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Ziggy925
05-18-2011, 02:28 PM
I'm back in a tennis class this year - second year - and I'm wondering if it's time to shrink the headsize of my raquet.

I'm playing with an older 110, and I'm probably between a 2.5 and 3.0 on the ranking scale. My instuctor wants me to get a newer, lighter raquet, but we haven't talked about head size. At 63 I doubt I'm going to change my swing a whole lot, except that my followthrough is better than it was. I don't feel like I'm hitting the ball any harder, but my control is getting better. The ball still tends to arc over the net, and some of my balls go long. I was a bit frustrated yesterday when I lost two points going about a foot long when playing doubles.

Think I should stay with an oversize raquet, or start shrinking the size a bit? My gut says to stay at 110 with a newer raquet to allow for error, but if a smaller head will improve my game, I'm game.

Thanks

martin
05-18-2011, 02:58 PM
That's very personal but shrinking the headsize a little should not hurt.
Around 100 sq is a good headsize and is big enough and should give you a little more precision although a dense or open string pattern is a factor too.
I don't agree with a lighter racket. It's better to get a somewhat heavier racket with a lower swingweight and headlight balance(better for your arm and for your game)
You can always bump up the sw with leadtape at 12 o'clock.

tampa_edski
05-18-2011, 04:00 PM
headsize is overrate IMO. the drop from 110 to 100 is not a big difference. I like smaller heads, so I am biased, but I think a smaller hitting area makes you hit better.

Now, dropping from a 110 to a 90 or an old woodie (65 sq in) is a big drop...but in the end you have to ask yourself if you really feel the need to change. nothing wrong with 110 sq in.

Now, super oversized (135's) is just absured. :)

Timbo's hopeless slice
05-18-2011, 04:18 PM
i had a hit with a friend's Spaulding Davis Cup woodie last night and was amazed how easily I was hitting the ball.

The thing weighed a ton but the balance was fairly neutral and you could feel it flexing. It reminded me of my Biomimetic 200, actually!

Anyway, the point is, I wasn't having any trouble making clean contact playing my normal game and the head on that thing looked about the size of the ball!
One thing, how heavy is your current racquet? If it is a 110, they are usually pretty light already...

Fuji
05-18-2011, 05:20 PM
Play with whatever is comfortable! :) As long as you don't get any pain from your racket, then I believe that is the main thing. Most other things can be adjusted.

A smaller head I believe will improve your game overall if you have the time to work with it. If your only playing once or twice a week, then I believe that your OS might be good for you, if you planning to pick up the sport more seriously, then a smaller headsize may be in your future!

I've fluctuated between 100sq inch and 88sq inches. 93-95 is my happy medium for the most part. It's all about what you want from your game. More control with longer/better strokes, then head smaller, more power? Get a bigger headsize or stay with your OS! :)

Have fun! Demoing can be your best option in these situations!

-Fuji

magnut
05-18-2011, 05:45 PM
Smaller heads give you more control and better feel. You have to have pretty good hands and this brings better ability to feel out your oponents..... What they like....what they dont. In the end it makes you more versitile while performing and more creative.

Larger heads are better for sheer power but can also make you somwhat sloppy. People who have larger head sizes tend to go for the quick kills more instead of appreciating the situation.

My suggestion is to go with a mid plus type head size and try to get the best of both worlds.

If you just have to try a really small head dont go do anything drastic. I would recommend you just soak your head in some really cold water until you get it the size you want. Its only temporary though so you have to get to work fast. The plus side though is that its not permanent and eventually your head size will go back to its normal.

got spin?
05-18-2011, 06:21 PM
stay in the upper midplus range, no lower than 98, no higher than 107, the radical OS or Speed light would be good.

Ziggy925
05-18-2011, 06:30 PM
If you just have to try a really small head dont go do anything drastic. I would recommend you just soak your head in some really cold water until you get it the size you want. Its only temporary though so you have to get to work fast. The plus side though is that its not permanent and eventually your head size will go back to its normal.

I'll give it a try. :-? Seriously, I do have a heavier graphite raquet with a smaller head I can try.

FYI, I doubt I'll be able to play more than twice a week, but I can get to the court just about anytime with access to a ball machine. I want the ability to play with someone I don't know and not dissapoint them. Lower my game to play with a novice or have sets with better players where I'm winning at least 4 games. That's my goal, and I'm not sure how much a racquet is going to make in my improvement.

I do know what the difference is playability wise with a small vs. a larger head -- power vs. control. I guess I want to know if changing head size will push you one way or the other? Or, does your game have to change before you would want to change head size? In other words, does a larger head size hold back your improvement?

