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View Full Version : Same name, different racquet


Mike Penick
07-18-2011, 04:13 PM
I recently purchased two used Prince TT Scream racquets. Much to my surprise they are different. The first one I got seems to be the same racquet sold by TW--I'll call it Scream 2. The other one is probably from the first generation of the racquet--"Scream 1".

Both are OS, by the way. Scream 2 has a noticeably smaller hoop than Scream 1 by about 1/4" in length. It is also over all about 1/4" shorter. Scream 2 has a Prince Power rating of B875, ("B" for balanced?) while Scream 1 has a Prince Power level rating of 850.

I thought I was getting an identical backup. I guess not! Can anybody explain this? I once bought a Head Atlantis 660 from Big 5 made in China that was very different from the made in Austria one my friend had, but then that was Big 5, which I know carries cheaper knockoffs.

Mike Penick
07-18-2011, 04:24 PM
I just finished re-stringing Scream 1, and I guess its old mains were pretty loose, because the new string job shortened the hoop, and now Scream 1 is almost the same size as Scream 2. The changed power level is still a question though. Is the flex the same in the two racquets?

Steve Huff
07-18-2011, 09:14 PM
You can look back through the threads for one called "Legal Fakes". When a company (like Prince, Head, Wilson, etc) discontinue a frame, a large retailer like Big 5, Dicks, Sports Authority, can buy the license to reproduce it. They have no obligation to reproduce it exactly as it was once made. After they purchase the license to reproduce it, they go through a "no name" manufacturer (usually in China) to produce a racket to their specs (including the price). This is profitable when they order several thousand frames (up to 50,000, maybe more in some instances). The original company makes money on a discontinued model and the retailer gets to hyper market yesteryear's products to unknowing buyers. I've seen 113 sq in Prince TT Rips (original was 115) and TT Thunderbolts that were 27.5" long (original was made BEFORE the TT technology and were 28" long). So, the next time you think you're getting a steal on a LM or Ti Head, Wilson Hammer or Prince TT (maybe even the O3's now) at a large sporting goods retail chain, just know it probably isn't the original.

VGP
07-18-2011, 09:25 PM
This even applies to frames from different production runs that span a few years not necessarily like what Steve Huff describes.

I'm not just talking the Belgian, Chicago, St. Vincent, Taiwanese, Chinese PS85s....

Back in the day I used the Prince Graphtech DB 110. I wanted to get another one after a couple of years and I bought a Prince Graphtech DB Oversize. Yes, the name changes slightly. Prince may have re-tooled the mold or something, but the profile of the second frame was thicker and the frame felt more dense. They frames just played differently from each other.

Ever since then if I settle on a match play frame, I'll purchase a few from relatively the same production run - 2 or 3 frames at least - and try to find ones with similar weight and balance. Minimizes the discrepancies.

Mike Penick
07-18-2011, 11:19 PM
Interesting inputs. I had no idea the racquet manufacturers sold the rights to their frames that way. Seems a bit sleazy. I'll hit with my newly strung racquet tomorrow and see how similar it is to my other one.

Bri-guy
07-18-2011, 11:50 PM
You can look back through the threads for one called "Legal Fakes". When a company (like Prince, Head, Wilson, etc) discontinue a frame, a large retailer like Big 5, Dicks, Sports Authority, can buy the license to reproduce it. They have no obligation to reproduce it exactly as it was once made. After they purchase the license to reproduce it, they go through a "no name" manufacturer (usually in China) to produce a racket to their specs (including the price). This is profitable when they order several thousand frames (up to 50,000, maybe more in some instances). The original company makes money on a discontinued model and the retailer gets to hyper market yesteryear's products to unknowing buyers. I've seen 113 sq in Prince TT Rips (original was 115) and TT Thunderbolts that were 27.5" long (original was made BEFORE the TT technology and were 28" long). So, the next time you think you're getting a steal on a LM or Ti Head, Wilson Hammer or Prince TT (maybe even the O3's now) at a large sporting goods retail chain, just know it probably isn't the original.

Not to be skeptical, but do you have a source? I would actually like to read up on this. Thanks!

Cheers!

Steve Huff
07-21-2011, 07:44 AM
Actually--yes. A guy brought a Prince Rip by for me to string and put new grommets in. The grommets wouldn't fit. I called Prince. Their customer service wouldn't say (or didn't know) any thing. I asked to speak to engineering. He's the one that told me 1st. He seemed a little disappointed to. He said that after these companies buy the rights to reproduce them. His words were, "Big retailers like Dicks, Big 5 and Sports Authority can buy enough to do this. They can distribute to their chains, so even 50,000 frames is not too big for them to produce and sell. They don't even go through Prince USA. They aren't required to." He even knew that the unoriginal frames were 113 sq in instead of 115, so somewhere, it must have been brought up in the past.