PDA

View Full Version : OCD ball bouncers


Lawn Tennis
10-05-2011, 10:41 PM
So I was playing a friend today who bounces the ball about as many times as Djokovic (I'm not exaggerating). I have no problem with waiting the full the 25 seconds allowed in between points, but when 10 of the seconds are spent ball bouncing, I can lose my focus. I know some of the pros have a routine when returning serve to counter the ridiculous waste of time like Federer twirls his racquet and some others rock side to side. What do you do to deal with OCD ball bouncers?

Would it be wrong of me to turn my back to my opponent for 5 seconds of his ball bouncing to gain focus? (he wouldn't even notice cause he's in a trance with that ball) I would turn around fully concentrated and only about 5 seconds of ball bouncing left.

thug the bunny
10-06-2011, 11:04 AM
I would wait for him to stop, and then call time to tie my shoelace. Actually, I would just stand there with hands on hips and not take your ready position until the very end of his trance.

I have the opposite problem with one guy I play. As soon as you get anywhere near the corner of the court his serve is coming at you. I've had his serves go by while I'm still straightening my strings. Which raises the question: what is the rule on readiness of the serve returner?

Up&comer
10-06-2011, 11:09 AM
what is the rule on readiness of the serve returner?

You play to the pace of the server, but the server cannot serve until the returner is ready.

scotus
10-06-2011, 12:30 PM
I would wait for him to stop, and then call time to tie my shoelace. Actually, I would just stand there with hands on hips and not take your ready position until the very end of his trance.

I have the opposite problem with one guy I play. As soon as you get anywhere near the corner of the court his serve is coming at you. I've had his serves go by while I'm still straightening my strings. Which raises the question: what is the rule on readiness of the serve returner?

Many rec players who "quick-serve" do not know that it is in bad taste. They do this, of course, to gain an advantage.

But most of them that I have confronted have learned to wait for the returner to get ready.

I usually stop their serve the first few times and if they do not get the message, I will have a talk with them. After that, they get the message.

Lawn Tennis
10-06-2011, 12:59 PM
I would wait for him to stop, and then call time to tie my shoelace. Actually, I would just stand there with hands on hips and not take your ready position until the very end of his trance.

I have the opposite problem with one guy I play. As soon as you get anywhere near the corner of the court his serve is coming at you. I've had his serves go by while I'm still straightening my strings. Which raises the question: what is the rule on readiness of the serve returner?

Okay, I will try that. Is it against the rules?

Lol I've seen that before, it's pretty funny. Once it happened in league play and I had to stop the guy.

6-2/6-4/6-0
10-06-2011, 01:15 PM
I am a reasonably quick server. I square up at the baseline and then bounce the ball three times and go into my motion. There is a woman that I play with from time to time who constantly takes a good deal of time just fussing around at the baseline and keeping me from my normal serving pace. I find it bothersome, but try to be reasonably accommodating except between first and second serves and on key points - then I play my pace and if she's goofing off, that's her problem.

Interestingly enough, she plays at a completely unpredictable pace when serving. It seems like every time I'm straightening my strings she wants to play fast, and every time I'm at the baseline and ready I spend 20 seconds waiting for her.

Needless to say, I try to find other partners most of the time - I'm out there to improve my playing and enjoy my time on the court, not play mind games and patty-cake in a match that just doesn't matter.

I've noticed since coming back to the sport that there are a lot of casual players who think that because the pros now resort to all the stupid gamesmanship that they should do the same thing. I think that's absolute bollocks and wish that they'd just stop with the rubbish and play the game...

papa
10-06-2011, 05:30 PM
Well, the server is to wait for the receiver to be ready before they serve. If someone tries to "quick serve" you just catch the ball or let it go - best bet is hold up your hand until your set. Once your set, you cannot become un-set or not ready.

thug the bunny
10-06-2011, 05:49 PM
Well, the server is to wait for the receiver to be ready before they serve. If someone tries to "quick serve" you just catch the ball or let it go - best bet is hold up your hand until your set. Once your set, you cannot become un-set or not ready.


Sorry OP to HJ the thread, but that's what I thouht. If it's wihtin the 25s limit, the returner can call time and control the pace of play. If I did this enough it would drive my 'quick serve' opp out of his mind. Gotta remember that..

thug the bunny
10-06-2011, 05:55 PM
Okay, I will try that. Is it against the rules?

Lol I've seen that before, it's pretty funny. Once it happened in league play and I had to stop the guy.

