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View Full Version : Ground strokes video, 4.0 Tips please


drnantu
09-27-2011, 03:36 AM
Well, about time to post a video again. I have been playing for 3.0 years and about 4.0. Here is my ground strokes video. Tips and comments please.
BTW, if you look through my old posts, you will see my progress.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ0Z3G6mGTg

I fell the next jump from 4.0 to 4.5 will take very very long.

Giannis
09-27-2011, 04:16 AM
Hit through the ball more with more pace and run around your backhand less.

papa
09-27-2011, 04:31 AM
Lot of good things here and your making good progress. I'd like to see a more rotation into the ball/a great deal more racquet speed - realize your just hitting but we need more racquet speed and stop running around most of the backhands.

There are several technical aspects I'd have you work on but I think its looking pretty good.

dozu
09-27-2011, 05:04 AM
looks pretty good overall.

fh looks good.. i'd like to see your left hand hold on to the racket neck a bit longer so it promotes more unit turn in the backswing and allow the right arm to relax.... once the left hand lets go, the right arm should be free fall into the racket drop... right now the right arm is 'orphaned' for a couple of seconds .. these tiny things do make a difference between 4.0 and 4.5s

the bh, not 2 bad, but needs more unit turn as well....also when you practice/play the bh side is not given enough attention... in practice you hit 9 fh for every 1 bh... and in play your opp doesn't pound the bh enough, as that appears to be the weaker wing.

Limpinhitter
09-27-2011, 06:44 AM
Well, about time to post a video again. I have been playing for 3.0 years and about 4.0. Here is my ground strokes video. Tips and comments please.
BTW, if you look through my old posts, you will see my progress.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ0Z3G6mGTg

I fell the next jump from 4.0 to 4.5 will take very very long.

Your fh looks good. Good footwork, good set up, good upper body rotation. I like the fact that you don't close the racquet face on your windup. I think Dozu is right about the unit turn. You do it well most of the time, but, you should make a habit of turning with both hands on the racquet and then extending your left hand out parallel to the baseline. This will ensure a consistent turn. You could also load up a little more, meaning bend your knees in the windup and explode up at the ball at contact. Some people call it "sit and lift." Those two techniques will make your fh more consistent and more powerful.

I didn't see much of your bh, but, from what I did see, that's where you need to focus most of your efforts. Your bh is not at the level of your fh, and it needs to be in order to be competitive at 4.5. Otherwise, you'll be getting bh's all day, and you won't be getting many chances to hit your fh. Can you hit a slice? It's essential for returns of serve, hitting on the stretch and approach shots.

I didn't see any serves or net play, so, those are an open question at this point.

Rubens
09-27-2011, 07:10 AM
Very good strokes. I noticed that on most of your fh's, you transfer your weight completely from right foot to left foot BEFORE you hit the ball. That is ok, but you can achieve more pace if you time things a bit differently, as follows: weight on right foot, begin the weight transfer to left foot, hit the ball, then finish the transfer to the left foot. Thus, the time the ball meets your racquet is in the middle of your weight transfer, as opposed to being after it. It's a small detail, but it works for me.

netguy
09-27-2011, 08:05 AM
I would get more rooted to the ground by using a more forward stance, which would improve your hips' speed rotation and therefore your pace.
Good luck!

Giannis
09-27-2011, 10:40 AM
Very good strokes. I noticed that on most of your fh's, you transfer your weight completely from right foot to left foot BEFORE you hit the ball. That is ok, but you can achieve more pace if you time things a bit differently, as follows: weight on right foot, begin the weight transfer to left foot, hit the ball, then finish the transfer to the left foot. Thus, the time the ball meets your racquet is in the middle of your weight transfer, as opposed to being after it. It's a small detail, but it works for me.

I think it depends on whether the ball is coming to your forehand or to your backhand and you run around it to hit a forehand. In the first case you hit the ball while the weight is still on the right foot, while in the second case the weight has transfered to the left foot.

You can see it in this vid of Federer's forehands too :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ImeQaAyFPc
In the first forehand the weight is on the right foot and on the second forehand it is on the left foot.

Rubens
09-27-2011, 06:17 PM
I think it depends on whether the ball is coming to your forehand or to your backhand and you run around it to hit a forehand. In the first case you hit the ball while the weight is still on the right foot, while in the second case the weight has transfered to the left foot.

You can see it in this vid of Federer's forehands too :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ImeQaAyFPc
In the first forehand the weight is on the right foot and on the second forehand it is on the left foot.

I agree to a certain extent. However, I think that particular video shows a warmup in which Fed is hitting a bit lazily. I believe that in the strongest forehands (with most pace), the the ball touches the racquet DURING the weight transfer. Look at some of Fed's winners in this video (all in match situations):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uo51mYW2DA&feature=related

In most of these winners, when he strikes the ball, he hasn't finished his weight transfer. It seems the weight goes from his right foot, through his body to the racquet, and then finishes on his left foot. I don't know how to call it, but it just seems right.

