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Speedy_tennis
06-28-2005, 02:14 PM
anyone has cut a racket???

Gaines Hillix
06-28-2005, 02:19 PM
If you mean cut off part of the handle to reduce its length, yes, I've done several. My latest were a couple of POG Longbody's. I've also done Chang Graphites. I use a power mitre saw with a carbide tipped blade to do it. You can also use an ordinary hacksaw if you're very careful. You have to remove the grip and butt cap, but there's really not much to it. Of course, you need to check the resulting weight and balance points and add lead tape to get it back to where you want it before you put it back together. One caviat here...the ones I've done had foam or foam composite handles, not graphite. Also, some handles have built in shock absorber systems or other technology in them. You need to check for that before you tear into one.

AndrewD
06-28-2005, 07:20 PM
Gaines,

have you had any feedback, from the POG longbody customer, regarding how they play with the altered length?

Tenny
06-28-2005, 07:55 PM
Gaines,

How thick (in general) are those handle structure? In other words, can I use sandpapers to slim down handles for my son? From my experience with overgrip, very small difference can make the racquet feel very different.

raftermania
06-28-2005, 08:07 PM
I cut a racquet once, he just wasn't good enough for the team.

gmorr001
06-28-2005, 08:13 PM
I cut off a pure drive plus that I got for cheap, and after i Re-weighted it, I accually like it better then my standards.

Steve Huff
06-28-2005, 09:51 PM
I've cut off a couple of frames. One was a Yonex RD 7 Power Long. Can't remember the other. I just used a hacksaw and a miter box to keep it straight. The graphite handles take a little to get the saw going, but the graphite itself, is usually pretty thin in the handle.

AndrewD
06-28-2005, 10:03 PM
Gaines,

How thick (in general) are those handle structure? In other words, can I use sandpapers to slim down handles for my son? From my experience with overgrip, very small difference can make the racquet feel very different.

Tenny,
My brother has had some succes in sanding down the grip of his POG OS. He'd found the 5/8 grip to be too large and the bevels far sharper than on his old frame. So, with a bit of relatively find sandpaper her rounded it out and reduced the overall size.

Although it is down to a 1/2 I think he'd be the first to admit it isnt the most exact process. Still, having hit with his frame I cant tell if its not perfectly symmetrical and imagine the grip masks a bit of that. You can feel that the bevels aren't as sharp (which I found more comfortable) but people who've hit with it haven't made so much as a comment so I guess its noticeable but not in any way distracting.

Tenny
06-28-2005, 10:32 PM
Thanks Andrew and Steve

I know this may sound absurd but I am considering giving one of my prostaff 6.0 95 to my 10 yr old son. He is into martial art and tennis will have to wait a while but 95 is very arm-friendly (I wouldn't buy a PD for my son), sping friendly, low powered, and feels lighter than its 12oz weight thanks to its very headlightness. But grip is my size 4 3/8 so probably I will do something with the handle. It seems those player's racquet handles aren't extremely thin as those titanium head racquets. Yeah, I'd be very careful. I've done some carving work with some of my dead racquets. Just a trivial mistouch (too much knife job) caused big trouble. Our hands are so sensitive!

BTW, Steve. I knew the frame is like 'pipe'. But how thin was the wall? When I hit with POG or PS6.0, I cannot imagine it's hollow inside. So I thought it must be rather thick walled tube. Hammers or other beginners' sticks are different, of course.

diredesire
06-29-2005, 12:23 AM
If you mean cut off part of the handle to reduce its length, yes, I've done several. My latest were a couple of POG Longbody's. I've also done Chang Graphites. I use a power mitre saw with a carbide tipped blade to do it. You can also use an ordinary hacksaw if you're very careful. You have to remove the grip and butt cap, but there's really not much to it. Of course, you need to check the resulting weight and balance points and add lead tape to get it back to where you want it before you put it back together. One caviat here...the ones I've done had foam or foam composite handles, not graphite. Also, some handles have built in shock absorber systems or other technology in them. You need to check for that before you tear into one.

Gaines has pretty much covered all the main points you need to know, be careful with some of the older frames, in the recent years (although this is slowly starting to change) the walls of the grips are very thin (1-2mm or so) and are hollow, and can be cut fairly easily with a hacksaw. The carbide tipped blade was actually a tip i mentioned to gaines, the reason behind this is because some grips (namely the Chang series, and probably the POG 28s) are reinforced by aluminum? (some metal), and normal blades may have a hard time cutting through them, the carbide will help get through those sections. Some frames i have cut down (in the same series) lack those reinforcements, but it's always better to be safe than sorry.

As far as sanding down the handle, If you have the resources, you can use a milling machine to precisely sand them down, or you can do it the old fashioned way-by hand.

Note: The following only applies to the PU foam handled grips. This is not applicable for the modern/superlight hollow grips that are made of/consisting only of the graphite material.