LeeD
05-18-2011, 06:31 PM
I'm 62, have played in over 15 A/Open tourneys, and did well, but did not win in 2 Q's.
Nothing wrong with 110, or 115's if you lack swing speed. If you can swing as fast as a 20 year old, a smaller racket is more precise and accurate.
In the last 6 years, I've gone from 110 extended to 115's Xtralong to 97 mid to 95 mid to 100 slightly stiff tweeners.
Basically, the racketsize can be judged by your ability to swing the racket fast enough to hit ball as hard as you need. Bigger rackets accomodate slower swingspeeds and viceaversa.
If you eyesight and movement is also declining....both mine dropped easily 30 % from 30 years ago, a bigger hoop allows solid contact while moving and/or tired.

magnut
05-18-2011, 06:41 PM
I'll give it a try. :-? Seriously, I do have a heavier graphite raquet with a smaller head I can try.

FYI, I doubt I'll be able to play more than twice a week, but I can get to the court just about anytime with access to a ball machine. I want the ability to play with someone I don't know and not dissapoint them. Lower my game to play with a novice or have sets with better players where I'm winning at least 4 games. That's my goal, and I'm not sure how much a racquet is going to make in my improvement.

I do know what the difference is playability wise with a small vs. a larger head -- power vs. control. I guess I want to know if changing head size will push you one way or the other? Or, does your game have to change before you would want to change head size? In other words, does a larger head size hold back your improvement?

Honestly at your age I would not worry all that much about head size. Its more important that you get up the energy to perform. A good partner should understand this. I understand your feelings though. There are many people I would love to go play with that I dont know. I think its all in the way you approach them and introduce yourself. Thats what I learned in my younger and more energetic years anyways. Sometimes you have to be patient as well. If they turn you down dont take it personally. There are plenty of fish in the sea so to speak.

rufusbgood
05-18-2011, 06:43 PM
I'm back in a tennis class this year - second year - and I'm wondering if it's time to shrink the headsize of my raquet.

I'm playing with an older 110, and I'm probably between a 2.5 and 3.0 on the ranking scale. My instuctor wants me to get a newer, lighter raquet, but we haven't talked about head size. At 63 I doubt I'm going to change my swing a whole lot, except that my followthrough is better than it was. I don't feel like I'm hitting the ball any harder, but my control is getting better. The ball still tends to arc over the net, and some of my balls go long. I was a bit frustrated yesterday when I lost two points going about a foot long when playing doubles.

Think I should stay with an oversize raquet, or start shrinking the size a bit? My gut says to stay at 110 with a newer raquet to allow for error, but if a smaller head will improve my game, I'm game.

Thanks

Question 1: This instructor who wants you to get a newer, lighter racquet. Is he selling racquets?

Question 2: You've described your racquet as an "older 110". Could you perhaps give us the make and model? For instance, if you said to me you are playing with a Prince Woodie I would be inclined to agree with your instructor.

tailofdog
05-18-2011, 07:52 PM
I'll give it a try. :-? Seriously, I do have a heavier graphite raquet with a smaller head I can try.

FYI, I doubt I'll be able to play more than twice a week, but I can get to the court just about anytime with access to a ball machine. I want the ability to play with someone I don't know and not dissapoint them. Lower my game to play with a novice or have sets with better players where I'm winning at least 4 games. That's my goal, and I'm not sure how much a racquet is going to make in my improvement.

I do know what the difference is playability wise with a small vs. a larger head -- power vs. control. I guess I want to know if changing head size will push you one way or the other? Or, does your game have to change before you would want to change head size? In other words, does a larger head size hold back your improvement?
I will turn 63 in less than a month and have recently lost strength and can't use my 12 oz racquet effectively. I now use an 11oz 100 (LOW TO MEDIUM POWER SCALE) Racquet. It allows me to swing faster.
I think the key to every thing is, can you swing hard while being loose and bring the ball in? That is really the point.
There was a review by TW Chris that will be posted on the new Prince Silver 115 that claims some pretty special results from this racquet. I never heard him make these claims before so, it might be worth investigating.

Buckethead
05-18-2011, 07:54 PM
I'm back in a tennis class this year - second year - and I'm wondering if it's time to shrink the headsize of my raquet.

I'm playing with an older 110, and I'm probably between a 2.5 and 3.0 on the ranking scale. My instuctor wants me to get a newer, lighter raquet, but we haven't talked about head size. At 63 I doubt I'm going to change my swing a whole lot, except that my followthrough is better than it was. I don't feel like I'm hitting the ball any harder, but my control is getting better. The ball still tends to arc over the net, and some of my balls go long. I was a bit frustrated yesterday when I lost two points going about a foot long when playing doubles.

