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View Full Version : One of my worst tennis faults - a bad memory


danno123
09-21-2011, 05:18 AM
I've come to the conclusion that one of my worst faults is the fact that I can't remember points and matches. For example, I lost to a guy a month or so ago 6-0, 6-1 but after the match if you had asked me why I lost or how he beat me, I couldn't have told you. After a match, I rack my brain trying to recall how my opponent beat me but I honestly cannot recall.

This morning I played the same guy and it was much closer (I lost 6-4 but was ahead 3-0 in the second set when we had to quit). I now know how he beat me before - he hit soft deep balls with placement and I'd make an unforced error. The only reason I realized this during today's match is because yesterday I set up the ball machine to hit me these exact balls. I set it up for random direction deep soft balls and I forced myself to hit 5 safe balls before I tried to hit a winner. This morning as I was playing him I recall thinking "this is exactly what the ball machine was doing yesterday."

I think I need to start videotaping my matches and reviewing them afterwards because it's tough for me to improve because I don't know why I'm losing matches.

charliefedererer
09-21-2011, 05:37 AM
You are already on the right path because you have recognized this problem.

Rather than a complex high tech approach like video tape of your matches (be honest, do you have the time to break them down with analysis?) is just to have the discipline to take some notes after each match.

Just set up a file on your i-pad to keep track of your matches. You can make it as complex as you want to. But even just jotting down a few key observations can be very helpful in your self analysis of problems and potential solutions.

"I write entirely to find out what I'm thinking, what I'm looking at, what I see and what it means. What I want and what I fear."
(Joan Didion)

halalula1234
09-21-2011, 05:37 AM
normally when i loose a match its because of the errors :(. Less often its opponent's winners. However its so much more frustrating to loose from ur own errors! !!! :(

LuckyR
09-21-2011, 09:50 AM
I've come to the conclusion that one of my worst faults is the fact that I can't remember points and matches. For example, I lost to a guy a month or so ago 6-0, 6-1 but after the match if you had asked me why I lost or how he beat me, I couldn't have told you. After a match, I rack my brain trying to recall how my opponent beat me but I honestly cannot recall.

This morning I played the same guy and it was much closer (I lost 6-4 but was ahead 3-0 in the second set when we had to quit). I now know how he beat me before - he hit soft deep balls with placement and I'd make an unforced error. The only reason I realized this during today's match is because yesterday I set up the ball machine to hit me these exact balls. I set it up for random direction deep soft balls and I forced myself to hit 5 safe balls before I tried to hit a winner. This morning as I was playing him I recall thinking "this is exactly what the ball machine was doing yesterday."

I think I need to start videotaping my matches and reviewing them afterwards because it's tough for me to improve because I don't know why I'm losing matches.

Just like most cases where folks blame their memory for the inability to recall information, I would bet you that your memory is fine, but that you aren't putting the information you seek into your memory in the first place. But by recognising that you are interested in why you are losing points, hopefully you will do a better job of paying attention up front. Ideally you should be evaluating this question during the match, not afterwards, otherwise how do you know to try Plan B, if you don't even know what was wrong with Plan A?

LeeD
09-21-2011, 09:53 AM
I think I need some selective memory, because I'm a serve and volley dude, and need to be able to forget my opponent's winners, so I can confidently move to net position as often as possible.
If I can accurately remember ALL my opponent's passing shots, I'd be shaky and tremoring every time I approach net, and end up playing safely from the baseline.

danno123
09-21-2011, 10:19 AM
Just like most cases where folks blame their memory for the inability to recall information, I would bet you that your memory is fine, but that you aren't putting the information you seek into your memory in the first place. But by recognising that you are interested in why you are losing points, hopefully you will do a better job of paying attention up front. Ideally you should be evaluating this question during the match, not afterwards, otherwise how do you know to try Plan B, if you don't even know what was wrong with Plan A?

I know I should be analyzing the match as I play but I don't. I really need to work on strategy. Anyone know any good books on the subject?

Right now, I basically have a two-step plan for every point: (1) hit the ball where he ain't; (2) repeat step one as necessary.

