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The Ripper
08-08-2011, 07:23 PM
Okay, I'm actually thinking about plopping down $400 for a Bosworth. Any thoughts?

I have played all the Wilson PS line from the PS85 to the Federer to the Sampras, liking the heavier rackets. For something different, I tried and liked the Bab Pure Storm GT (about 2 oz lighter) a few months ago and have been very happy. Then a buddy of mine I hadn't played with for a year or so stepped up and knocked my racket out of my hand on serve! Ouch! The PSGT was no match to that much power. So back to the drawing board for a heavier racket.

I'm initially thinking the Pure Storm Ltd. GT, I've played on it a time or two and liked it, in fact I'm demoing a couple of them starting tomorrow. BUT (and a big butt) maybe it's time to quit messing around with lead and scales, different rackets, etc., etc. and just get a Bosworth! They have a pretty extensive questionnaire and they appear to be devoted to having the racket be as perfect for me as possible, with the ability to upgrade the racket as I improve (I am on the cusp of 3.5/4.0), so I thought now might be a good time to try something not just heavier but custom made.

Any thoughts?

Thanks guys!

HiroProtagonist
08-08-2011, 07:42 PM
I'd go with a Vantage personally.

Seth
08-08-2011, 07:49 PM
I'm intrigued by the complete devotion to customization, as well as Bosworth's dedication to tennis research (as far as creating a near-perfect racquet goes). If I could plop down the cash for three of them in Bosworth Blue, I would. Just my two cents.

counterpuncher
08-08-2011, 07:58 PM
Apart from a custom from Vantage which will be far cheaper, other options for heavier racquets would be a PST GT coming from your like of the light version, or something like a Dunlop 4D 200 Tour or Prince Rebel. All of these have good feedback and the sort of specs that you are after.

Power Player
08-08-2011, 08:04 PM
I have an inexpensive idea.

I call it lead. The PD is leaded up by open level players everywhere..I am sure you could change the stick quite a lot by trying that out.

VGP
08-08-2011, 08:17 PM
I have an inexpensive idea.

I call it lead. The PD is leaded up by open level players everywhere..I am sure you could change the stick quite a lot by trying that out.

Yeah but he said:

maybe it's time to quit messing around with lead and scales, different rackets, etc., etc.

I still think lead tape is the most economical option. Or lessons. If you can't handle your friend's big serve then it might not just be your racket.

BTW, Bosworth uses lead tape just like any other racket customization company along with their design options.

The Ripper
08-08-2011, 08:18 PM
Thanks for the replies.

I played with Vantages for about a year when they first came out. I really liked the frame and the quality did seem much better than a "store-bought" racket. However, I was still in the dilemma of knowing what the optimal weight/ balance and playing characteristics would help my game the most. I was sending the Vantages to Montgomery, S. Carolina (I think!) to have them customized, but they just asked me how I wanted the racket set up, they only asked me a couple questions about how I play, etc. - they just made the racket the way I asked them to be made. As a result, I sent them back and forth about three times (Ka-ching - expensive!) and liked them okay, but didn't think it was that much better than most other rackets.

So I guess I'm intrigued to try a racket which is "customized" for my personal characteristics. I would like it even better if I could have one of their tech guys make a video of me playing and go from that for getting the right set up. Of course all the pro's have heavily customized rackets all the way to the grip which is molded just for their grip of the hand. Also, Bosworth said the magic word - most rackets are too light. I've had very mixed luck customizing my own rackets, so I guess I give up.

I did play on the Prince Rebel for awhile - nice racket, no complaints, didn't really grab me; and yes, played on the Dunlop 4D for awhile too, also a nice racket, a little too stiff.

So now that I'm thinking about it, I think I need someone to either ask me a ton of questions about the way I play (which Bosworth more or less does on their website) or find a technician who will video/watch my game and then find the right racket/balance/weight to have it customized to my liking.

I guess bottom line is I like that Bosworth is willing to tweak the racket until it's right, and will continue tweaking it as I progress. :-?

