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View Full Version : Any one own or used to own or operate a tennis retail store


the green god
06-26-2005, 02:34 PM
I am thinking of opening my own and would like to ask some questions.

Please go to my profile and email me.

Any help will be apprieciated

Indiantwist
06-26-2005, 03:08 PM
i wish you all success in your endeavour.

I cant help you with the shop stuff but i can definitely help you in one area. Please let me know when you are ready to sell me the latest racquet with down to earth price.

krnboijunsung
06-26-2005, 04:16 PM
I wish there was a tennis specialty store around here.

krnboijunsung
06-26-2005, 04:16 PM
oh and good luck too.

Brad VanHorn
06-26-2005, 05:01 PM
Yes, good luck. I was having a similar thought today while I was stringing a couple racquets. I'll probably retire from the service in another couple years, and I'm undecided on what I want to do when that time comes. I was thinking I'd be interested in running a pro shop, but I've no idea what it takes to start and run my own business. I might try to find a club to work at for a year or so, then if I'm still interested in my own shop I can find the financing to get it going. I wish you well, and would love to hear how your venture turns out.

Kirko
06-26-2005, 05:14 PM
don't run a pro shop, but have been going to the same one since 1965 on and off have lived aloty of different places. This place stands alone now in St. Louis. They survived all the "pop" up stores during the tennis boom. I think their expert stringing and "down to earth" advice made them. They are now building a new store with a pratice court where you can actually "test drive" a demo on the spot about 4 miles from where I live now. I can't wait. Upshot they understand tennis and know how to treat anyone who comes thru the door of their shop with defference and respect.

goober
06-26-2005, 05:54 PM
I agree Kirko, if you want to run a pro shop make sure you are good at stringing or have good stringers, treat customers well (as in any business), make sure you know what you are talking about. Nothing is more disconcerting than when it is obvious you know more than the person at the proshop who is trying to give you advice.

the green god
06-26-2005, 06:28 PM
Thanks for all the kind words and support. I live in a city/metro area of around 200,000 people. And there are only two stores of this type and it is done as an afterthought. Just trying to get a handle on start up costs and such. I am sure it could be reasonably successful it is just a matter of getting up enough nerve to take the plunge.

LogicSound
06-26-2005, 06:29 PM
Make sure you put the buisness in an area with good foot traffic, as well as accessing it by car. I know a pro shop doesn't have to be big, but fitting well enough for customers to spread there legs, umm if your going to be running the store please dont crowd the customer, and try to force racquets on them. If you can put your store near a tennis court or infact build a wall to bounce the ball off for demo's that would be cool. be friends with your customers and they'll always come back. your going to need to buy in Bulk to get the racquets at a cheaper price! you also have to compete with other tennis distributors that have been there before you, who already have contracts with certain racquet makers, Ie Wilson, prince, head. well good luck, !!!PARKING AND CUSTOMER SERVICE ARE KEY!!!

LogicSound
06-26-2005, 06:32 PM
Thanks for all the kind words and support. I live in a city/metro area of around 200,000 people. And there are only two stores of this type and it is done as an afterthought. Just trying to get a handle on start up costs and such. I am sure it could be reasonably successful it is just a matter of getting up enough nerve to take the plunge.

start up costs think about spending 50k-120,000K remember the first year your in buisness nobody will know who you are. and profit wont come in very quick, mostly first year is when you make your money back, and then reinvest it back into your company for more merchandise.

fishuuuuu
06-26-2005, 06:46 PM
Whenever the pro shop opened up around here ... for the first two years they attracted my business exceptionally well by offering 20% discounts (on racquets, strings, etc...) to the local kids who had student ID to prove they lived in the local area.

lude popper
06-26-2005, 07:29 PM
Find David Palvich -- He's Got The Beta, All Of It

anirut
06-26-2005, 07:56 PM
I have a similar idea too, but bigger investments as in a tennis club. Anyway, good luck in your ventures.

A little suggestion: find this book "Creating Demand" by Richard Ott. It's old, 1992, published by "Business One Irwin" in Illinois. ISBN 1-55623-560-7.

You can generate a lot of ideas from the book. Good luck, mate.

BeeVee
06-27-2005, 01:31 PM
I love the wall idea. I'd definitely visit a tennis store that their own hitting facilities on the premises.

ipod-upod
06-28-2005, 07:38 PM
The Chicago Tennis (& Golf) store has a small room about half scale that has a small ball machine and all their racquets for demos. Pretty cool. I don't think it would cost much unless space was a premium.