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a0f6459
05-31-2011, 11:50 AM
Hi,

I was a varsity high school tennis player in the 90s and played with the Prince CTS Approach 110 since the age of 13. (17 guage synthetic string) After high school I pretty much stopped playing all together. Now in my early 30s, I want to get back into the sport that used to be my life when I was younger.

Reading through this forum I realized how much has changed and I don't even know how to begin to filter down to the rackets I should demo. I know that there will not be any racket like the Approach out there, but for the sake of reference on any recommendations I might receive, it is pretty much the only racket that I have ever known and liked compared to other popular rackets in that era. (meaning comparable stiffness, weight, feel etc. are fine with me)

I am a pure baseliner that only comes up to the net if a short ball brings me there. On my strokes I do not kill the ball, but have solid shots with medium topspin to keep the ball deep, moving opponents side to side until I get a short ball to kill. I am more of a counterpuncher and like pace from my opponents.

I'm thinking a tweener racket with a 100 head would probably suit me well, but that is the extent of my criteria search.

Any help from any posters that remember the CTS Approach from back in the day would be appreciated.

Thanks

AceServer
05-31-2011, 12:53 PM
Pure Drive GT, but that might be a bit stiff on your arm.
Head Instincts could do, since it has nice pop and control.
I also recommend any Dunlop 500 Tours.

eliza
05-31-2011, 01:06 PM
I envy you, think about all the possibilities......
Careful with the GT, I see many actually say the Cortex is 1,000 times better.....Dunlops are nice, too.

LeeD
05-31-2011, 01:15 PM
Rackets nowadaze are cheap. If you cannot afford a couple a year, how can you possibly afford to pay for tennis balls, shoes, and overgrips?
Demo if you can, but anything a good player can use, you can use.
The search for the ideal racket is eternal, so don't try to find the perfect one the first time....it just won't happen.
Changing rackets can be fun, or it can be a bore.
Almost every poster here uses a different racket, and we claim it's the best we have found so far.....

a0f6459
05-31-2011, 01:28 PM
I'm not sure what affording anything has to do with it. I never mentioned price as a problem. Of course I can demo everything to death, but this is not what I want to do. I'm not looking for the perfect racket, just some suggestions from knowledgable posters who are up to date to just get me started.


I have no problem with my racket except that it was made in 1988! Much has changed since then. A bigger issue is not being able to find grommets and bumper guards to replace.

Thanks for the suggestions. Are there any more to check out for baseline play?

Also forgot to mention that I hit a two handed backhand consistent with my forehand type of swing.

Also, about stiffness, I read that the approach was pretty stiff, but I can't find any specs. I'm wondering if it is stiffer than any of these new supposedly stiff rackets? If this is the case, I shouldn't have any problem with what is now categorized as stiff. (not sure though)

tennis9874
05-31-2011, 01:47 PM
If you want a stiff racket i think you should go with the Wilson BLX series. I have tried some of them and found them very stiff and as i am more a touch oriented player i hated them, but i think it would be a good option for you as a baseliner.:)

prjacobs
05-31-2011, 02:32 PM
The dunlop 500 series is very stiff. I also came back after not playing for a while and although the dunlop 4D 500 tour worked well, it hurt my shoulder. I think the flex of your CTS Oversize was 65, weight, 12.5 ounces, unstrung. (That's the info I saw online, but I can't vouch for the source). If you can demo from TW, that's such a good way to try out frames. 4 for $20. You keep them for a week and send them back in their box.

Hewex
05-31-2011, 02:34 PM
The Ksurge's are a good starting point.

LeeD
05-31-2011, 03:44 PM
That's a long time ago, the Approach.
Wasn't it's brethren the Blast and the Precision? The Approach was in the middle, I played with the Blast. The Precision, I could not hit hard shots, compared to the Blast.
So maybe your racket wasn't all that stiff.
Biggest question is whether you can hit with a 100, or do you really need the bigger hoops.
I'd demo an BabsCortex and a Dunlop500T, between the two you account for a lot of holes.

blrmkr
05-31-2011, 03:45 PM
I played with the exact same racquet back in the 90's and loved it. Got back into the game 3 yrs. ago and fell in love with the Prince speedport pro white. Stocked up on them because they are no longer made.

A few weeks ago I thought I would look at some newer technology from some different manufacturers. The racquet that came closest was another Prince. The Black Team felt very similar. Might want to demo it.

