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Golden Retriever
06-20-2011, 07:25 AM
Wouldn't the grass, being soft, slows the bounce thus the speed of the ball? Just curious.

BrooklynNY
06-20-2011, 07:38 AM
Soft Surface = Low bounce, Also, Less friction between the ball and a gritty surface

Low bounce = less time b/w bounces, and thus, less time for a player to get to the ball.

drakulie
06-20-2011, 07:39 AM
The grass this year looks super slow. feel like I'm watching Tennis Channel Classic Matches from the 70's.

jonnythan
06-20-2011, 07:41 AM
To expand very slightly, the low friction means the ball doesn't slow down horizontally as much when it bounces. Combined with the low bounce from the less elastic collision, you have less time to get to a ball after a bounce.

fiurein
06-20-2011, 07:41 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grass_court

...
However, Wimbledon, the most prestigious grass tournament, has slowed down its grass courts as early as 2001, with players stating that the courts of Wimbledon have become slower, heavier, and high bouncing.[1] In 2001, organizers at Wimbledon had changed the grass to 100% perennial rye, in addition to changing to a harder and denser soil, which resulted in a higher bounce to the ball -- earning Wimbledon grass the unwanted nickname of “green clay". Grass specialist, Tim Henman, voiced out against this change in 2002, by stating, "What on earth is going on here? I'm on a grass court and it's the slowest court I've played on this year."[2] As a result, baseline play has become a preferred approach at Wimbledon, as opposed to the serve and volley of the past....

jackson vile
06-20-2011, 11:32 AM
The grass this year looks super slow. feel like I'm watching Tennis Channel Classic Matches from the 70's.

That should increase Federer's chances, I know he will win.

baseliner
06-20-2011, 11:42 AM
because when the ball hits the grass it skids rather than bouncing up. Low bounce requires you bend your knees and get down to the ball.

The Djoker
06-20-2011, 11:59 AM
Well, huh, might as, might as well ask why is a tree good? Why is the sunset good? Why are boobs good? Why are some threads on this forum deleted? They Just Are!

Sid_Vicious
06-20-2011, 12:01 PM
That should increase Federer's chances, I know he will win.

I want some of whatever you are smoking.

Tammo
06-20-2011, 12:01 PM
When I try to play on my lawn the ball doesn't bounce

ben123
06-20-2011, 12:21 PM
That should increase Federer's chances, I know he will win.

uhm not rly these slooooooow courts are good for all the spanish claycourt dogs like the ******

Murrayfan31
06-20-2011, 03:21 PM
uhm not rly these slooooooow courts are good for all the spanish claycourt dogs like the ******
Not really. Nadal prefers high bouncing courts. Slow doesn't always mean high bouncing.

Bud
06-20-2011, 03:31 PM
The grass this year looks super slow. feel like I'm watching Tennis Channel Classic Matches from the 70's.

That should increase Federer's chances, I know he will win.

All the commentators are stating it's super fast this year.

jackson vile
06-20-2011, 03:35 PM
uhm not rly these slooooooow courts are good for all the spanish claycourt dogs like the ******

Strange, since Federer never won Wim when it was fast...

Bobby Jr
06-20-2011, 03:42 PM
All the commentators are stating it's super fast this year.
I watched a couple of 1st round matches and it's definitely faster than last year on centre court. Super fast - not so sure about that.. In Nadal's match there were more than a few 15+ shot rallys.

It's been really wet in London the past week - in contrast to the past 2 years. However, over the course of the tournament if it doesn't rain they'll harden up and slow more. I'm hoping for really humid days/nights for the whole tournament.

roundiesee
06-20-2011, 04:20 PM
because when the ball hits the grass it skids rather than bouncing up. Low bounce requires you bend your knees and get down to the ball.

Yes, that's the right answer, great post! For those who have had the good fortune to play on the stuff, you would undertsand why you need to prepare really early and set up your stroke way before the ball bounces, and to bend your knees. The ball really skids and takes off after hitting the grass turf, and you may get quite a few bad bounces, hence the traditional preference to serve and volley. Grass is wonderful for the joints though and you really do not feel the wear and tear so much as compared to hardcourts. Too bad this surface is so rare these days :(

Bobby Jr
06-20-2011, 04:42 PM
Yes, that's the right answer, great post! For those who have had the good fortune to play on the stuff, you would undertsand why you need to prepare really early and set up your stroke way before the ball bounces, and to bend your knees.(
The hardness/softness of the ground is the primary factor in bounce height. That's why when it's a very dry run up to Wimbledon, as we've seen the past couple of year, the ball has kicked up way higher than we used to see - even without the grounds staff doing anything intentional to cause it.

This year it seems like the lead up had had a lot more rain and high humidity - so the bounce is a bit lower at this stage.

Even though there is an indoor court I imagine they're somewhat expected to keep all the courts playing as close as practical to each other.

martini1
06-20-2011, 06:02 PM
For a lower level player who can't hit with pace, grass is slow because no balls are bouncing more than a few inches and they just died. However on those short grass tennis lawn, a ball with pace will carry most of its momentum forward. Less up, and more forward, which means it retains its speed more.

Tennis Is Magic
06-20-2011, 06:10 PM
It has to do with the court exerting force on the ball. Topspin kicks up high because it has high amounts of air pressure pushing it down. The ball exerts a force on the court, and the court exerts an equal force on the ball, causing the ball to bounce higher, just as backspin creates an area of high pressure under the ball, decreasing the effect gravity has on it, ergo decreasing the force the ball will exert on the court and the force the court will exert on the ball.

The same applies when the ball is in contact with the ground. The longer the ball is in contact with the court, the higher it will bounce because the ball is still being pushed down by gravity. Slick courts such as grass and hard courts which haven't been resurfaced in a long time are slick, so they don't grip onto the ball. Grainy courts, such as clay and newly resurfaced hard courts will grip onto the ball, increasing the impact time, allowing gravity to exert more force on it.

tl;dr: there isn't a tl;dr. Read my physics lesson!

Тинана
06-20-2011, 07:46 PM
It has to do with the court exerting force on the ball. Topspin kicks up high because it has high amounts of air pressure pushing it down. The ball exerts a force on the court, and the court exerts an equal force on the ball, causing the ball to bounce higher, just as backspin creates an area of high pressure under the ball, decreasing the effect gravity has on it, ergo decreasing the force the ball will exert on the court and the force the court will exert on the ball.

The same applies when the ball is in contact with the ground. The longer the ball is in contact with the court, the higher it will bounce because the ball is still being pushed down by gravity. Slick courts such as grass and hard courts which haven't been resurfaced in a long time are slick, so they don't grip onto the ball. Grainy courts, such as clay and newly resurfaced hard courts will grip onto the ball, increasing the impact time, allowing gravity to exert more force on it.

tl;dr: there isn't a tl;dr. Read my physics lesson!

well said.