Think I should stay with an oversize raquet, or start shrinking the size a bit? My gut says to stay at 110 with a newer raquet to allow for error, but if a smaller head will improve my game, I'm game.

Thanks

Stay with the big head size, you are older, so extra power , light racket will help you be better.
I played 2 sets against this Sr guy last Sunday He was very good I'd say at least 5.0, using Yonex EZONE 107. He had a massive kick serve, the ball was jumping all over, hard to control his 2nd, his ground were good and solid, but I could run more, that is why He it was 1x1, other wise He would have beaten me.
Stay with what you got or go with the EZONE Rally, cheap and looks to be a real good racket,.

Ziggy925
05-19-2011, 08:06 AM
Here's some more info for you guys:

The raquet is a Prince CTS Approach 110, and it weighs about 11.5 oz strung (did this on a good kitchen scale). And, yes, the instructor will sell me a raquet at a substantial discount. She's a "Wilson" girl so that's what she has. Most of the raquets she sells to students are last years models. I would be able to play with it before buying.

Hmmm. Looks like Federer plays with a 12.5 oz raquet, however a new Wilson K Factor (115) weighs only 9.5 oz. Is that a big difference? Seems to me, according to my math, you would be swinging an extra 12 lbs every 100 swings with the heavier raquet. I assume that can really add up over a couple of hours.

Irvin
05-19-2011, 08:28 AM
Enjoy the game with what you have, there is nothing wrong with your racket.

Irvin

Ziggy925
05-19-2011, 11:18 AM
Enjoy the game with what you have, there is nothing wrong with your racket.

Irvin

I get it, and I'm sure you are right. But, is my theory correct about those couple of ounces adding up over a match?

Ziggy925
05-19-2011, 12:12 PM
I get it, and I'm sure you are right. But, is my theory correct about those couple of ounces adding up over a match?

I just read another article about raquet weight, and if I keep going at this rate I'll drive myself crazy. Seems like another couple of ounces won't make a big difference during a match, except for the fact that a lighter racquet would deliver a bit more shock back to my arm, all other things being equal.

If my instructor, or TW, has the same size raquet I can try that's lighter, the best thing is to play with it and just see how it feels. At this point in my tennis "career" I'm having fun, even with my old raquet, and IMHO that's what's important. :)

olliess
05-19-2011, 12:15 PM
12.5 oz is almost 25% more than 9.5 oz, so yeah, that will add up over the course of a single swing.

Those are both pretty extreme numbers for average male players these days, though.

Hewex
05-19-2011, 12:24 PM
Based on what you've written, I'd just go with a racquet you like, regardless. It 'sounds' like you are looking for lighter because someone told you that you should. I'd stay with what feels comfortable to you.

rufusbgood
05-19-2011, 08:03 PM
Here's some more info for you guys:

The raquet is a Prince CTS Approach 110, and it weighs about 11.5 oz strung (did this on a good kitchen scale). And, yes, the instructor will sell me a raquet at a substantial discount. She's a "Wilson" girl so that's what she has. Most of the raquets she sells to students are last years models. I would be able to play with it before buying.



The CTS Approach is a lovely racquet. Unless you are having difficulty hanging onto it physically (how's your hand strength?), or it isn't the correct grip size for you, there are as many disadvantages to switching to something lighter as there are advantages. Unless the lady pro is cute as the dickens, I'd be inclined to stick with it.

BTW, how long has it been since this racquet was last strung?

Ziggy925
05-24-2011, 07:49 PM
The CTS Approach is a lovely racquet. Unless you are having difficulty hanging onto it physically (how's your hand strength?), or it isn't the correct grip size for you, there are as many disadvantages to switching to something lighter as there are advantages. Unless the lady pro is cute as the dickens, I'd be inclined to stick with it.

BTW, how long has it been since this racquet was last strung?

It was raining today, so I only had a chance to swing the Wilson. I kinda like the feel of the CTX better, but I'll know more when I get to play with the Wilson.

