theirs in the same manner.

That´s probably true.Forest Hills was really classy ( OK, may be too much upper class while Flushing seems to me more popular, middle to lower class).I also loved "Kooyong" has MUCH MORE PERSONALITY than "Flinders Park".But times have changed, so all the glam is definitely lost...( I can´t understand all the excitment about such a stupid name like "Tennis Masters Series" )