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Bertchel Banks
07-06-2005, 09:34 AM
Ted Robinson said he was Irish. Chris Fowler said he was Scottish. Which one is it?

He has the fair skin and funky eyebrows, so I'm thinking scot.

baseliner
07-06-2005, 09:42 AM
Native born American. Not even a hyphenated American.

Bertchel Banks
07-06-2005, 09:45 AM
Wasn't he born in Germany? Besides, you know what I mean.

Babblelot
07-06-2005, 10:02 AM
"Mc" could go either way; both the Scots and Irish have Gaelic origins. The only clue I've heard him utter is that he was a huge Notre Dame Irish football fan as a kid.

...ergo, I'd guess he's Irish.

Babblelot
07-06-2005, 10:04 AM
Wasn't he born in Germany? Besides, you know what I mean.
Nice catch.

Wiesbaden, Germany

AndrewD
07-06-2005, 10:50 AM
McEnroe's heritage is Irish. He's actually quite proud of it and it does come up in a number of stories written about him.

Far easier just to do a Google search and you'll probably get it straight from the horses mouth.

Dedans Penthouse
07-06-2005, 11:11 AM
I asked McEnroe's dad one time, what he usually bought his sons John and Patrick for Christmas when they were growing up, and he replied: "toy potatoes" ...... so yes, John McEnroe is in fact Irish.

As for the Scots,

Q: How do you break up an angry Scottish mob?
A: Take up a collection.

One Scot said to his friend: "Why Robert, I noticed you were giving your wife a driving lesson yesterday; how did it go?" And his friend replied: "Terrible! We were driving up a hill--all was fine--but when we reached the top of the hill and proceeded down the other side, the brakes failed!!" His friend cried: "Oh my! What did you do?!" And Robert replied: "I said to her,'hit something CHEAP!"

btw, Agassi's mom is of Irish heritage as well.

Camilio Pascual
07-06-2005, 11:57 AM
His friend cried: "Oh my! What did you do?!" And Robert replied: "I said to her,'hit something CHEAP!"


IOW:
ANY Scotsman.

Rabbit
07-06-2005, 12:15 PM
He's Irish. I'm Scotch/Irish. It's a real b!tch. I would be a drunk, but I'm too cheap to buy myself a drink.

Bertchel Banks
07-06-2005, 12:21 PM
He's Irish. I'm Scotch/Irish. It's a real b!tch. I would be a drunk, but I'm too cheap to buy myself a drink.

I thought the Dutch were the cheap ones.

Rabbit
07-06-2005, 12:27 PM
A Scot makes a Dutchman look like Santa Claus.

littlelleyton
07-06-2005, 12:42 PM
"Mc" could go either way; both the Scots and Irish have Gaelic origins. The only clue I've heard him utter is that he was a huge Notre Dame Irish football fan as a kid.

...ergo, I'd guess he's Irish.

this looks like it could get interesting,

could you explain exactly how both scots and irish people have "gaelic origins"? where were gaelic people before they came to scotland or ireland? as 1 of only 3 scots on this board i would be interest to here this and maybe could learn something new :)

im not reallt sure where the cheap thing is coming from as i think you will find that most scots are some of the hospitable people you will ever find to buy you a drink.

Morpheus
07-06-2005, 12:55 PM
I bolded the part where Mac refers to his "Irishness."


CONTROVERSIAL TENNIS STAR TALKS EXCLUSIVELY TO THE XPRESS

by Yvonne Judge

It was with a skipping heart that I found myself on Wednesday last, knocking on a dressing room door in Fitzwilliam Lawn Tennis Club and being admitted by the Great One himself, Mr JP McEnroe.
Most of the people there were, like myself, the kind who would not normally be allowed through the gates or even be admitted to membership - women.
You will be glad to know that he who once called for the grass at Wimbledon to be dug up was in fact fully clothed, and a good job too, for no words would have been written down with fevered pen if that was the case.
There he sat, clad in faded 501s, T-shirt and jacket supping a pint of Guinness and apparently pleased to shoot the breeze with the small selection of Irish media present, which considering the treatment meted out to him over the years is a lot more generous than some others in recent times who have been the benfeiciaries of fans-with-typewriters coverage.
McEnroe was in town to do a favour for another ex-Irish Press journalist, one Mr John O'Shea, who was running his fifth tennis ‘occasion' in aid of GOAL and specifically in this case Rwanda. And it was after a transatlantic flight, a hop over from London and a police escort that McEnroe took to the court ("Is it always this warm here?") and played two matches, showing regular glimpses of his brilliance of yore, all with the customary figetting, muttering and of course glaring at the linesman.
"Look, this is easy for me, all I do is go on court and hit a few balls, what about the people out there, that's what this is for,'' he told the crowd.