VGP
05-31-2011, 04:08 PM
Rackets haven't changed that much. Go to e-bay or check the TTW classifieds and pick up another Prince CTS Approach 110 or Oversize for less than $50. Just make sure the plastic parts are in good shape.

Use the money you'd save for strings and/or lessons to get yourself going again.

eyeball
05-31-2011, 05:08 PM
if you can, test some of the 95-98 sq/in players rackets that are close to 12oz.
It's not like you're a beginner and you're not 13 any more either. you might find something you like.

magnut
05-31-2011, 05:15 PM
Rackets haven't changed that much. Go to e-bay or check the TTW classifieds and pick up another Prince CTS Approach 110 or Oversize for less than $50. Just make sure the plastic parts are in good shape.

Use the money you'd save for strings and/or lessons to get yourself going again.

Follow this advice. Buy another CTS Approach. Racquets dont decay or have a shelf life. If the CTS Approach feel good then track down that racquet.

I am not impressed with the feel of modern racquets and the frames I use have long been discontinued. I remeber the CTS Approach and Precision very well. They were good sticks.

hrstrat57
05-31-2011, 05:32 PM
Rackets haven't changed that much. Go to e-bay or check the TTW classifieds and pick up another Prince CTS Approach 110 or Oversize for less than $50. Just make sure the plastic parts are in good shape.

Use the money you'd save for strings and/or lessons to get yourself going again.

Agree, good frame.

There was one in the local consignment shop near me a few weeks ago for $10 I believe.

If you must have newer frames I would recco a couple of 107 Head Radical's would make you smile.

Highly recommend the ti Radical (made in austria) they are on da bay all the time for $75 or less, great, great frame.

roundiesee
05-31-2011, 06:35 PM
I know of a lot of people who would kill to have one of those (Prince CTS Approach I mean), myself included! :) Follow VGP's advice, but if you are itching to try out newer frames, then any tweener weighing roughly 11oz should do nicely for you; be careful of stiff rackets though cos the last thing you want after such a long lay-off is to get an injury. Good Luck!

Buckethead
05-31-2011, 06:40 PM
Hi,

I was a varsity high school tennis player in the 90s and played with the Prince CTS Approach 110 since the age of 13. (17 guage synthetic string) After high school I pretty much stopped playing all together. Now in my early 30s, I want to get back into the sport that used to be my life when I was younger.

Reading through this forum I realized how much has changed and I don't even know how to begin to filter down to the rackets I should demo. I know that there will not be any racket like the Approach out there, but for the sake of reference on any recommendations I might receive, it is pretty much the only racket that I have ever known and liked compared to other popular rackets in that era. (meaning comparable stiffness, weight, feel etc. are fine with me)

I am a pure baseliner that only comes up to the net if a short ball brings me there. On my strokes I do not kill the ball, but have solid shots with medium topspin to keep the ball deep, moving opponents side to side until I get a short ball to kill. I am more of a counterpuncher and like pace from my opponents.

I'm thinking a tweener racket with a 100 head would probably suit me well, but that is the extent of my criteria search.

Any help from any posters that remember the CTS Approach from back in the day would be appreciated.

Thanks

Yonex EZONE line, choose what pleases you and go for it.
Great rackets.

tnsanydy
05-31-2011, 08:48 PM
Follow this advice. Buy another CTS Approach. Racquets dont decay or have a shelf life. If the CTS Approach feel good then track down that racquet.

I am not impressed with the feel of modern racquets and the frames I use have long been discontinued. I remeber the CTS Approach and Precision very well. They were good sticks.

I also agree with yoou on this subject. Like we all say, if ain't broke, why fix it, right? :)

a0f6459
05-31-2011, 09:03 PM
Actually, since I played alot of tournaments, I do have two Approaches.

So, even though these were heavily used back in the day, the racket is just as good? I thought I read a term around here called racket fatigue. Not sure what it is or if that applies to my 20+ yr old racket.

Thanks for all the tips, especially for those of you that did use the approach.

My problem is also finding bumper guards and grommets. Luckily I have one spare grommet, however, I searched all over online for replacement bumper guards. My older approach of the two I own really needs it's bumper replaced. Any solutions? Is putting tape guard the best I can hope for?

Also for those that have moved on from the Approach, what rackets do you now use?

Thanks

beeveewee
06-01-2011, 09:30 AM
Racquet fatigue is more theory than fact. I wouldn't put much stock in that unless you have reason to think it isn't performing well for you.

You and I have the same story.

