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View Full Version : Hitting video+How do you get better over the winter?


BagelMe
10-10-2011, 05:02 PM
I'm starting to hit the gym more often (its sooo far away!), but what else can I do?

There's a racketball club in my school, but no tennis club. SUCKS! Will that help me at all?

Haven't really been playing that much in college so far. In fact, I'm lucky if I get to play even once a week.

Here's a vid my friend shot today where I was hitting against another friend from highschool.

http://www.youtube.com/user/gregc1992?feature=mhee#p/u/1/BLPEIVFhX3Q
http://www.youtube.com/user/gregc1992?feature=mhee#p/u/2/kfQZ2KpoR3g
http://www.youtube.com/user/gregc1992?feature=mhee#p/u/3/ze4sze6d-9A
http://www.youtube.com/user/gregc1992?feature=mhee#p/u/4/YCuJQ4w-4vo

How can I get better in general?

Up&comer
10-10-2011, 05:17 PM
You don't have any glaring problems.

On your backhand, catch it a little further out in front and extend further out to the target. You look like you pulled off of the one with your arm.

Other than that, looks good.

dozu
10-10-2011, 05:18 PM
why are you not playing for the college team?

BagelMe
10-10-2011, 05:25 PM
why are you not playing for the college team?

Well, I didn't know boy's tryouts were going on the first week school started. Also, I didn't play tennis competetively over the summer.

I don't know if I could have made a D2 team, considering I've only been playing for 4 years.

BagelMe
10-10-2011, 05:28 PM
You don't have any glaring problems.

On your backhand, catch it a little further out in front and extend further out to the target. You look like you pulled off of the one with your arm.

Other than that, looks good.

Good catch. I find it harder to time the backhand, especially since there's no other arm to gauge the ball. :???:

Something I can definitely work on though! Thanks

dozu
10-10-2011, 05:30 PM
Well, I didn't know boy's tryouts were going on the first week school started. Also, I didn't play tennis competetively over the summer.

I don't know if I could have made a D2 team, considering I've only been playing for 4 years.

if you didn't have much competition experience, then 4 years is a bit short... but D2 covers a very wide spectrum.... i think the weakest D2 programs prolly have 4.0 equivalent players.

hescobal
10-10-2011, 05:34 PM
You shouldn't be playing so deep behind the baseline, everything else looks fine

BagelMe
10-10-2011, 05:34 PM
if you didn't have much competition experience, then 4 years is a bit short... but D2 covers a very wide spectrum.... i think the weakest D2 programs prolly have 4.0 equivalent players.


Thats true, but I've seen the guys that are on the team and they're really good. BTW, I go to Bentley University.

Also, I'm pretty good in matches. However, I tend to struggle with returning serves and volleying; some things that are hard to practice while hitting with friends.

LeeD
10-11-2011, 09:14 AM
Why don't you post some 3x5 cards on the school BB and on the tennis courts, the local tennis shops, and the nearby tennis courts that you're a 4-4.5 player looking for practice partners?
If it's bad weather stopping you, you need to post some ads in the indoor courts that you're a decent player looking for winter practice time.
Just don't post that you're a 5.0 or better player, be honest, and make it look like it might be FUN, not only work.

Mikeadelic
10-11-2011, 09:34 AM
Bagel, it's really hard to tell when your clips are so short.

What I can say is this - although your strokes look good generally, I have to wonder how they are as you increase to a 10-shot, 15-shot, 30-shot+ rallies.

Sometimes, apart from pace, it is hard to differentiate between true 4.0 and 4.5 or even 5.0 players, because by the time you get to 4.0, most of your strokes can already look good in a two- or three- shot situation (this is for those 4.0/4.5 players who make tons of UEs, but look really good when they hit in a glancing situation).

It seems to me that, due to a combination of mental concentration, footwork, recovery, and timing, your strokes may start breaking down the longer the point goes on.

Think about it like this:
On the first shot, your swing is perfect. You watch the ball for an extra 10ms, and recover 10ms too slow, but you're still fine for the second shot. Then you watch the ball for another 10ms too long, and recover another 10ms too slow, but your still fine and you get to the third shot. However, as you get to the 10th, 15th, 20th (if at all), your "time debt" catches up to you, and shows up in a bad contact, or a rushed swing, or some other form of mistake. It's a domino effect.