VGP
08-08-2011, 08:25 PM
I've heard of Bosworth doing "clinics" where it's like going to the optometrist.

They'll have a bunch of frames with different specs, i.e. grip size, flex, balance, etc.

They let the participants try the different frames and see first hand what works, what doesn't, what the player likes/doesn't like.....

I think that would be a great type of event to attend.

The Ripper
08-08-2011, 08:26 PM
Thanks for the input everybody! It is helpful. :)

Yeah but he said:
I still think lead tape is the most economical option. Or lessons. If you can't handle your friend's big serve then it might not just be your racket.

BTW, Bosworth uses lead tape just like any other racket customization company along with their design options.

Yes, lead tape definitely cheaper! And I've been messing with it for at least 4-5 years with mixed results - I'm pretty mechanically minded, but haven't been able to get good results in my kitchen.

Lessons - yes, plenty of them, but no technique will make a lighter racket return a heavier racket pound-for-pound, which is why the pro's (at least the men - I don't know about the women) all play with much heavier rackets than most humans. The Bosworth site said up front that the key to stability and power is weight, but the weight has to be in the right places with the right balance. Call me stupid, but I haven't been able to do that on my own (but then I'm a perfectionist!).

The Ripper
08-08-2011, 08:28 PM
I've heard of Bosworth doing "clinics" where it's like going to the optometrist.

They'll have a bunch of frames with different specs, i.e. grip size, flex, balance, etc.

They let the participants try the different frames and see first hand what works, what doesn't, what the player likes/doesn't like.....

I think that would be a great type of event to attend.

WOW! I'd be down for that! Any information? I'll take a stroll through cyberspace on that one.

VGP
08-08-2011, 08:31 PM
I understand. I like to have what some call a hefty racket these days.

Mine are around 13 ounces, 6 points headlight. If I have lead tape it's at 3 and 9 or 10 and 2.

My thinking is the racket is used to hit a ball. It might be coming hard and I need mass to counteract it. If I want to hit it hard with force, I need weight behind my shot.

I want a little comfort in the hit and I've gravitated toward graphite/fiberglass composite frames.

That's kind of where I've nestled into spec wise.

The Ripper
08-08-2011, 09:03 PM
Hey VGP, yes, I've come to heavier rackets just from playing. I'm getting the balls back consistently, hitting decent serves, covering the court well, but I'm starting to play with guys who are using 12 oz.+ rackets and they are just getting more weight on the ball than me. I can hit it hard and fast, but not with as much weight. I played with the PS88 for about 6 months. I really loved that racket because it was actually less demanding than the "lighter" 11 oz rackets. If I had to go back for a big lob, I just needed to stick my strings out and give it a easy tap and that ball was way high and landing on the baseline. I never got as good of control with a lighter racket; and my forehands were going right on the baseline with enough spin on it to have them miss the ball completely (well, not ALL the time!). Maybe I gave up on the Sampras racket too soon. I worked hard to adapt my technique to the heavier racket, but honestly I would just poop out in a 3 setter - I guess I should have gotten in better shape.

Maybe I should just go buy another PS88 improve my and stamina (I'm still a young 54 yo).

dr325i
08-08-2011, 09:04 PM
WOW! I'd be down for that! Any information? I'll take a stroll through cyberspace on that one.

I know the guys from BW well and I can tell you, they are knowledgeable and devoted to tennis. They do have a program explained above in Boca Raton, FL and is worth attending. Heck, it is worth just walking into their office and seeing the walls of frames...
I realized that finding the right frame and the specs is probably more important than most of other things and BW will surely help you with that. Definitely worth the money...