Lessons I learned re: racquet search (may or may not apply to you):
1. Play a USTA league with your current racquet. You will learn a lot about what you actually need vs. what you think you need. For instance, I learned that I needed much more versatility. In H.S. I was pretty good and played 1st/2nd singles. I'm not the star of the team now so am playing quite a bit of doubles.
2. Most of the tech does add some aspect of improved performance but usually sacrifices something else. Some of the tech is just stupid.
3. Oversize racquets were popular in the late 80s / early 90s. I played with a Prince OS in High School. My hitting partner did (He had a CTS precision OS, found a couple of MPs on the bay and loves them). Everybody did.
4. I have demoed lots of racquets and pretty much decided to stick with something in the 95 to 100 si range. Good balance of pros/cons.
5. Arm friendliness is WAY more important to me now than ever. My arm starts hurting in less than an hour with the wrong frame. When I switch to a good frame mid-course, my arm heals as I play.
6. The one thing I will say about the new tech is that I was playing a 12.5oz racquet and was skeptical that I could go lighter and still hit hard and not destroy my arm. I think I was wrong. I've hit with at least one 11.5oz racquet that plows the ball very well and is easy on my arm (blx 98).

Now that I just completed my first season of USTA I'm in full shopping mode. You can check out the four racquets I am reviewing in one of my other posts.

a0f6459
06-01-2011, 11:36 AM
Racquet fatigue is more theory than fact. I wouldn't put much stock in that unless you have reason to think it isn't performing well for you.

You and I have the same story.

Lessons I learned re: racquet search (may or may not apply to you):
1. Play a USTA league with your current racquet. You will learn a lot about what you actually need vs. what you think you need. For instance, I learned that I needed much more versatility. In H.S. I was pretty good and played 1st/2nd singles. I'm not the star of the team now so am playing quite a bit of doubles.
2. Most of the tech does add some aspect of improved performance but usually sacrifices something else. Some of the tech is just stupid.
3. Oversize racquets were popular in the late 80s / early 90s. I played with a Prince OS in High School. My hitting partner did (He had a CTS precision OS, found a couple of MPs on the bay and loves them). Everybody did.
4. I have demoed lots of racquets and pretty much decided to stick with something in the 95 to 100 si range. Good balance of pros/cons.
5. Arm friendliness is WAY more important to me now than ever. My arm starts hurting in less than an hour with the wrong frame. When I switch to a good frame mid-course, my arm heals as I play.
6. The one thing I will say about the new tech is that I was playing a 12.5oz racquet and was skeptical that I could go lighter and still hit hard and not destroy my arm. I think I was wrong. I've hit with at least one 11.5oz racquet that plows the ball very well and is easy on my arm (blx 98).

Now that I just completed my first season of USTA I'm in full shopping mode. You can check out the four racquets I am reviewing in one of my other posts.

Wow, pretty similar. I was also 1/2 singles throughout my hs years. Obviously my skill have deteriorated since then, but hopefully I can regain some of it back with more time on the court. As for point 6, I am also weary of all these lighter rackets. Reading through these forums I am surprised that the Approach at 12+ oz is considered heavy. I remember hitting with the Wilson Hammer and found the light weight to be unbearable.

Did you find the switch from OS to tweener to be an easy transition? I don't worry about framing the ball with the smaller head size, but being that Approach 110 is the only adult racket I have ever used, I wonder if I could get used to the feel of it.

I'll check out your other posts.

Thanks

beeveewee
06-01-2011, 06:16 PM
My hitting partner (Pete) switched from his old H.S. CTS Precision OS to a couple of CTS Precision Mid-Plus he found on fleabay. He has been demoing the same racquets I have but hasn't found anything better. Not sure if that would work for you but it would certainly be an affordable experiment.

hrstrat57
06-01-2011, 06:20 PM
One more thought, might be stating the obvious but you are aware TW has a great demo program?

magnut
06-01-2011, 06:29 PM
My hitting partner (Pete) switched from his old H.S. CTS Precision OS to a couple of CTS Precision Mid-Plus he found on fleabay. He has been demoing the same racquets I have but hasn't found anything better. Not sure if that would work for you but it would certainly be an affordable experiment.

The CTS precision was a great racquet indeed and has a bit of a cult following. I had a great fondness for the Midplus version. The only grip I ever had was with the breaking but caps.

meowmix
06-01-2011, 06:43 PM
Actually, since I played alot of tournaments, I do have two Approaches.