Later, it was philosophy time with the man who could have played tennis for Ireland.
"I am American sure, but I do feel a real affinity here and obviously there's an Irishness in me. Like when I'm shouting back at a linesman or something. I mean, there are so many incidents that I actually couldn't pick out the one I regret most, but then again I don't know if I do regret them. I would have loved it sometimes if an umpire or linesman had just said: "Look, **** off you little ****.'' It's like part of the sport, and maybe they should have had more of a go at me. Mind you, I think you are more like that here than in England; you shout back and say your piece, but in Britian there is a tradition of putting up and shutting up, though mind you I think even that is changing now."
These days his outbursts, both of frustration and brilliance, are confined to charity and exhibition matches, which he describes as ‘the old men's circuit.'
"Maybe it is nostalgia, but we were very very lucky when I was playing because you had Jimmy and Borg and then along came me to add to the mix, and it was great to have the three. Now there's Pete Sampras and Andre but they really need a third to spice it up and add a different style again for the game. There's Becker who is still good but the fact is that he has already played the best tennis of his career and he's only twenty-six. As for the women, it's even worse, I mean they will do anything to get Seles back at this stage."
"Agassi is good for the game and I don't think he is contrived or that he is trying to imitate me. Sure, he learnt from me and I'm happy to help him, but his whole style thing, I mean, Andre is from Vegas and that's a pretty strange town let me tell you. I just try to keep my feet on the ground and look after my kids. I mean, I live in New York City and you walk out the door and there are the homeless, and I hope my kids can keep on the level if they can. It's bad enough having me as a father but with Tatum as a mother as well they're up against it."
And so McEnroe went off to have his meal and later, his doubles partner Peter Fleming lowered pints and chatted to the natives in the bar. "This is Yvonne Judge,'' said O'Shea to Fleming, "the newpaper that she and I worked for is about to be liquidated''.
"Cheers,'' replied Fleming. Clearly osmosis of brain matter does not occur between doubles partners.

Dedans Penthouse
07-06-2005, 02:15 PM
Am Scotch/Irish...would get drunk...but too cheap to buy myself a drink.
You think the "mics" are party/booze animals?....you should check out Finland on a Friday/Saturday night!

Q: What's the favorite "spectator sport" in Finland?
A: The "d.t.'s --- (i.e. "delirium tremens")

this looks like it could get interesting,

could you explain exactly how both scots and irish people have "gaelic origins"? where were gaelic people before they came to scotland or ireland? as 1 of only 3 scots on this board i would be interest to here this and maybe could learn something new :)

im not reallt sure where the cheap thing is coming from as i think you will find that most scots are some of the hospitable people you will ever find to buy you a drink.
No argument here littleleyon--just teasing. And Btw, I AM buying. ;-)

As to the "Gaelic" they were a group of people from western Europe who settled in Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland. In Ireland for example, they set up around 150 or so "petty kingdoms" that were independent of one another, but shared the same language (Gaelic), and a class of men called the brehons.

Now, am I a history professor? Nope, but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night!"

loopy
07-06-2005, 02:21 PM
I'm half Scottish and I'm not cheap, I guess that's the other half of me. My aunt who lives in Scotland also is not cheap.

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 01:59 AM
You think the "mics" are party/booze animals?....you should check out Finland on a Friday/Saturday night!

Q: What's the favorite "spectator sport" in Finland?
A: The "d.t.'s --- (i.e. "delirium tremens")


No argument here littleleyon--just teasing. And Btw, I AM buying. ;-)

As to the "Gaelic" they were a group of people from western Europe who settled in Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland. In Ireland for example, they set up around 150 or so "petty kingdoms" that were independent of one another, but shared the same language (Gaelic), and a class of men called the brehons.

Now, am I a history professor? Nope, but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night!"


i know your just teasing its all in good jest, where are you from btw? the other thing about a scot is that we may well be very hospitable but were also never going to turn down a drink so you will be held to that offer :D

http://w w w . b b c . c o . u k / h i s t o r y / s c o t t i s h h i s t o r y / i n d e x . s h t m l

if your interested.