In summary, your strokes may be fine (I can't see from other angles so I can't truly judge them), but there are many, many other areas that may be limiting your development.

TennisCJC
10-11-2011, 10:08 AM
Are there private or public indoor facilities that have USTA teams near your university? Maybe post cards there that you are looking to join a USTA or leauge team.

Do the indoor clubs have singles ladders?

Are there internet leauges like K-Swiss Ultimate Tennis or T2 that operate in your area?

Next best idea is to transfer to a university in the south, or southwest. I live in Georgia and play outside year round. A bit cold in Jan and Feb but I still probably get in about 2-3 days per week on average. I will play outdoors if temperature above 30 degrees and have played leauge matched in the 20s.

If nothing works out for winter tennis in your area, ask your parents to send you to a 1-week adult camp in Florida as a Christmas present - during XMAS break.

As others have stated, your game looks sound - you look like a tennis player. Hard to tell if 4.0 or 5.0 but good potential.

BagelMe
10-11-2011, 09:13 PM
Bagel, it's really hard to tell when your clips are so short.

What I can say is this - although your strokes look good generally, I have to wonder how they are as you increase to a 10-shot, 15-shot, 30-shot+ rallies.

Sometimes, apart from pace, it is hard to differentiate between true 4.0 and 4.5 or even 5.0 players, because by the time you get to 4.0, most of your strokes can already look good in a two- or three- shot situation (this is for those 4.0/4.5 players who make tons of UEs, but look really good when they hit in a glancing situation).

It seems to me that, due to a combination of mental concentration, footwork, recovery, and timing, your strokes may start breaking down the longer the point goes on.

Think about it like this:
On the first shot, your swing is perfect. You watch the ball for an extra 10ms, and recover 10ms too slow, but you're still fine for the second shot. Then you watch the ball for another 10ms too long, and recover another 10ms too slow, but your still fine and you get to the third shot. However, as you get to the 10th, 15th, 20th (if at all), your "time debt" catches up to you, and shows up in a bad contact, or a rushed swing, or some other form of mistake. It's a domino effect.

In summary, your strokes may be fine (I can't see from other angles so I can't truly judge them), but there are many, many other areas that may be limiting your development.

I try to watch the ball longer, kind of like Federer. It really boosts my consistency and spin.

After watching my videos though, I can see what you're saying though. Don't exactly know how I can work on this

BagelMe
10-11-2011, 09:16 PM
Are there private or public indoor facilities that have USTA teams near your university? Maybe post cards there that you are looking to join a USTA or leauge team.

Do the indoor clubs have singles ladders?

Are there internet leauges like K-Swiss Ultimate Tennis or T2 that operate in your area?

Next best idea is to transfer to a university in the south, or southwest. I live in Georgia and play outside year round. A bit cold in Jan and Feb but I still probably get in about 2-3 days per week on average. I will play outdoors if temperature above 30 degrees and have played leauge matched in the 20s.

If nothing works out for winter tennis in your area, ask your parents to send you to a 1-week adult camp in Florida as a Christmas present - during XMAS break.

As others have stated, your game looks sound - you look like a tennis player. Hard to tell if 4.0 or 5.0 but good potential.

I would need a car to get to the closest indoor tenis court, but I'll look into the other options.

Honestly I'm thinking about transferring, even though I'm only 5 weeks into my freshman year...lol. I tried to not let tennis be a factor in my college decision, but I deeply regret this. I'll have to look into realistic schools I can transfer to that have a strong business program.

Thanks.

tennis_balla
10-12-2011, 02:21 AM
Both of you need to get more then 4 balls over the net. I saw the first two videos you posted, video 3 and 4, and the longest rally I counted was 4 balls. Get your consistency up, you guys were both all over the map. Its great to hit winners but if you're missing easy shots into the net or long its useless.

Mikeadelic
10-12-2011, 05:34 AM
I try to watch the ball longer, kind of like Federer. It really boosts my consistency and spin.