So, even though these were heavily used back in the day, the racket is just as good? I thought I read a term around here called racket fatigue. Not sure what it is or if that applies to my 20+ yr old racket.

Thanks for all the tips, especially for those of you that did use the approach.

My problem is also finding bumper guards and grommets. Luckily I have one spare grommet, however, I searched all over online for replacement bumper guards. My older approach of the two I own really needs it's bumper replaced. Any solutions? Is putting tape guard the best I can hope for?

Also for those that have moved on from the Approach, what rackets do you now use?

Thanks

Here's one: http://www.plazatennisandsports.com/prince.html

You can always use head protection tape in place of bumper guards (just make sure to do 2-3 layers, and add a little lead). You can use individual grommets to replace the ones that wear out. Your stringer should have them.

a0f6459
06-02-2011, 08:42 AM
Thanks for all the replies.

Good find meowmix, I'll give them a call

Never used lead tape before. Since the approach is already 12+ oz and another member in this thread mentioned that it was 7-8 HL, what is the recommended weight add and location for this racket?

dak95_00
06-02-2011, 02:56 PM
I have two CTS Approach OS 4 3/8 in very good condition. I'd sell them for the right price. Their plastic is very good! I believe I purchased them for a total of $40. I'd trade them for one of my regular sticks in very good/new condition w/ a 4 1/2! I have references and could send pics.

Anyways, my regular stick is the Head Microgel Radical OS and I feel the two racquets are VERY similar. Meowmix even told me where I could buy them (Rads) for $65 new!

struggle
06-02-2011, 03:11 PM
i've got a CTS lightning OS i'll send for a few bucks plus shipping. (shameless "clean the closet" plug).

get out there, you don't no stinkin' "NEW" racket.

on the contrary, you'll likely prefer rackets similar to those you used BITD.

have fun, i just got back into just over a year ago since the late 80's. good stuff!!

Netspirit
06-02-2011, 07:12 PM
It is easy - look for and ask for best-sellers. This will give you a good "system of coordinates", from where you will do your fine-tuning.

Try a good tweener like Wilson Pro Open (and/or Surge, which is lighter). Try a good player's frame like Wilson BLX90, see what your arm and body have to say. Try something in between tweeners and players' frames, like Dunlop 200 lite, if you like the feel but want to remain realistic about your capabilities.

a0f6459
06-02-2011, 09:18 PM
I have two CTS Approach OS 4 3/8 in very good condition. I'd sell them for the right price. Their plastic is very good! I believe I purchased them for a total of $40. I'd trade them for one of my regular sticks in very good/new condition w/ a 4 1/2! I have references and could send pics.

Anyways, my regular stick is the Head Microgel Radical OS and I feel the two racquets are VERY similar. Meowmix even told me where I could buy them (Rads) for $65 new!

I have two already, so not sure if I need 4. What price are you looking for?

Email me arf031 @ yahoo

canadad
06-04-2011, 05:18 PM
I played with older frames for a long time, they were the Wilson Hammer 6.2's. I had a 7 year layoff and came back to the sport. I thought they were the best things going until I tested new racquets with new technology. I for one enjoy trying and researching new and different racquets. In my opinion, go out and try new racquets, you can always go back to the Approaches. That entire CTS line was great I had a Precision, and a Graphtech DB (just pre-CTS line). That was a great time for racquets.

PJayhawk
06-06-2011, 07:59 AM
a0f6459, This is beeveewee’s hitting partner, Pete. He mentioned your post, and I had to join because I have an almost identical story to yours. First of all, welcome back to the game! It’s really been a joy to rediscover the sport that meant so much to me as a kid, and it’s exciting to hear about other folks enjoying the same kind of renaissance.

I don't know that I have any genius advice, but I'll tell you my story if it offers you any insight. Like you, I was also a 1/2 singles player, baseline counterpuncher who loved pace from opponents. To clarify my racquet history: I played through high school with a CTS Precision OS, then finished my high school career with the CTS Synergy 26 OS. After getting back into the game last Summer, I found a CTS Synergy 26 MP on The Fleabay and bought it out of curiosity. Though I recall playtesting the MP but preferring the OS all those years ago, I immediately preferred the feel and control of the MP this time around. And I liked not feeling like I was swinging a butterfly net all over the court. I immediately put the OS in the bag, and have not picked it up since. But that’s just my personal experience.