Get a block of wood, make sure a side is relatively flat, get some fairly coarse/medium sand paper, 220 grit would probably be my choice to remove material but maintain some consistency. Glue/tape/staple the sandpaper to the block (acrylic works fairly well, but warps when heated, it's also a bit hard to find a block thick enough, they actually make sanding blocks for this purpose, look for one at lowe's or Home Depot)

Mark up the grip (use a fat permanent marker and color on the entire grip). Remove the buttcap (some needle nose pliers should do the job removing the staples. Keep the buttcap intact if you aren't shrinking the grip too much...

Begin sanding. Once the marker on each bevel is completely gone, you have probably removed just enough to go down about half a grip size, this is just an eye-ball measurement, you can adjust as you see fit. Continue doing this on all bevels until all the markings are gone.

The reason you need to use a level block is because it helps maintain the definition of the bevels/edges. If you neglect this you may end up in a very rounded grip.

As far as thickness of the foam, it varies from manufacturer to manufacturer and grip to grip. I find that older model racquets generally have the same base grip and are built up/have PU foam molded around them. If you have a 3/8 grip, i would imagine you can safely sand down to about 2/8 before worrying about it. You should be able to tell by removing the buttcap and seeing how thick the inside is.

Note about buttcaps: If you sand a grip down a full size, chances are the buttcap will rattle or be a little loose/wiggle/etc. You may need to acquire a buttcap of a more appropriate size. If you have the luxury of having access to a milling machine, just leave the old buttcap on and mill around it. If you are hand-sanding, you can look around at local pro-shops etc, chances are they will have a few spare buttcaps in your size.

If not, you can order spares from a variety of online stores, most of which i cannot link, so i won't bother.

I hope this helps answering your questions...

Quick note: take note of all balance point/weight/swingewight (if applicable/possible) before cutting a racquet down/sanding the grip. If you cut a racuqet, the playability characteristics of a frame change drastically, and require a bit of weight to get them back where they were. They typically swing a lot lighter and are more maneuverable, i can't comment too much on the balance point, though, as when i modified my old changs, i never really played with them stock, i just knew they were too long. ;)

Other note: as far as sanding down the grip, you DO lose a noticeable (IMO) bit of weight in the handle, so supergluing a quarter to the bottom of the grip, or adding a few strips of lead is in order. If you're handing it over to someone who hasn't had experience with the frame before (such as your son), i would imagine he wouldn't really care about the minor changes... Just something to think about

Kudos, happy modding
-DD

Redflea
07-02-2005, 12:03 AM
Tenny...wasn't sure if you meant you were going to give the racquet to your son now (at 10 yrs old) or in a few years...if the former, I wouldn't give a 12oz racquet to a 10 year old unless he is large and strong for his age...my son (11, turning 12 in Oct) borrowed one of my RDX Mids (11.8 oz) the other night when his strings on his own racquet broke. He's 75 to 80 lbs, 4' 7" or so. Small for his age...closer to the average 10 year old.

He hit great w/the RDX...for about 20 minutes or so, and then the wheels started to come off. Late on strokes, faltering service motion, missed volleys. Just too much mass for young arm to move. Yonex is flexy and "arm friendly" but that didn't help given the racquet was simply too heavy.

If you're going to be getting a racquet for your son in the near future, I'd recommend something lighter...maybe up to 10.5 oz at most.

Speedy_tennis
07-02-2005, 05:53 PM
i cutted a head ti laser, to 25 inch for my young brother, the racket is excelent, i purchased for 100 pesos, arround 30 dollars, too expensive for you but an aluminium racket is more priced in argentina,

Tenny
07-15-2005, 06:34 PM
Tenny...wasn't sure if you meant you were going to give the racquet to your son now (at 10 yrs old) or in a few years...if the former, I wouldn't give a 12oz racquet to a 10 year old unless he is large and strong for his age...my son (11, turning 12 in Oct) borrowed one of my RDX Mids (11.8 oz) the other night when his strings on his own racquet broke. He's 75 to 80 lbs, 4' 7" or so. Small for his age...closer to the average 10 year old.

He hit great w/the RDX...for about 20 minutes or so, and then the wheels started to come off. Late on strokes, faltering service motion, missed volleys. Just too much mass for young arm to move. Yonex is flexy and "arm friendly" but that didn't help given the racquet was simply too heavy.

If you're going to be getting a racquet for your son in the near future, I'd recommend something lighter...maybe up to 10.5 oz at most.


Thanks for the input, Redflea

Actually, I just bought a pair of volkl V1 for my son. But I am not sure if I was honest. I guess I wanted to try it too. ha ha. Do you think V1 classic can be a good serious racquet for 10-11 yr old boy? For me, it is too light and powerful.
He is into martial art now (Sword thing). Probably will have strong arms.