Cheetah
09-27-2011, 10:43 PM
thanks for posting the vid. overall good.
i think you need to load more on your right foot and work on the proper weight transfer. you're only putting a little bit of weight on it and not enough 'explosion' via sit and lift and sometimes you transfer weight to left foot too soon and sometimes no transfer.
also looks like you release wrist too early. need to work on keeping it laid back throughout the stoke.
some good hits in there. a few too many shots like the one at 4:12.
good luck

TennisCJC
09-29-2011, 10:18 AM
Great game for 3 years playing.

FH basics are solid, footwork looks good, and it seems you have very good athletic ability which implies you have the potential to play very good tennis.

2nd a few comments above - yes, you are just hitting with a friend but work on more racket head speed when you are presented with a good ball. In other words, work on being aggressive when you get a chance but without pushing your error count up dramatically. In a nut shell, your forehand is good enough to work on turning it into a weapon but pick your spots wisely.

FH swing is relatively compact - keep it that way. You can generate pace with a compact relaxed swing.

As others said above, BH needs work but so does mine. Work on running around 2nd serves and short balls and hitting inside out and inside in FH. I like inside out FH and it goes into righties backhand.

Add a good slice to your BH side. It is very valuable against hi balls, kick serves, very wide balls, and as an approach shot.

Did not see any volleys. Work on becoming a complete player. If you are going to continue with 1 HBH, then I think you need the ability to attack the net and close points. Work on volleys, 1/2 volleys, and overheads everytime you practice. Also, you'll be an old fart like me one day and end up playing a lot of doubles. A good net game is invaluable in doubles.

JackB1
09-29-2011, 10:29 AM
I see ZERO racquet drop before the forward swing on your forehand. Your wrist has no flex and hingle action to it. It's like your arm is attached to the racquet handle. Learn to relax the right wrist and let it bend back and then let the racquet drop before the forward and up swing.

No offense, but if you have been able to win at 4.0 with that technique, I would be very surprised.

dr325i
09-29-2011, 11:08 AM
I see ZERO racquet drop before the forward swing on your forehand. Your wrist has no flex and hingle action to it. It's like your arm is attached to the racquet handle. Learn to relax the right wrist and let it bend back and then let the racquet drop before the forward and up swing.

No offense, but if you have been able to win at 4.0 with that technique, I would be very surprised.

Some valid comments except the last line which is a total nonsence...

JackB1
09-29-2011, 11:22 AM
Some valid comments except the last line which is a total nonsence...

I probably didn't say that correctly, since winning has nothing to do with technique. But that said, I don't see many 4.0 that have that "straight arm/straight wrist" technique ala Connors.

dozu
09-29-2011, 11:30 AM
i don't see why OP cannot compete in the 4.0s... he almost has the same game/level as TonyGao.

10sLifer
09-29-2011, 11:33 AM
Well, about time to post a video again. I have been playing for 3.0 years and about 4.0. Here is my ground strokes video. Tips and comments please.
BTW, if you look through my old posts, you will see my progress.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ0Z3G6mGTg

I fell the next jump from 4.0 to 4.5 will take very very long.

As long as you buy into the theory that you have to come across the ball or over the ball or make any other intentional motion other than coming from under the ball with a closed racquet face and swinging towards your target your development is hampered.

You'll see many times your racquet is on edge when it drops. That makes it open at contact...unless you make that intentional flippy motion which I am sure the people in this forum will compliment you on. The flippy motion is really just a mechansim to get the racquet vertical at contact. This prevents you from having a hitting zone, going to the net and can also cause injury.

Here is a video on fundamentals (Fundamental - serving as a basis supporting existence or determining essential structure)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8teOPv0xpk&feature=channel_video_title

Best,

q4short
09-29-2011, 01:53 PM
not really a groundstrokes video.. its mainly all forehands. Don't just focus on strengthening what you're most comfortable with all the time. Practice your BH side too. My BH is definitely my weaker wing as well, and I agree with what was said above about getting a backhand slice... the slice is all about control and when you learn it, it helps with controlling your volleys

drnantu
09-30-2011, 09:08 PM
Thanks for all the comments and tips.
I agree with most of the comments here:
1: More unit turn by using the left arm to push the racket back and release the racket much later than current. Extend the left arm and point it to the incoming ball. This is an old problem with I have been working on but am making very little progress.
2: More racquet head speed by having a relaxed wrist (proronation, maybe?) which will allow the racquet head accelerate just before contact. Thus, more pop.
3: Close the racquet face more during take back.
4: More backhand practice, top spin and more slice.

I feel the 1 and 2 are my priority right now.

When I say 3 years of practice which really means 3 years since I picked up the game again after 15 years of absence. I hit for couple of years lonnnnnnnnngggggg time ago.

I hope to make to NTRP 4.5 in 2-3 years. It is getting tougher and tougher to find qualified and FREE hitting partners.

Thanks again for every one. I learned a lot from reading posts from this board.

dozu
10-01-2011, 05:41 AM
3 years aint bad.. I suppose OP must have other background like soccer and ping pong etc... as long as practice is done with purpose, this level certainly is achievable for an athletic person.

for the next level, you need to see tougher opps... but even with the current opps, if you can beat them 6-0, 6-1 all the time, you basically arrive at 4.5