Regarding new racquets, my first piece of advice is to take everyone’s opinion with a grain of salt; and to use an entire salt shaker when someone tells you that such-and-such a frame is the best ever, or the perfect one for you, etc. Everybody on this forum is really passionate about tennis, which is a good thing. But in the end, tennis technology is just not something that should be considered militantly, unless maybe you’re the CEO of Babolat and you have countless families relying on you for their livelihoods. Then, by all means, get militant.

But I digress. I planned to keep playing a few more seasons with my newfound CTS Synergy 26 MPs, giving me time to fully re-develop my game and learn about the advances in string technology since my previous playing days (who knew Prince Synthetic Gut is now considered “old-school”?). Then I discovered a crack in one of my MP frames. I don’t much subscribe to the racquet fatigue theories (now you watch- I bet that will elicit some of those militant comments I warned you about!), but I also realized, just like you have, that it’s hard to find these particular frames, and even harder to find grommets for them. So I’m opening up my search for new current frames. The specs on the CTS Synergy 26 MP are: 95 sq. in., 12.25 oz strung, 9 pts HL, SW 326. (You can call Prince for the specs on your Response if you don’t already know them. I don’t recall that they could give me a frame stiffness.) With that in mind, I have demoed the following frames:

Dunlop Aerogel 4D 100
Volkl PB 9
Boris Becker Delta Core London
Gamma Tour 330x
ProKennex Ionic Ki5

Of those, the Dunlop AG4D 100 stood head and shoulders above the rest. It has the smallest head size (90 s.i., probably smaller than what I will actually end up with), but the crispest feel, best combination of power and control, and best response. I figured that during my 18-year hiatus from the game, technology would have improved to the point where I could drop a half and ounce or more from my frame and get the same kind of performance. In some cases that has seemed true, and not so in others.

My next set of frames to demo are these:

Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300 Tour
Donnay X-Red 99
ProKennex Black Ace 98
Pacific X Force

Of these, the Pacific line is particularly fascinating to me, and might be to you also, because it has a tapered beam similar to Prince’s old CTS line. The Pacific X Force tapers from 25 mm down to 20 mm. As a bonus, they have some of the better looking paint jobs out there right now (again, you watch- here come the militant comments about not choosing a racquet based on looks!)

My best advice is to learn about racquet specs; it will really help you to make a more informed decision about what is right for you, and also help you understand more about your own game’s strengths and weaknesses. Once you develop a set of specs you’d like to try, demo lots of racquets. For your final purchase, choose a frame that feels best in stock form, and customize it from there. You can drive yourself nuts trying to factor in string type, adding lead, polarizing, etc. during your search, and I don’t think it will be helpful to you to buy a frame knowing that it doesn’t feel good to begin with. In other words, don’t overthink it.

And, as beeveewee and I often remind each other, the reason you can’t beat your opponent will almost never have anything to do with the specs on your frame, the texture of your string, or needing 1/64th of an ounce of lead at the 8:22 and 10:38 positions on your racquet; but it will have almost everything to do with the fact that you’re older, slower, out of practice, and mentally lazier than you used to be. There now- ain’t that a ray of sunshine? (And with that, I just made the militant racquet techies on this forum fall off their chairs, foaming at the mouth in uncontrolled rage. Sorry, fellas.)

Sorry about the length of this post, I didn't mean to get so wordy, so take it with a whole salt shaker. Good luck! And keep us posted on your research and final decision!

a0f6459
06-06-2011, 09:09 AM
a0f6459, This is beeveewee’s hitting partner, Pete. He mentioned your post, and I had to join because I have an almost identical story to yours. First of all, welcome back to the game! It’s really been a joy to rediscover the sport that meant so much to me as a kid, and it’s exciting to hear about other folks enjoying the same kind of renaissance.

I don't know that I have any genius advice, but I'll tell you my story if it offers you any insight. Like you, I was also a 1/2 singles player, baseline counterpuncher who loved pace from opponents. To clarify my racquet history: I played through high school with a CTS Precision OS, then finished my high school career with the CTS Synergy 26 OS. After getting back into the game last Summer, I found a CTS Synergy 26 MP on The Fleabay and bought it out of curiosity. Though I recall playtesting the MP but preferring the OS all those years ago, I immediately preferred the feel and control of the MP this time around. And I liked not feeling like I was swinging a butterfly net all over the court. I immediately put the OS in the bag, and have not picked it up since. But that’s just my personal experience.