Babblelot- http://w w w . s c o t t i s h h i s t o r y . c o m / a r t i c l e s / m i s c / m a c v s m c . h t m l

this should help with any misunderstanding of Mc and Mac

Yours!05
07-07-2005, 02:32 AM
could you explain exactly how both scots and irish people have "gaelic origins"? where were gaelic people before they came to scotland or ireland? as 1 of only 3 scots on this board i would be interest to here this and maybe could learn something new :)
im not reallt sure where the cheap thing is coming from as i think you will find that most scots are some of the hospitable people you will ever find to buy you a drink.Isn't it a bit strange that you don't know anything about your own history or antecedents? :o

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 03:01 AM
Isn't it a bit strange that you don't know anything about your own history or antecedents? :o

you are assuming alot by saying this and you know what they say about assuming dont you?
who said i didnt know about my own history? could i not have been asking exactly what Babblelot knew about scotland and its history? if i wanted a history lesson do you think, since you assume i need it, i would post on a tennis website and ask someone who is not from scotland for this information? ;)

pound cat
07-07-2005, 03:58 AM
yours!105. People are only cheap when thye have to be...ie Scots were not cheap, they were frugal, trying to eke out a living in that rocky and cold and windy country but beautiful they lived in. That's why so many of them emigrated. The Irish were forced to emigrate or starve because a number of poor farming years (potatoes was their staple crop...the Potato Famine) . And if you're born Irish, you are Irish...and look at all the wannabe Irishmen on March 17. (St. Patrick's day) McEnroe has an Irish/Catholic background (so I presume his family is from northern Ireland)

Yours!05
07-07-2005, 04:33 AM
yours!105. People are only cheap when thye have to be...ie Scots were not cheap, they were frugal, trying to eke out a living in that rocky and cold and windy country but beautiful they lived in. That's why so many of them emigrated. The Irish were forced to emigrate or starve because a number of poor farming years (potatoes was their staple crop...the Potato Famine) . And if you're born Irish, you are Irish...and look at all the wannabe Irishmen on March 17. (St. Patrick's day) McEnroe has an Irish/Catholic background (so I presume his family is from northern Ireland)Why me pound cat? I was curious about the questions posed by littlelleyton, as follows:could you explain exactly how both scots and irish people have "gaelic origins"? where were gaelic people before they came to scotland or ireland? as 1 of only 3 scots on this board i would be interest to here this and maybe could learn something new :) FYI - one of our boys pipes in the haggis every Christmas;) and my own special subject is Sassenach History. (And I know the words of The Wearing of the Green in (Irish) Gaelic, as taught to me by my grandfather.) Slainte!

AndrewD
07-07-2005, 04:44 AM
pound cat,

if it wasn't for the Irish, Australia would only have a third its current population. Of course, quite a few of those initial 'settlers' weren't exactly here by choice LOL. In general, scratch an Anglo-Australian and you'll find he's at least half Irish. Then, of course, you've got somewhere like Brisbane, where I live, which is pretty much the town that Paddy built.

littlelleyton,

what part of Scotland are you from?

pound cat
07-07-2005, 04:46 AM
Ooops Yours!105, my post was meant for loopy not you. In Canada there are pipes everywhere...bands, individuals busking, at weddings, men wearing kilts (I think the man I saw wearing one yesterday was going to work) and this isn't even the part of Canada where Scots /Irish settled (which is the E. coast because it looked like Scotland/Ireland)

pound cat
07-07-2005, 04:52 AM
AndrewD, I'm not a Scot at all, (but I've been to Scotland) my family is from Eastern Europe, but there is a similarity in attitude to life from people whose heritage stems from emigration which is not by choice, especially the Irish our my case.

Yours!05
07-07-2005, 04:59 AM
Ooops Yours!105, my post was meant for loopy not you. In Canada there are pipes everywhere...bands, individuals busking, at weddings, men wearing kilts (I think the man I saw wearing one yesterday was going to work) and this isn't even the part of Canada where Scots /Irish settled (which is the E. coast because it looked like Scotland/Ireland)All in jest:) It is OK of course to tease established immigrant groups about their alleged shortcomings, eg deep pockets and short arms, because we can afford to take it on the chin;)

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 05:30 AM
Why me pound cat? I was curious about the questions posed by littlelleyton, as follows:FYI - one of our boys pipes in the haggis every Christmas;) and my own special subject is Sassenach History. (And I know the words of The Wearing of the Green in (Irish) Gaelic, as taught to me by my grandfather.) Slainte!

you may have been curious but you also assummed didnt you?? im not sure what the relevance of 1 of your boys pipes, you know 1 or maybe more irish songs and you have an interest in a term that scots have for an english man has on what my question was but i hope your mind is at rest now that i have answered your original query.

Moran Taing

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 05:40 AM
Im from Dundee, city on the north east coast right by the North Sea

Yours!05
07-07-2005, 05:54 AM
im not sure what the relevance of 1 of your boys pipes, you know 1 or maybe more irish songs and you have an interest in a term that scots have for an english man has on what my question wasI hoped that the addressee, pound cat, might find it pertinent, but hey, win some/lose some.i hope your mind is at restQuite thanks.now that i have answered your original query.Clear as. Definitely.