No, it's not against the rules, you can adopt any posture you want. You can stand on your head if you want. I'm just sayin don't get all tense and ready to hit until he's ready to hit.

Lawn Tennis
10-06-2011, 08:26 PM
No, it's not against the rules, you can adopt any posture you want. You can stand on your head if you want. I'm just sayin don't get all tense and ready to hit until he's ready to hit.

Lol. Ok i'll try that next time. I'll try it in a couple different ways including turning my back to him to regain my focus.

soyelmocano
10-07-2011, 07:00 PM
I'm guilty. I don't take an extremely long time, but I am a bouncer. It is 7 bounces I think. I use it to breathe, relax, and get the weight shifting.
I breathe in for a few bounces. Then breathe out. Finally, breathing in again on the toss up so that I can breathe out as I hit. This is because your muscles work better when you are exhaling. I'm also gently rocking from front to back as I bounce the ball so as to start the serve with the weight back and then go up and forward into the serve.

It isn't OCD if there is logic behind it, right?

Lawn Tennis
10-07-2011, 09:34 PM
I'm guilty. I don't take an extremely long time, but I am a bouncer. It is 7 bounces I think. I use it to breathe, relax, and get the weight shifting.
I breathe in for a few bounces. Then breathe out. Finally, breathing in again on the toss up so that I can breathe out as I hit. This is because your muscles work better when you are exhaling. I'm also gently rocking from front to back as I bounce the ball so as to start the serve with the weight back and then go up and forward into the serve.

It isn't OCD if there is logic behind it, right?

I would have loved just 7 bounces from him. This guy does it as much as Djokovic. I liked how one of the responses suggested stepping away as a batter in baseball does from the plate to regain his focus.

goran_ace
10-08-2011, 12:42 AM
It won't bother you if you don't let it. The problem isn't that your opponent bounces the ball too much as much as it is that it doesn't take much for you to lose focus. Stay relaxed while he is bouncing the ball. You know as long he is bouncing that the ball isn't going to be coming at you. Be patient. Wait for him to start his service motion.

So maybe your opponent now takes enough time for you to turn around. What happens if that interrupts his routine and he has to start over again? What happens if you play someone who bounces the ball long enough to annoy you but not long enough for you to turn around and back again?

Lawn Tennis
10-08-2011, 10:00 AM
It won't bother you if you don't let it. The problem isn't that your opponent bounces the ball too much as much as it is that it doesn't take much for you to lose focus. Stay relaxed while he is bouncing the ball. You know as long he is bouncing that the ball isn't going to be coming at you. Be patient. Wait for him to start his service motion.

So maybe your opponent now takes enough time for you to turn around. What happens if that interrupts his routine and he has to start over again? What happens if you play someone who bounces the ball long enough to annoy you but not long enough for you to turn around and back again?

This was more the answer I was hoping to hear. Of course, I can learn to cope. Is it possible for me to use his practice against him? To gain an insaciable focus on the matter?

Thanks :)

goran_ace
10-08-2011, 12:46 PM
Is it possible for me to use his practice against him? To gain an insaciable focus on the matter?

Hmm not sure how you would really use it against him, other than using that extra time to take a few deep breaths and clear your head. I can see how that pause affects the rhythm of the game and could throw you off if you like to play fast (between points) on your own serve. Maybe you are putting too much pressure on yourself to do something with the return when you have all that time to think about it? Now, this is just me, but I tend to play loose and easy when returning. All I think about is picking a spot and flowing to the ball. If I get the ball I'm looking for a I can jump on it and punish it, but if I don't get that one I'm just looking to keep the ball in front of me and put it on target.

Lawn Tennis
10-08-2011, 01:47 PM
Hmm not sure how you would really use it against him, other than using that extra time to take a few deep breaths and clear your head. I can see how that pause affects the rhythm of the game and could throw you off if you like to play fast (between points) on your own serve. Maybe you are putting too much pressure on yourself to do something with the return when you have all that time to think about it? Now, this is just me, but I tend to play loose and easy when returning. All I think about is picking a spot and flowing to the ball. If I get the ball I'm looking for a I can jump on it and punish it, but if I don't get that one I'm just looking to keep the ball in front of me and put it on target.

Full shoulder turn and ultra focus on the ball: that's the two things I go for when returning serve. His ball bouncing gets my mind running and thinking about everything from what I'm going to eat afterwards, to where I'm going the next day. And then he serves and I react a split second late; I see the ball coming and then think now wait, what am I supposed to do. Lol. It happens again and again. I have dealt with 10 bounces no problem.. it's the 15+ bounces that starts to put me to sleep.