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View Full Version : My buddy urges me to adapt whenever I switch rackets, or


DeShaun
05-09-2011, 10:32 PM
that I should stop experimenting with different setups thinking this will result in significantly different performance outcomes. For the record, he is very good at adapting to whatever racket he happens to be swinging, even if, for instance, I hand him one of mine to hit with, he always settles in and starts grooving nice strokes after a few minutes, regardless of whatever he is hitting with. I consider him to be a polished 4.0 level player whereas I am a low 3.0. He prioritizes adapting to the racket over making it adapt to him. I contend that a sharp tool is better than a dull one, and certain setups simply provide advantages over others. And customizing a racket is not necessarily a bad thing, in my view, even if doing so discourages becoming better at adapting. Where do you guys come down on this friendly debate?

Agent Orynge
05-09-2011, 10:43 PM
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=378093

And so it begins again. I did say, once, that there's been no shortage of conversation over this particular topic.

Some would have you believe that there is 'no common frame of reference' between professional players and the rest of us mortals, and that we are incapable of judging equipment for ourselves. I simply recommend you do whatever feels good. Tennis is about having fun, after all.

paulorenzo
05-09-2011, 11:50 PM
i enjoy experimenting with setups and weights to see what feels right. but customization should come second to racquet selection, ie finding a frame that suits one's game. but i think the biggest difference-maker at the end of it all is the player, more so than the racquet and customization. i think a big reason as to why your friend adapts so well is because he's invested a lot of time into his stroke mechanic and tennis smarts— thus his 4.0 rating. so i say find a frame you like & that closely suits your style, slap on some strings that work for you, perhaps add some weight in some spots, then stick with it so you can concentrate on your game.

Rorsach
05-10-2011, 01:09 AM
You, by your own words, are a low 3.0.

Do you really think customising your racquet is giving you any advantage?

mctennis
05-10-2011, 02:22 PM
The best advantage I see for you is to take some lessons from a club pro and get better form and strokes. Leave the customizing alone for a while until you get better. Improving skills will make you better while messing with a racquet may make keep you at the same skill level with poor technique. Just my opinion.

Irvin
05-10-2011, 02:46 PM
...Where do you guys come down on this friendly debate?

Some people just don't want to keep it friendly do they. I think selecting the right frame for you is the best start but you can always fine tune the racket to you. You said you would hand your hitting partner one of your. So I think the best place to start is to match up all the racket you have now and leave them alone for a month doing nothing but playing with them. You can use this thread to match them up.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=378175

If at the end of a month you can identify what you want to change then do it. But keep track of what you do and how you like it.

But don't look for any big improvements. Customizing your rackets may may them feel a little better but I don't think you are going to see big improvements in your game.

Irvin

LeeD
05-10-2011, 05:34 PM
As a 3.0, you have no concept what works or doesn't. Just as any pro at a reputable tennis shop which racket to use based on your strokes you show him inside his shop.

DeShaun
05-10-2011, 08:08 PM
As a 3.0, you have no concept what works or doesn't. Just as any pro at a reputable tennis shop which racket to use based on your strokes you show him inside his shop.

If I have no concept of what works or what doesn't as regards trying different setups, how come my forehand became obviously less lethal and under less control-via-spin, while my backhand became much steadier and had more pop, after I added lead all the way from 9 to 3, with equal an amount under the butt cap?

DeShaun
05-10-2011, 08:15 PM
You, by your own words, are a low 3.0.

Do you really think customising your racquet is giving you any advantage?

It allowed me to stabilize my backhand wing, while costing me some control (swing speed) on my forehand side. The serve it neither added to, nor subtracted too much from. So, I found a setup w/my YTPP and the help of lead tape, which helped me cover a weakness by converting it darn near into a strength. The backhand grew from being highly error prone to a relatively strong stroke, but the forehand slipped from fast becoming a weapon to being merely a steady rally stroke. Volleys improved however, so on balance, the setup raised my overall game.

Datacipher
05-10-2011, 08:43 PM
I'm going to be really frank here. Don't listen to people on this forum, and quite honestly, you'd be better off not even reading it!

