PDA

View Full Version : Stringing Machine?


Sintherius
06-10-2011, 12:32 PM
What stringing machine do you guys use when you string rackets for us customers?

TW Staff
06-10-2011, 01:12 PM
Prince NEOS 1000

Spencer, TW.

zapvor
06-14-2011, 04:45 AM
i posted this like last week!

diredesire
06-14-2011, 11:43 AM
i posted this like last week!

The question's been asked all the way back 'til ~2005, give the guy a break ;)

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/search.php?searchid=10416281

hollywood9826
06-16-2011, 10:57 AM
The question's been asked all the way back 'til ~2005, give the guy a break ;)

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/search.php?searchid=10416281

You have to forgive Zap. He wears triple X basketball shorts to the tennis courts with no pockets even though he weighs maybe 140 lbs when he wet and wearing boots.

I think its intersting they didnt go fancy electric on the machines yet.

eliza
06-16-2011, 04:23 PM
Prince NEOS 1000

Spencer, TW.

Hello, Spencer.
I am going to throw my question here, have not seen any response anywhere...
In your opinion, for a rec player who strings only every 2-3 months, is best to buy a cheap stringer (which could bring to more "trials" with new strings, but maybe not so good a job), or keep having a Pro string the racquet on a Pro machine?

whomad15
06-16-2011, 04:50 PM
Hello, Spencer.
I am going to throw my question here, have not seen any response anywhere...
In your opinion, for a rec player who strings only every 2-3 months, is best to buy a cheap stringer (which could bring to more "trials" with new strings, but maybe not so good a job), or keep having a Pro string the racquet on a Pro machine?

so 4-6 times a year. Say $10 a job. $40-60 a year. Play for 3-4 years and it's already saving you money.
I personally am waiting to find a good deal. Can save some extra money buying a "used" machine.

eliza
06-17-2011, 04:09 AM
Whomadi, what about the quality of the job? How good would be, compared to a "commercial"grade machine?

esgee48
06-17-2011, 06:16 AM
The quality of the string job depends on the person, not the machine. That said, pro level machines make the job easier and generally take less time. Most of the posters who have DW claim less than 45 min and as fast as 20 min (??).

eliza
06-17-2011, 08:52 AM
The quality of the string job depends on the person, not the machine. That said, pro level machines make the job easier and generally take less time. Most of the posters who have DW claim less than 45 min and as fast as 20 min (??).

OK, the PERSON not the machine....So the only advantage of the Pro's machine is time? I truly hope you are right!!!

diredesire
06-17-2011, 10:07 AM
OK, the PERSON not the machine....So the only advantage of the Pro's machine is time? I truly hope you are right!!!

Differing opinions, you should check out the stringing techniques/machines sub-forum.
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/forumdisplay.php?f=23

I personally don't think it's just time, but I'm going to come off as a machine snob compared to the many happy DW users... Read the FAQ/Sticky in the section.

Cliff's notes: It's pretty much always worth it to buy a stringing machine if you break strings a lot and/or restring a lot. The exception is if your time is worth more than the cost of a restring, and/or if you just aren't interested at all as to how your equipment is maintained and/or if you don't like working with your hands..??

Even if you buy a more expensive stringing machine, it will pay itself back in no time. The previous $10 estimate savings is really, really low for most pro-shops. All local pro shops I've seen charge >= 15$ for even cheap synthetic gut. Some shops also have markup on string. It's rare (at least in my part of the country) to get a basic (Prince Syn w/ DF) for <$20. Consider switching to a basic syn gut reel like Gosen OG-Sheep Micro for $35. The cost per set ends up being right around $2.

