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View Full Version : Advantage of thick beams?


Gasolina
08-02-2011, 09:01 PM
Ok I was playing with my rqis when I noticed my polys go dead on serve. At the 2nd set I went to my spare tfight 325 and noticed I had a lot less frames on my groundstrokes. It seems that the tapered 25mm hoop of the yonex does affect me hitting with topspin. I use a ww forehand and 2 hand backhand and rely a lot on topspin.

Thick beams give you a smaller window for topspin shots, even tw has data on this.

So what are the advantages of thick beams? Is it stability on touch shots? I still had to add lead at the 3 and 9 on the rqis to make it stable to hit drop shots without twisting. And I'm pretty sure it doesn't affect power potential coz that's entirely on the mass of the hoop and thicker beams are usually hollow and lighter.

Anton
08-02-2011, 09:12 PM
Stability - wider body rackets have better torsional torque resistance per weight.

Gasolina
08-02-2011, 09:59 PM
Stability - wider body rackets have better torsional torque resistance per weight.
Does that mean that if my rqis had a 19mm beam with the same lead at the 3&9, it won't be as stable as it is now?

BobFL
08-02-2011, 10:10 PM
Does that mean that if my rqis had a 19mm beam with the same lead at the 3&9, it won't be as stable as it is now?

It does (ceteris paribus).

msalamon
08-03-2011, 06:44 AM
the Donnay has a super thin beam--and it does feel like there is some torsional resistance problems----ie. the racket feels like it quivers--especially on off center hits. I'm looking at some wider beam rackets--especially the Organix 8--which has a really wide beam

quest01
08-03-2011, 06:59 AM
Thicker beams like the Pure Drives, APDGTs, Extremes, offer more spin, power, and stability but less control.

BobFL
08-03-2011, 08:47 AM
... and thicker beams are usually hollow and lighter.

Actually it is more accurate to say that lighter racquets have thicker beams. Thicker beams simply compensate for the lack of mass and offer better stability.

SFrazeur
08-03-2011, 08:54 AM
Generally, they're stable, forgiving and powerful.

-SF

Gasolina
08-03-2011, 08:54 AM
Yikes... what does that say about the Dunlop 100's?

A friend of mine doesn't care about beam thickness because she plays exclusively on the baseline with full strokes. I prefer some torisonal stability in mine because I love playing around with drop shots and slices. I remember that heavier balls tend to twist my rqis before I added lead.

Thanks for the responses everyone. You've been very helpful.

fuzz nation
08-03-2011, 09:26 AM
I think there may be a discrepancy with our language here. When I make reference to the stability in a racquet, I'm talking about the racquet's resistance to being either pushed around or twisted in my hand at contact. I find more stability when a racquet is heavier, but I've also make the hoop of a middleweight racquet like my RQiS 1 Tour more stable by adding 3/9 o'clock lead tape.

Stability, at least for me, has a rather close relationship with a racquet's "plow-through".

If the beam of a racquet is wider, let's say in its hoop, that typically makes the hoop more stiff. I'll agree that this means that it's also more stable, but in terms of our general references to the properties of our gear, I'd say that wider beams make for more rigidity or stiffness instead of stability.

A lighter frame has less material in its layup, so if it's designed with a wider beam, it can have a greater measure of stiffness and power without also having a lot of inertia to bring to the collision.

Gasolina
08-03-2011, 09:34 AM
I think there may be a discrepancy with our language here. When I make reference to the stability in a racquet, I'm talking about the racquet's resistance to being either pushed around or twisted in my hand at contact. I find more stability when a racquet is heavier, but I've also make the hoop of a middleweight racquet like my RQiS 1 Tour more stable by adding 3/9 o'clock lead tape.

Stability, at least for me, has a rather close relationship with a racquet's "plow-through".

If the beam of a racquet is wider, let's say in its hoop, that typically makes the hoop more stiff. I'll agree that this means that it's also more stable, but in terms of our general references to the properties of our gear, I'd say that wider beams make for more rigidity or stiffness instead of stability.

A lighter frame has less material in its layup, so if it's designed with a wider beam, it can have a greater measure of stiffness and power without also having a lot of inertia to bring to the collision.
I think this hits the nail in the head. So in order to get more power out of a racquet, makers make thicker beams to make the hoop stiffer the racquet more powerful, w/o adding weight.

How about stability for touch shots? I never had problems with the RQiS XL twisting on groundstrokes but for touch shots, I really needed the extra lead.

Devilito
08-03-2011, 09:56 AM
Thicker beams simply compensate for the lack of mass and offer better stability.

pretty much the answer right there

thug the bunny
08-03-2011, 10:21 AM
The main benefit of thick beam frames is that they make you go running and screaming back to your thin beam sticks. Don't like them at all.