Swissv2
09-21-2011, 10:31 AM
First steps to take...try to become more aware of the matches you play. See if you can actively remember the points better.

If that is not working, then work your way to recording the game in some sort of way.

dozu
09-21-2011, 10:58 AM
I know I should be analyzing the match as I play but I don't. I really need to work on strategy. Anyone know any good books on the subject?

Right now, I basically have a two-step plan for every point: (1) hit the ball where he ain't; (2) repeat step one as necessary.

this sounds typical for a certain category of players who just whack the ball... which is fine... it's one legit way to play.

then there is the other end of the spectrum... 80% of my mental energy is used for strategy, only 20% for technical stuff.... there is so much going on..

what's working, what's not, how I am feeling, is he tight or loose, is he sustaining certain level of play etc.

LuckyR
09-21-2011, 11:26 AM
I know I should be analyzing the match as I play but I don't. I really need to work on strategy. Anyone know any good books on the subject?

Right now, I basically have a two-step plan for every point: (1) hit the ball where he ain't; (2) repeat step one as necessary.

The simplest thing to notice is did I hit a winner, did I make an UE or did he do either?

Adjust as necessary.

r2473
09-21-2011, 11:31 AM
Everyone is acting as if we live most of our "normal" life on a reflective plan of consciousness. And then somehow make logical adjustments based upon pure understanding and reason.

Ojibway
09-21-2011, 11:58 AM
This is exactly what I do and with every repetition the speed of stroke is faster....often I end up frustrated and loosing the point because the ball keeps coming back :)

Swissv2
09-21-2011, 12:30 PM
I know I should be analyzing the match as I play but I don't. I really need to work on strategy. Anyone know any good books on the subject?

Right now, I basically have a two-step plan for every point: (1) hit the ball where he ain't; (2) repeat step one as necessary.

FuzzyYellowBalls talks about the concept of where to hit a ball during a rally. You can find the channel on youtube: FYB2007

You will notice, even in the high level matches, the PROs do not always hit the ball "where the person 'ain't"

junbumkim
09-21-2011, 01:04 PM
If you ever read interviews from Hewitt, he can recollect a lot of points, what shots were played, and what happened.

It just shows that how aware he is of how match is being played. Once you start getting into the habit of reflecting after each point and game, you can probably remember it much better.

danno123
09-21-2011, 05:15 PM
If you ever read interviews from Hewitt, he can recollect a lot of points, what shots were played, and what happened.

It just shows that how aware he is of how match is being played. Once you start getting into the habit of reflecting after each point and game, you can probably remember it much better.

Yep, I'm sure it's a skill and like any other skill gets better with focused practice. I've spent most of my time so far working on my baseline groundstrokes. I'm pretty happy with them now, so now I'm working on my serve and volleys, both of which need a lot of work. Then I need to focus on the mental side of the game.

thug the bunny
09-22-2011, 09:59 AM
I don't remember entire points, but I clearly remember certain shots because they stood out being either really good or really bad. Thus after a match I can make an assessment of what is working for me and what is not.

Cindysphinx
09-22-2011, 11:37 AM
Do you play fast?

If you take a moment after every point (while gathering balls, etc.) to reflect on what just happened and what you could have done better, I will bet you will remember things better.

user92626
09-22-2011, 01:25 PM
Do you guys play with those or yourself who quickly forget the score? By quick I mean like right after the first point!

I played doubles with some people last night, and I was surprised to see so many times that after fairly long points, 5-10 shot exchange where everyone ran like mad, they all forgot the score. I'm a good score keeper (cuz the score is usually in my favor :) and I hate to play in doubt) but after so much questioning I started to lose my memory a bit!

Also, I know it's a drag to switch court at odd game and many (older) folks do not like it but they're also the ones who tend to (conveniently) forget the game score!!! :)

LeeD
09-22-2011, 01:34 PM
I always call out the game score when I'm serving, and will usually call out the game score with nobody else does when I'm not serving.
At our courts, we change sides every 3 games, and that get's newcomer's confused to the point of arguments.
Time is of essence for the rich.