Worst case scenario you save ~$18/job, and at the best case 6/year, you're already making back ~$108/year. If you buy a basic dropweight, you are spending <$200. If you start stringing for other people, you only make the money back faster! It makes a lot of economical sense, but there are those out there who don't like stringing, so consider your options, and read up.

eliza
06-17-2011, 01:44 PM
Thank you, Diredesire, I will. I am confused about the great variety of machines out there (like racquets, nowadays there is just too much!!!). You are right on the price, I pay now 12$ (w/t strings). The beauty would be to try different sets/tensions/set-ups........I am just afraid b/c I still do not know the kind of commitment it requires...

diredesire
06-17-2011, 02:25 PM
Thank you, Diredesire, I will. I am confused about the great variety of machines out there (like racquets, nowadays there is just too much!!!). You are right on the price, I pay now 12$ (w/t strings). The beauty would be to try different sets/tensions/set-ups........I am just afraid b/c I still do not know the kind of commitment it requires...

Just depends how "into it" you want to get! Commitment to get enough knowledge to string is maybe 6 hours up front. I'd read through instructions manuals a few times and just go for it. If you want to get an idea of the process itself, check out YULitle's videos on youtube. Watch them in your spare time and make your decision then. There's no rush :) We've got a very solid community right here at TW that will help you through your first few jobs, and if you want to call it quits in terms of learning about stringing technique, then that's OK. There is a lifetime's worth of "stuff" to learn, but you can get strings in a racquet (the right way!) in a very short time. It helps tremendously to have someone with experience right next to you the first time, but overall the commitment is minimal.

Stringing machines hold their value extremely well, by the way. If you decide it's not right for you, you can likely sell your machine via e-bay, the boards, or craigslist for a very minimal loss.

As you said, one of the major benefits is having the freedom to experiment with strings. One of the major drawbacks, however, is having the freedom to experiment with strings ;) You'll find yourself trying a lot of stuff that you might never have ended up trying (because you save so much on labor, it's justifiable!). For some people (like me), having a large inventory of string is one of those "nice things." While I definitely come out ahead in the long run, I've made significant investments in string stock, and it's very, very easy to drop several hundreds of dollars on string reels in one go. Consider that part when you look at stringing for the long term/commitments.

[As an aside, this situation CAN be very similar to buying a nice (digital) SLR camera. The initial investment can be pretty darn steep (~$1000 for an entry level kit {~$250 for an entry level stringing kit}), but the lenses (string) can end up costing you way more in the long run. (For reference, pro level lenses are easily $1000+, and you "need" more than just one in the long run)]. Choose your battles ;)

Edit: As far as your initial confusing with machine types, etc, one of the threads in the stickies (Mansewerz guide..) is a great place to start. You'll get a flavor of different machine types, and what they offer. It's definitely worth a read even if you're just casually thinking about maybe getting into stringing. Once you've read that, ask specific questions in the stringing technique/machines section. (You need to focus down your questions to get the answers you're REALLY looking for)

eliza
06-17-2011, 03:42 PM
Diredesire, you are simply great, THANK YOU!!!!
I will start with that thread, to familiarize myself with the different kinds of machines....
Are you right about strings, I already fancy gut/multi, poly/multi, soft poly, tension at 50, maybe 45, then maybe 60 or 52-54? etc.etc. I think Tennis is my drug......:)
OP: my apologies for taking over the thread with my simple questions....
Keep you posted on my purchase.....

diredesire
06-17-2011, 04:56 PM
Diredesire, you are simply great, THANK YOU!!!!
I will start with that thread, to familiarize myself with the different kinds of machines....
Are you right about strings, I already fancy gut/multi, poly/multi, soft poly, tension at 50, maybe 45, then maybe 60 or 52-54? etc.etc. I think Tennis is my drug......:)
OP: my apologies for taking over the thread with my simple questions....
Keep you posted on my purchase.....

Yep! lets move the discussion over to strings and stringing. I would recommend changing one thing at a time. This means if you have a gut job at 60 lbs, and then switch to a poly job at 40 lbs, and you happen to really like the poly job, you don't know if you like the tension or the string! As a result, try buying a reel of gosen OG sheep micro (pretty much the best value string available, IMHO) and mess around with tensions. Then swap to new strings, etc.

eliza
06-18-2011, 03:11 AM
You created a monster, eheheheheh.