Avadia
08-09-2011, 05:43 AM
If you are looking for a heavy stock racquet that won't get pushed around, I highly recommend you demo the PK Ionic Ki 5 PSE. 12.9 oz., 9 pts. HL, SW 345 and a 100 sq.in. hoop provides a lot of controlled power. Also, the Dunlop AG 4D 200 Tour recommended earlier is a great stick that is very stable.

prjacobs
08-09-2011, 05:46 AM
Living in Pasadena, I'm sure that you could find a high quality racquet consultant nearby who would have you hit with many different frames and give you sound advice. There used to be a guy in New York who did this for $500.

big bang
08-09-2011, 07:57 AM
Never used a bosworth myself, but from what I hear you will get the same service from Vantage and a lot cheaper. If you know your prefered specs its pretty easy to send your frames to one of the customizers like P1 or RPNY.
But what kind of frame are you looking for and do you know your prefered specs?. Noone can build the perfect frame for you if you cant tell them what your specs are.

FloridaAG
08-09-2011, 08:16 AM
Personally, I think you are better served working on your game as a 3.5 to 4.0 player rather than spending so much time, effort and $$ in looking for the holy grail of frames. IMO, there is no such thing and there is no way that in a pure cost-benefit analysis, that it would be worth it.

But with all that said, if you have the money to spend and really want a fully customized frame than go for it.

I personally would not use a frame with that head shape

VGP
08-09-2011, 08:18 AM
Never used a bosworth myself, but from what I hear you will get the same service from Vantage and a lot cheaper. If you know your prefered specs its pretty easy to send your frames to one of the customizers like P1 or RPNY.
But what kind of frame are you looking for and do you know your prefered specs?. Noone can build the perfect frame for you if you cant tell them what your specs are.

I think that's the issue. The Ripper isn't convinced what his preferred specs are.

A trial clinic like what Bosworth provides might be an eye (and game opener). You might think you know what's best, but it might not be.

I would like to participate in one. Either to confirm what I prefer or to maybe learn something new.

bigmatt
08-09-2011, 09:38 AM
I've heard of Bosworth doing "clinics" where it's like going to the optometrist.

They'll have a bunch of frames with different specs, i.e. grip size, flex, balance, etc.

They let the participants try the different frames and see first hand what works, what doesn't, what the player likes/doesn't like.....

I think that would be a great type of event to attend.

I attended one of these in the mid-80s when Bosworth was working with Fox. and it was great fun. Each court had the same racquets, but with one variable changed: weight, balance, flex, string type or tension. It was quite interesting how many people liked heavy, flexible frames with lower poundages.

VGP
08-09-2011, 09:42 AM
Heavy, flexible frames with lower poundages.

Sounds like my cup-o-tea. Too bad it isn't the 80s anymore.

I wonder what people would prefer today.

Buckethead
08-09-2011, 10:02 AM
Okay, I'm actually thinking about plopping down $400 for a Bosworth. Any thoughts?

I have played all the Wilson PS line from the PS85 to the Federer to the Sampras, liking the heavier rackets. For something different, I tried and liked the Bab Pure Storm GT (about 2 oz lighter) a few months ago and have been very happy. Then a buddy of mine I hadn't played with for a year or so stepped up and knocked my racket out of my hand on serve! Ouch! The PSGT was no match to that much power. So back to the drawing board for a heavier racket.

I'm initially thinking the Pure Storm Ltd. GT, I've played on it a time or two and liked it, in fact I'm demoing a couple of them starting tomorrow. BUT (and a big butt) maybe it's time to quit messing around with lead and scales, different rackets, etc., etc. and just get a Bosworth! They have a pretty extensive questionnaire and they appear to be devoted to having the racket be as perfect for me as possible, with the ability to upgrade the racket as I improve (I am on the cusp of 3.5/4.0), so I thought now might be a good time to try something not just heavier but custom made.

Any thoughts?

Thanks guys!

Go for it man.

The best quality of materials used which makes the racket play completely different from most of all the crap offered nowadays and made specifically to you, I mean, what else do you want?

It's another world. Sorry to say, but babocrap is cheap stuff, when you play with the Bosworth Tour 96 you'll see it. A friend of mine have the candy apple red and it is beautiful as well.