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 06:13 AM
I hoped that the addressee, pound cat, might find it pertinent, but hey, win some/lose some.Quite thanks.Clear as. Definitely.


oh i see now you were proving how irish your are because you know someone that pipes and you know a song your grandfather taught you. i see its clear now. :D just kiddn
im still a little aloss for where your specialist subject of Sassenach History comes in to this whole thing and how you managed to get interested in such a subject like this???

where was your grandfather from?

AndrewD
07-07-2005, 06:28 AM
littlelleyton,

My ex-girlfriend was from Forfar so we visited Dundee on a trip to see her relatives. Nice countryside, can't say the same for Forfar or the ex-girlfriend LOL.

Sorry to hear about the incident in London. Hopefully you've no family to worry about there.

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 06:33 AM
littlelleyton,

My ex-girlfriend was from Forfar so we visited Dundee on a trip to see her relatives. Nice countryside, can't say the same for Forfar or the ex-girlfriend LOL.

Sorry to hear about the incident in London. Hopefully you've no family to worry about there.

thanks andrew, yea i have friends down there and they "missed" it by about 1/2 hour. we have been trying to get in touch all day and just got them at lunch time.

LMAO forfar...thats too funny. how old are you, when were you here? any further north than dundee and it gets a bit funny... ;)

Dedans Penthouse
07-07-2005, 07:24 AM
i know your just teasing its all in good jest, where are you from btw? the other thing about a scot is that we may well be very hospitable but were also never going to turn down a drink so you will be held to that offer :D
I'm north of N.Y. city (northern suburbs). Have Gaelic, English, Scandia ancestry but am a died-in-the-wool Yankee. And, I "will be held to that offer?" -- would be my pleasure. ;-)

Got another one for ya, littleleyton:

Three men walk into a an old pub on the shores of a fishing village; an Irishman, and Englishman and a Scot. They order three pints of ale. Overhead there are a couple of flies buzzing around the light. The flies catch wind of the brew and desend downward to investigate. A fly ends up getting caught in the foam "head" of each one of the pints. The Englishman (being a bit of a priss), was throughly revolted and pushed his mug away from him. The Scotsman stuck his fingers in the foam, fished out the fly and drank from it as if nothing had happened. The Irishman? He too fished the fly out of HIS mug of ale, then gently squeezed the fly and bellowed: "Spit it out, ya ba$****!! SPIT IT OUT!!!"

Sla inte chugat
(good health to you)

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 07:38 AM
dedans - where abouts in NY? ive spent a fair bit of time in NYC over the last 6 years as ive been working at a summer camp in NH and always flew in and out of JFK.i have friends that live in the village by washington street. i was last in NYC for new years for 2 weeks and am planning on being there at the start of january for 2 weeks again? maybe get a hit lol

Dedans Penthouse
07-07-2005, 08:22 AM
Westchester (just north of N.Y.C.).
I am very familiar with "the granite state" (N.H.)....ah those were the days.....of skinny-dippin' and drinkin' with bow-legged women :-)

There are a number of tennis camps in N.H., at Bretton Woods in the White Mts., in the "lakes" region at Dartmouth Univ. in Hanover. Where abouts did you do your camping stint?

Joe Average
07-07-2005, 08:50 AM
I was told that the prefix "Mc" was Irish and "Mac" was Scottish. I don't know if this is a hard and fast rule ... but it works generally. So to call McEnroe "Mac" would be confusing his heritage.

I was also told that the term "paddy wagon" (the police vehicle) was a bit of a slur (the wagon to pick up the drunk "paddys" at the end of the night)... in the same way the word "gyp" (from Gypsies) might be construed.

irishbanger
07-07-2005, 09:18 AM
The MacEnroe clan is from County Cavan, which is the Northernmost county in the Republic. It's not a Northern Irish county.

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 09:19 AM
I was told that the prefix "Mc" was Irish and "Mac" was Scottish. I don't know if this is a hard and fast rule ... but it works generally. So to call McEnroe "Mac" would be confusing his heritage.



this is not the case and i do not know where people think this comes from. i can assure you that i have never heard of this explaination of this at any time in history except from people that are not scottish or irish and are guessing.
if you go the the link above ( with out the spaces) which i posted earlier it will clear this up.

Dedans - i was based in the lakes region, just off Winnipesaukee in Tuftonboro. it wasnt a specialised tennis camp but still got to play tennis in wonderful weather all summer long. How old are you of you dont mind me asking?

littlelleyton
07-07-2005, 09:42 AM
The MacEnroe clan is from County Cavan, which is the Northernmost county in the Republic. It's not a Northern Irish county.


MacEnroe fairly numerous: Cavan-Longford-Monaghan. Ir. Mac Conruabha, Ruabha is probably a place-name. Generally associated with Breifne, (Cavan-Leitrim).