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ktncnttl
07-01-2005, 12:24 PM
Players' racquets, eg Head Prestige etc, are fine when there is time to set up for the ball and take a big swing at it. But if there is no time for setting up and I can only block the ball back, players' racquets really can't compare with an oversize or even a tweener. Unfortunately, I am no Federer and I always find myself in situations where all I could do is blocking the ball back. Don't get me wrong I am no pusher but sometimes blocking is all you could do when you could barely get the racquet on the ball on time. Do you have the same problem with a player's racquet?

fishuuuuu
07-01-2005, 12:27 PM
Everybody has these problems. Even the real "players." Although what you say is true, the rewards reaped by proper and adequate preparation and execution of technique far outweigh any inadequacy that players' frames may have.

southpaw37
07-01-2005, 12:35 PM
I've played with an original Prince Graphite for more than ten years. Along the way I've hit most of the racquets that fall into this category. There is a reason why most of them are rated at low power and suggest fast swing speeds. If you don't feel these racquets work for you, then don't use them. You should be using the racquet that fits your game.

tom-selleck
07-01-2005, 12:47 PM
i agree totally, that's my biggest problem with players racquets too.... need really good footwork and preparation to avoid those situations, or make the best of the situation.... but i cough up too many soft balls with players racquet.... finding that no racquet is best for everything, but that's probably obvious.

ncode
07-01-2005, 12:49 PM
Nop. I'm a strong guy and pro and hit violently almost every time. The matches and racquets required such behaviour. :)

TennsDog
07-01-2005, 06:27 PM
Perhaps I do not play people who are good enough to put me into positions where I have to just block the ball back (not about how good I am, just that my opponents don't do this), but I use a player's racket and can always get enough power and/or depth unless I don't want to. I think that it shouldn't really be a problem for people who are used to the way a player's frame plays. However, if it is a problem, then you should probably go to either a new frame or a more powerful string setup. It will always be hard to find a setup that will give you control and feel when you want it, but also power and forgiveness when you are in trouble.
You just gotta get better! ;)

Simbah2004
07-02-2005, 05:03 PM
I've been playing with the Pure Drive and believe me, the change has been good for my game this far. I have more depth and spin, and when playing defensively I can retrive shots deep on the court, something very difficult to do with player's racquets.

JennyS
07-02-2005, 08:13 PM
I just tried a St. Vincents for the first time and I thought I was going to die after 30 minutes. I couldn't wait to get my Babolat back in my hands!

alan-n
07-02-2005, 10:25 PM
TennisDog covered it really well there. The bottom line is, the players racquet is not to blame. There are always advantages and disadvantages to different racquets.

mucat
07-03-2005, 12:35 AM
ktncnttl, I see you figure out the same thing I did. A tweener and a player racket will play the same most of the time, but when you are being rush or stretching to reach a wide ball, the tweener will allow you to hit a better shot.

Translation, those points that you win before with a player's racket, you will win them just the same. Those points that you were losing before with a player's racket, now you can win some of them.

Elenkov
07-03-2005, 01:22 AM
all you need is strenght/quickness. these raquets require technique and strenght alike. if the pro raquets were suitable for every player, then they wouldn't make other models...

Simbah2004
07-03-2005, 11:52 AM
mucat, great point. My defensive shots are way better now.

erik-the-red
07-03-2005, 02:29 PM
Try using a light-weight, sub-ten-ounce racquet against a true heavy hitter.

Your racquet will twist too much.

mucat
07-03-2005, 10:22 PM
I tried with PS85 6.0 against a true heavy hitter, it is no prettier.
The important thing is, throw away the terms player's racket, tweeners, granny sticks, etc. They are all just tennis rackets with different specs. You don't have to use a player's racket to be a good player, just find the racket with the right specs for you. I found 'player's rackets' are usually heavier and with denser string pattern, which means you have to be pretty strong to use it effectively. If your physique doesn't allow you to use it, no matter how good your strokes are, it doesn't matter.

textbook strokes
07-04-2005, 10:10 AM
What about if you are a baseliner, club level (3.5 or 4.0), but no twenner sitck gives your groundstrokes the weigth that only a player's frame deliver?.
I'm in this situation. My teacher keeps telling me the ncode 90 wasn't adequate for me, and almost forced me to switch. I've been demoing several twenners since then, and yes, I defend a little better but, I just don't feel my groundstrokes the way I used to. The result is I'm losing the joy of playing.
Should I not hear my teacher's advise (Who is by the way, a far better player than me) and go back to a player's frame. :confused:

kv581
07-04-2005, 10:25 AM
What about if you are a baseliner, club level (3.5 or 4.0), but no twenner sitck gives your groundstrokes the weigth that only a player's frame deliver?.
I'm in this situation. My teacher keeps telling me the ncode 90 wasn't adequate for me, and almost forced me to switch. I've been demoing several twenners since then, and yes, I defend a little better but, I just don't feel my groundstrokes the way I used to. The result is I'm losing the joy of playing.
Should I not hear my teacher's advise (Who is by the way, a far better player than me) and go back to a player's frame. :confused:
How about a compromise? A larger headed player's racquet like N6.1 95 or 6.0 95. Or Diablo midplus. Or oversizes like NXG and POG OS.

mucat
07-04-2005, 10:59 AM
textbook strokes, you can also add some weight to your current racket before going out to buy a new one. It is cheaper and you can still use the same racket you are using now.

Return_Ace
07-04-2005, 11:21 AM
ktncnttl, I see you figure out the same thing I did. A tweener and a player racket will play the same most of the time, but when you are being rush or stretching to reach a wide ball, the tweener will allow you to hit a better shot.