Regarding new racquets, my first piece of advice is to take everyone’s opinion with a grain of salt; and to use an entire salt shaker when someone tells you that such-and-such a frame is the best ever, or the perfect one for you, etc. Everybody on this forum is really passionate about tennis, which is a good thing. But in the end, tennis technology is just not something that should be considered militantly, unless maybe you’re the CEO of Babolat and you have countless families relying on you for their livelihoods. Then, by all means, get militant.

But I digress. I planned to keep playing a few more seasons with my newfound CTS Synergy 26 MPs, giving me time to fully re-develop my game and learn about the advances in string technology since my previous playing days (who knew Prince Synthetic Gut is now considered “old-school”?). Then I discovered a crack in one of my MP frames. I don’t much subscribe to the racquet fatigue theories (now you watch- I bet that will elicit some of those militant comments I warned you about!), but I also realized, just like you have, that it’s hard to find these particular frames, and even harder to find grommets for them. So I’m opening up my search for new current frames. The specs on the CTS Synergy 26 MP are: 95 sq. in., 12.25 oz strung, 9 pts HL, SW 326. (You can call Prince for the specs on your Response if you don’t already know them. I don’t recall that they could give me a frame stiffness.) With that in mind, I have demoed the following frames:

Dunlop Aerogel 4D 100
Volkl PB 9
Boris Becker Delta Core London
Gamma Tour 330x
ProKennex Ionic Ki5

Of those, the Dunlop AG4D 100 stood head and shoulders above the rest. It has the smallest head size (90 s.i., probably smaller than what I will actually end up with), but the crispest feel, best combination of power and control, and best response. I figured that during my 18-year hiatus from the game, technology would have improved to the point where I could drop a half and ounce or more from my frame and get the same kind of performance. In some cases that has seemed true, and not so in others.

My next set of frames to demo are these:

Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300 Tour
Donnay X-Red 99
ProKennex Black Ace 98
Pacific X Force

Of these, the Pacific line is particularly fascinating to me, and might be to you also, because it has a tapered beam similar to Prince’s old CTS line. The Pacific X Force tapers from 25 mm down to 20 mm. As a bonus, they have some of the better looking paint jobs out there right now (again, you watch- here come the militant comments about not choosing a racquet based on looks!)

My best advice is to learn about racquet specs; it will really help you to make a more informed decision about what is right for you, and also help you understand more about your own game’s strengths and weaknesses. Once you develop a set of specs you’d like to try, demo lots of racquets. For your final purchase, choose a frame that feels best in stock form, and customize it from there. You can drive yourself nuts trying to factor in string type, adding lead, polarizing, etc. during your search, and I don’t think it will be helpful to you to buy a frame knowing that it doesn’t feel good to begin with. In other words, don’t overthink it.

And, as beeveewee and I often remind each other, the reason you can’t beat your opponent will almost never have anything to do with the specs on your frame, the texture of your string, or needing 1/64th of an ounce of lead at the 8:22 and 10:38 positions on your racquet; but it will have almost everything to do with the fact that you’re older, slower, out of practice, and mentally lazier than you used to be. There now- ain’t that a ray of sunshine? (And with that, I just made the militant racquet techies on this forum fall off their chairs, foaming at the mouth in uncontrolled rage. Sorry, fellas.)

Sorry about the length of this post, I didn't mean to get so wordy, so take it with a whole salt shaker. Good luck! And keep us posted on your research and final decision!

Pjayhawk,

I really appreciate the response. I think after reading the responses to my thread, I am going to start of giving my rackets a shot. After all, it's not like I didn't like the way it played all of a sudden, I just didn't know if technology had changed so much that I would be better off trying something new. Apparently, this is not the case. Really, my bigger concern is replacing the grommets and head bumper, but I'll cross that road when I get there.

I have also thought about going to MP, but I think I will just try to go with higher tension on my strings and see how that feels. I don't think I am that much stronger than I was in in HS, so I don't think this aspect should change too much. All the reading about string setups make my head spin, so it's funny that you mention Prince synthetic. For now I'll start out with this string and if need be, tweak from there.

Thanks for the racket suggestions. If and when I do decide to demo new ones, I'll be sure to check back on ths thread for all the great replies people have given.

If you happen to demo a racket that really plays well and matches the feel (ala the Pacific you mentioned) it would be great to hear about it.

On a separate note about customization (something I never did), since the the Approach already has a high static weight (of course this is relative to today's rackets because I never felt that the Approach was heavy), is there really any need for it. Will increasing the swing weight be that beneficial? (yes I hare pretty much read all the main threads on this topic) I just wanted to know from a CTS approach prespective.

Thanks!