As for when the CTX was last strung I have no idea. Do you think a fresh stringing would make a difference? I got the racquet used as is. Just replaced the original grip with two overwraps. Maybe that's why I like the feel.

rst
12-23-2012, 12:41 AM
Looks like Federer plays with a 12.5 oz raquet, however a new Wilson K Factor (115) weighs only 9.5 oz. Is that a big difference? Seems to me, according to my math, you would be swinging an extra 12 lbs every 100 swings with the heavier raquet. I assume that can really add up over a couple of hours..........

i guess if your fitness theshhold was at thte level that 12 pounds over 100 swings in a match....about 3 or 4 games usually?? with rest in between......it might make a difference.

rst
12-23-2012, 12:51 AM
My instuctor wants me to get a newer, lighter raquet, but we haven't talked about head size.


i have hit with several rackets an dont find headsize to matter much....its more a matter of the head size blended with other racket characteristics that make it right for your game.

i wouldnt use headsize as a limiter to any racket purchase.

my preference is 99 squin on the thin, light, near equal balanced donnay X rackets at low 50 tension.

if you already swing a light racket, sub 10.5 ounce, i find that most rackets 95 squin and below are on the heavier side i assume because of claimed sweetspot issues?? so most of what you try will be 95 or above.

rst
12-23-2012, 12:54 AM
I would recommend you just soak your head in some really cold water until you get it the size you want.............

so 10 below has done wonders for you??

rst
12-24-2012, 12:00 AM
and I'm wondering if it's time to shrink the headsize of my raquet..................

why would it ever to be time to shrink headsize fo rheadsizes sake??

rst
12-24-2012, 12:01 AM
are yo uunsatisfied with you current level of performance with your current headsize??

it may be lack of something else other than headsize.

robbo1970
12-24-2012, 02:51 AM
I would sayt hat the feel of the racket is more important than headsize. I have used 90's, 93's, 100's and 105's and the headsize was never my reason to try something different, it was the feel of the racket. I am now settled on a 98, but the headsize is almost irrelevant, its the feel of the racket that is right.

Mick3391
12-24-2012, 06:59 AM
I'm back in a tennis class this year - second year - and I'm wondering if it's time to shrink the headsize of my raquet.

I'm playing with an older 110, and I'm probably between a 2.5 and 3.0 on the ranking scale. My instuctor wants me to get a newer, lighter raquet, but we haven't talked about head size. At 63 I doubt I'm going to change my swing a whole lot, except that my followthrough is better than it was. I don't feel like I'm hitting the ball any harder, but my control is getting better. The ball still tends to arc over the net, and some of my balls go long. I was a bit frustrated yesterday when I lost two points going about a foot long when playing doubles.

Think I should stay with an oversize raquet, or start shrinking the size a bit? My gut says to stay at 110 with a newer raquet to allow for error, but if a smaller head will improve my game, I'm game.

Thanks

Hey Demo racquets! The K-Factor 95 is wide, so you get the benefit of spin potential with accuracy and plow through of a 90 as they are about the same weight, but it's up to you, demo them!

Prodigy1234
12-24-2012, 08:55 AM
Hey Demo racquets! The K-Factor 95 is wide, so you get the benefit of spin potential with accuracy and plow through of a 90 as they are about the same weight, but it's up to you, demo them!

Are you really going to recommend a K-Factor 95 to a 2.5-3.0 player? This would be an insanely large racket jump going from a midweight OS to a heavier midplus.
:confused::shock:

BlueB
12-24-2012, 09:46 AM
The bottom line is that she's selling you a racquet... I've been through that few times. My former coach went: "Oh that looks outdated..." talking at my POG 4-stripe OS, which had brand new strings and grip. I gave 2 of my other POGs to my big strong nephew, who used to play with a lightweight aluminum Wilson. He's coach complained to his dad that he allows son to play with a "picket fence plank" (boy then went to the runner up in the next tournament he played). The same coach sold an aluminum (under fancy paintjob) Technifibre to my younger niece. He also sold her poly strings without mentioning they need to be changed often. Poor girl still plays with the same dead strings more than a year later, as she doesn't quite believe me... :(
My point is, don't always trust the coaches, use your brain too...

Your racquet, at 11.5 oz, is pretty much ideal. It's a nice mid weight racquet. If it feels comfy, why change? 107 head size is not gigantic. As you said yourself, you won't get any stronger or faster, you can only benefit from the head size you've got. Plus, it probably can generate more spin then a smaller head.
If uou really wanted to try it a bit lighter, drop the leather grip (I assume it has one like most of older Prince) and use only 2 overgrips. That's an insant 15-20g weight drop. Balance would change to less HL, but would still be HL, as the most of the older Prince are plenty HL...

Oh, almost forgot, to me, most of Prince racquets fell more comfy then most of Wilson sticks...

Restring that stick of yours and do it every 6 to 20 hrs of play, depending on what type of string you use (except nat gut, which need to be replaced only when it brakes). Nothing like a new fresh string!