Translation, those points that you win before with a player's racket, you will win them just the same. Those points that you were losing before with a player's racket, now you can win some of them.

Sorry I have to disagreee there, the feel of hitting out i can get with my Ti-80 just isn't the same with my i.Tour, I have to hold back when killing a ball on my i.Tour whilst not on my ti-80

rulik
07-04-2005, 02:07 PM
i started to play tennis when i was 8 years old and my racquets were havy woodys which also used by adults. now i don't even demo the racquets more 90' because they don't have control and provide unuseful power. the problem with a havy racquet could be only technique and timing. I assume those who coplain about the weight never practise against the wall but if they do regulary, they could not only handle the weight, they could even step up from the base line and be more aressive.
i teach two young guys for about a year, who used oversizes, and after some time switched to prestiges and nobody from them was complaining about the weight. sometimes they like to borrow my racquets to practice with.

mucat
07-04-2005, 10:21 PM
Return_Ace, while you can hold back to adjust to a lighter racket, you can also change your swing path to put more topspin into the stroke.

rulik, I also came from wooden racket. I used wooden racket while others using graphite when I was in highschool. Nowaday I practice against the wall with PS 6.0 85, I even played with lower level player using my PS 6.0 85 sometimes. When we non player's racket users talk about cannot handle the weight, we usually mean cannot handle the weight after 2hrs of playing tennis against equal level player in a match. Practice with a heavy small head racket is one thing, playing a match with it is totally different. However, I believe how strong is your physique is a more important point to determine how heavy a racket you can carry than how good is your technique. Technique can only go so far if you are using the wrong equipment.

blueballs
07-05-2005, 12:13 AM
A "player's" racquet encourages good technique and you don't need big muscles to use it I know since I'm pretty skinny. If your swing is right and hit the ball at the right moment, any decent racquet will generate lots of power. In fact heavier racquets give you more power at the same swing speed, which means you can swing it slower and get the same pace on the ball vs a light racquet, which means it is easier to have a proper swing with a player's racquet if your goal is to put more pace on the ball. You don't want a racquet that allows you to generate "ok" power when dinking, this will halt your progress and not force you to develope good foot work and preparation. Plus I read very light racquets are not good for your arm in the long term.

rulik
07-05-2005, 12:37 AM
mucat.
i'm 30 190-195lb, no way the machine like me will be tired after 2 hours of using a havy racquet in a match.
If you can control and can be consistent better or the same with a light weight racquet my hands down. I don't want to force anybody it's just my point of view.

LafayetteHitter
07-05-2005, 12:45 AM
One thing I would like to point out from my perspective is this as well. I play mostly with people using tweener racquets. I have almost always used a 98" and below frame (exception being the V1) and appreciate the fact that most of the frames have forced me to have better anticipation skills and footwork compared to most of the guys I play with. I don't think that players frames work for everyone by any means just pointing out that knowing that my racquet will give back what I put into it makes me realize that I must split step, must move my feet, must prepare the racquet early etc. I play with some guys who are supposed to be 4.0 players at the club that look like statues out there. I have never had the problem of a mid to midplus frame lacking in the power department mainly because I focus on anticipation and getting my racquet prepared early. I agree let everyone use what works for them and don't worry what others think but for me I say give me my heavier frame.

RodgerDodger
07-05-2005, 03:19 AM
My personal opinion is that it's a good idea to persevere with a player's racquet when you are just starting out, within reason. By this, I don't mean that you should be using one when you're 6 years old or anything, but when you're slightly older and can manage the weight, it will help to ensure you work at your technique. I'm no professional, but the first serious racquet I used was a Wilson Pro Staff Classic at about 12 or 13yrs (can't remember), followed by a Yonex RD-7 at about 16yrs I think. Now I'm using a Yonex MP Tour-1. Now, when I pick up a tweener, it just feels wrong, and I think that's a good thing.

mucat
07-05-2005, 11:06 AM
blueballs, I agree "if your swing is right and hit the ball at the right moment, any decent racquet will generate lots of power.". But that's not the problem, the problem is when you are stretch, running to chase down a wide ball, have to meet the ball late, body in funny position, a tweener will allow you to do more with the ball. I agree heavy racket give you more power at the same swing speed, however, only IF you can apply the same swing speed, which I can't (I think mostly because of the tiny sweetspot with the PS6.0 85). Second, while I do not need to swing as hard with a heavy racket because of the mass of the racket, that's only part of the equation, spin is the other part, and spin is relate to swing speed mostly, and the lighter the racket, the faster is the swing speed.

rulik, I am a few years older than you, but I am only 135lbs. Thats the reason I said physical build seems to dictate how heavy a racket should a person use than skill.

BTW, I don't agree people should use light racket, but I also dont agree player's racket is a must. The rule is get the heaviest racket you can handle at the end of a long match, and it is different for eveyone.

As for me, I use PS 6.0 85 for practice and TiRad OS (tweener? player's racket?) for match.

Simbah2004
07-07-2005, 10:21 PM
To me it makes no sense to practice with one frame and play with another.
I used to play with the 85 and yes, I've developed sound strokes and all that.
But the truth is after I got better I started to play against better players, who can wail out the ball and change direction quickly. After a few sets, I just could not keep up with them anymore.

mucat
07-07-2005, 10:51 PM
Using different rackets make me understand my strokes better, different weight, different size rackets prefer and/or require different swing path. For a self taught person, it is just one of many ways to improve his/her games.