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Funbun
05-09-2011, 05:11 PM
It just dawned on me; how would two different racquets play, assuming their specifications are exactly the same, but have different beam widths?

Say, for example, we have a K Pro Tour and a K Blade Tour, and both are customized to have the same specs; swingweight, balance, weight, (maybe twistweight?). How would they play differently? How would they play differently if their twistweights weren't, in fact, different?

Would they simply have different feel? Or would it be something else, like better control or power over the other? Or, less likely, more "spinability" than the other? Or more stability?

Regarding the two racquets, as they are made with slightly different materials (I think?), would material make a difference too? Would one have benefits over the other?

olliess
05-09-2011, 09:40 PM
It just dawned on me; how would two different racquets play, assuming their specifications are exactly the same, but have different beam widths?

Seems like there are too many variables to make much of a generalization.

The wider beam racquet would need to be thinner or made of material with a lower modulus, since the beam width is advantageous for stiffness. Conversely, a thinner beam racquet would need to be made of stiffer material to achieve the same overall stiffness. To get the same weight back in the wider beam model you might need to add some inert material, which could change the feel.

Some main advantages would be a greater freedom in design -- stiffness and weight could be more 'strategically' positioned in the frame, giving extra stability, power, or whatever for a given weight/swingweight/material strength.

Beyond that, I've never seen any systematic study of the difference in "feel" of racquets with different beam cross section shapes and or widths.

Agent Orynge
05-09-2011, 11:05 PM
To me, wider beams generally have stiffer feels, are less maneuverable, but are more stable.

olliess
05-09-2011, 11:47 PM
To me, wider beams generally have stiffer feels, are less maneuverable, but are more stable.

Yes, but wider beamed racquets are inherently stiffer (all else being equal). Are you comparing wider beam racquets with narrower beam racquets having the same headsize, stiffness, swingweight, twistweight, balance, just for starters?

Agent Orynge
05-09-2011, 11:52 PM
Nope, nothing theoretical, and no assumptions about equalization of factors.

I'm just making a generalization based on my experiences with different frames, but the results seem like common sense, to me. You can't deny there is an observable correlation here.

Agent Orynge
05-10-2011, 12:18 AM
Beyond that, I've never seen any systematic study of the difference in "feel" of racquets with different beam cross section shapes and or widths.

As far as "feel" goes, I don't think it's possible to produce objective facts about a concept that is inherently subjective. That is, unless, you coach professional players, in which case it's possible you know everything.

olliess
05-10-2011, 11:44 AM
Point is, a manufacturer might very well have the resources to hand a bunch of (pro) players a couple racquets that are the same in most respects except have different beam widths, and get their feedback (even if not blind tested, which would in any case be hard since the players could tell the difference by looking at the racquets). In fact, I would expect that they have done this. But I haven't seen any sort of white paper which discloses the results.

Meanwhile we as consumers only get to test thin beamed racquets which are almost exclusively small headed, heavy player's racquets -- and we compare these to thicker beamed, larger headed racquets which include everything from player's racquets to game improvement models. So, from my viewpoint, it's hard to tell what beam size inherently does to the feel.

Agent Orynge
05-10-2011, 11:55 AM
Actually, there's a small trend growing towards thin beams and larger heads. Look at the Prince EXO3 Tour series, for example, and the better part of the Donnay line. A fair number of those are pretty light.

LafayetteHitter
05-10-2011, 02:50 PM
I have always found that a thinner beamed frame has better ball pocketing characteristics.

mctennis
05-10-2011, 03:07 PM
I have always found that a thinner beamed frame has better ball pocketing characteristics.

I agree with this statement. I also think you get better feedback as well.