It fosters this techhead equipment mentality. IT IS the player, your buddy adjusts because he doesn't worry about it, and he knows that there are always so many variables that it's always up to the player to adapt. Find a reasonable set-up then stick with it! By reasonable, I mean something that seems OK. That's ALL You need. Don't worry about a few lbs of string tension (it varies day to day anyways, even hour to hour). Don't worry about a few grams of lead tape. It's YOU!

Even then, the temperature, the court, the surface, the humdity, etc etc etc etc will vary conditions wildly.

Your buddy is wise. Listen to him. Don't listen to people who tell you differently.

okdude1992
05-10-2011, 09:10 PM
I'm going to be really frank here. Don't listen to people on this forum, and quite honestly, you'd be better off not even reading it!

It fosters this techhead equipment mentality. IT IS the player, your buddy adjusts because he doesn't worry about it, and he knows that there are always so many variables that it's always up to the player to adapt. Find a reasonable set-up then stick with it! By reasonable, I mean something that seems OK. That's ALL You need. Don't worry about a few lbs of string tension (it varies day to day anyways, even hour to hour). Don't worry about a few grams of lead tape. It's YOU!

Even then, the temperature, the court, the surface, the humdity, etc etc etc etc will vary conditions wildly.

Your buddy is wise. Listen to him. Don't listen to people who tell you differently.
agreed 100%. besides the equipment itself, there is all the physical/technical stuff. Because you are a 3.0 your strokes probably vary a lot, shot to shot. on any given ball you have to worry about moving to the ball and putting yourself in good position, staying balanced, making clean contact ect. not to mention all the inernal factors that can tweak your game. like energy level, confidence, concentration. having to deal with all these different things, really makes the racket matter very little.

just go with whatever feels good, stick with it, and get some lessons

eidolonshinobi
05-10-2011, 09:43 PM
I'm going to be really frank here. Don't listen to people on this forum, and quite honestly, you'd be better off not even reading it!

It fosters this techhead equipment mentality. IT IS the player, your buddy adjusts because he doesn't worry about it, and he knows that there are always so many variables that it's always up to the player to adapt. Find a reasonable set-up then stick with it! By reasonable, I mean something that seems OK. That's ALL You need. Don't worry about a few lbs of string tension (it varies day to day anyways, even hour to hour). Don't worry about a few grams of lead tape. It's YOU!

Even then, the temperature, the court, the surface, the humdity, etc etc etc etc will vary conditions wildly.

Your buddy is wise. Listen to him. Don't listen to people who tell you differently.


+1
A lot of folks here are racketaholics, best to keep your distance from this section of the forums lol.

loosegroove
05-11-2011, 03:41 AM
It allowed me to stabilize my backhand wing, while costing me some control (swing speed) on my forehand side. The serve it neither added to, nor subtracted too much from. So, I found a setup w/my YTPP and the help of lead tape, which helped me cover a weakness by converting it darn near into a strength. The backhand grew from being highly error prone to a relatively strong stroke, but the forehand slipped from fast becoming a weapon to being merely a steady rally stroke. Volleys improved however, so on balance, the setup raised my overall game.

Sounds to me like you're actually doing more harm to your game and development. Now this is just speculation, but I assume this is what's happening:

You're a low 3.0 player. So maybe you had an okay forehand that you used to swing through, and a had terrible backhand that you chipped or basically blocked the ball back with poor form. Now you've added weight/increased the swingweight so much that you're no longer following through with your forehand as well as before, but your crappy backhand has improved since the added weight has made it better at bunting balls back. So now you've taken a stroke that you were actually developing (your forehand) and put it on the backburner in order to accommodate the poor form on the backhand side, leaving you with poor form on both sides. And in the long run your backhand will suffer too.

In the very short run this might suit you better, but all it's really doing is hindering your stroke development and technique. By most accounts, properly adding weight to the 3 and 9 position should make it that you hit a heavier ball with more topspin. The fact that your forehand has suffered makes me believe that you're no longer creating any racket head speed and you can't handle the new weight.

Obviously you can do whatever you want. But at your level, equipment is the least of your worries and customizing your racket is a bit ridiculous.