If I didn't have the rackets i have I'd buy them, I have modern feel(RDS and RQiS) and old feel(SRD and R-22)rackets but the SRD Tour and the R-22, as most don't like to buy old rackets, so I'd suggest.

If I'm not mistaken they start however at $499 but give Jay a call.

The Ripper
08-09-2011, 03:51 PM
Heavy, flexible frames with lower poundages.

Sounds like my cup-o-tea. Too bad it isn't the 80s anymore.

I wonder what people would prefer today.

That's what I'm talking about! Perhaps its because I grew up playing on wood rackets (I'm not 23 anymore in spite of my best efforts!). I like the "old style" feel. And to answer about specs, I have spec'd myself into oblivion. As VPG alluded to, I actually have quite a good idea of what my "ideal" specs would be, but I want the racket to be as close to perfect for me as possible! I would really like to have a pro tuner watch me play a bit and somehow figure out what specs would maximize my potential - I'm in pretty darned good shape, but I'm not getting any younger either.

And, going back to my first post, all the pro's have "custom" rackets, i.e., they have a coach/tuner who fine tunes their racket so it's perfect for that particular player (Sampras worked with Bosworth too, then Nate Ferguson; Pete tweaked his rackets maybe more than any player - they had to be perfect!) On the Bosworth site, they said Stepanek worked with them for 4 years (!!!) to get it exactly the way he wanted it (I'm pretty picky, but not THAT picky!).

I really don't want to pay $400 bucks for a racket, but I'm thinking about it. And, just played today with the Bab Pure Storm Ltd (12 oz strung) - I really liked it and felt great. Serves were a 10, stability on ground strokes maybe 8 out of 10, but I liked it. Also demoed the Avery M3 (control) racket: didn't serve with it as well as the Bab, but the Avery seemed much more solid on ground strokes. I have a pretty good serve, so would probably go for the serving rather than groundstrokes (I like to play all court).

Thanks again for the input. I may see if I can find a tuner here in Los Angeles (Lord knows there must be a darn good one around here someplace!). I've tried in the past with not good results.

The Ripper
08-09-2011, 04:36 PM
Go for it man.

The best quality of materials used which makes the racket play completely different from most of all the crap offered nowadays and made specifically to you, I mean, what else do you want?

That's what I'm thinking. I'm very tired of all the different specs, rackets, etc., etc. I do think it boils down to your personal specifications, and Bosworth certainly seems like a worthy and well-respected company. I think I saw that if you want them to watch you play and do all the tweaking on the racket according to your play, it costs $2500 - that's about $2000 more than I can afford :shock:! So I guess I would compromise and get the $400 deal yielding a racket which would be customized according to the fairly extensive questionnaire I filled out on their site. I also like that they will adjust your racket as your playing changes (who knows how much that may cost!).

So I'll just go one step at a time. If Bosworth is just too expensive, I'll probably stick with the Bab Pure Storm Ltd. I've got quick reflexes and like to play at the net, so I want a swingweight from say 304 to 325 or so - the racket needs to be quick and stable.

Thanks for the input!

royaldoyal
08-10-2011, 08:46 AM
I think you should. I play with a Estusa Pro Legend Classic, a racket that was discontinued 22 years ago (same model Connors played with back in 91&92) and are down to my last two frames.

I have played tested everything and can't beileve how poorly today rackets are made and feel. I'm actually going to hold out and see what comes out towards the end of this year from Wilson and Prince before I too decide to have a custom racket made myself.

Although Vantage is cheaper, I have spoken to their staff and must say that they have been unresponseive in helping me nail down a frame that suits me. Poor customer service!!

Upon speaking to Jay at Bosworth, he told me that they can build a racket that would be very similar to my Estusa. In fact, I was pumped up when they told they had a widebody mold that would be very similar to the racket I play with a 96 sq inch head. Jay said when I was ready, to send the Estusa if I didn't have the specs for my orginal racket, and they could match it up and build a great frame for me.

$400 is alot of cash to throw down on a racket but I'm convinced this is the way to go.