After watching my videos though, I can see what you're saying though. Don't exactly know how I can work on this

To clear things up, I wasn't talking about watching the ball longer at contact. That is always a good thing to do and I usually hammer that into my students. I meant that, after you hit the ball and it goes to your opponent, you spend an extra 10ms to see where your ball lands instead of focusing on your point of recovery after the ball leaves your stringbed.

You gotta develop a quick mental rhythm to boost your consistency. Something like: hit-recover-split step-hit-recover-split step... not hit-watch ball land-move-watch ball come back-move-split step etc etc

BagelMe
10-12-2011, 06:27 AM
Both of you need to get more then 4 balls over the net. I saw the first two videos you posted, video 3 and 4, and the longest rally I counted was 4 balls. Get your consistency up, you guys were both all over the map. Its great to hit winners but if you're missing easy shots into the net or long its useless.

My partner wasn't hitting hard, so I was going for more aggressive shots. If I ever get to play I'll try to put my iphone up and record it.

Apparently my backhand in vid 4 was in :D But the shot where I hit the ball into the net at the end in vid 3, I was way too far behind the baseline, like one of the other posters mentioned.

Also, its funny how I rarely get into a 10+ ball rally unless I'm hitting with someone better than me, where I try to put more focus on placing the ball. My usual hitting partners, who I've been playing with since I started tennis, tend to hit the ball very hard and consistently, so I guess they've rubbed off on me a bit.

BagelMe
10-12-2011, 06:29 AM
To clear things up, I wasn't talking about watching the ball longer at contact. That is always a good thing to do and I usually hammer that into my students. I meant that, after you hit the ball and it goes to your opponent, you spend an extra 10ms to see where your ball lands instead of focusing on your point of recovery after the ball leaves your stringbed.

You gotta develop a quick mental rhythm to boost your consistency. Something like: hit-recover-split step-hit-recover-split step... not hit-watch ball land-move-watch ball come back-move-split step etc etc

:) MAkes sense now

tennis_balla
10-12-2011, 06:35 AM
My partner wasn't hitting hard, so I was going for more aggressive shots. If I ever get to play I'll try to put my iphone up and record it.

Apparently my backhand in vid 4 was in :D But the shot where I hit the ball into the net at the end in vid 3, I was way too far behind the baseline, like one of the other posters mentioned.

Also, its funny how I rarely get into a 10+ ball rally unless I'm hitting with someone better than me, where I try to put more focus on placing the ball. My usual hitting partners, who I've been playing with since I started tennis, tend to hit the ball very hard and consistently, so I guess they've rubbed off on me a bit.

You guys were just hitting correct, and not playing points? Didn't look like you were playing points from what I remember. If so, hitting winners and going for your shots is useless. Get some 15-20 shot rallies going, working on your timing, rhythm, footwork etc. Doesn't matter if your partner wasn't hitting hard or is weaker. That has nothing to do with it. Its about training properly and to be honest you guys are just wasting your time on the court right now with the way you're playing/training.

I might sound harsh but thats the way it is. If you wanna move up and get better then you better start practicing like it cause from what I've seen if you called me to hit I'd decline.

BagelMe
10-12-2011, 07:11 AM
You guys were just hitting correct, and not playing points? Didn't look like you were playing points from what I remember. If so, hitting winners and going for your shots is useless. Get some 15-20 shot rallies going, working on your timing, rhythm, footwork etc. Doesn't matter if your partner wasn't hitting hard or is weaker. That has nothing to do with it. Its about training properly and to be honest you guys are just wasting your time on the court right now with the way you're playing/training.

I might sound harsh but thats the way it is. If you wanna move up and get better then you better start practicing like it cause from what I've seen if you called me to hit I'd decline.

I don't take this personally, but I do understand what you're saying and appreciate your advice.

I'll try it out next time I get time on the court.

tennis_balla
10-12-2011, 07:18 AM
I don't take this personally, but I do understand what you're saying and appreciate your advice.

I'll try it out next time I get time on the court.

Its not personal at all, its just what I see and comment on it from experience. Like I said it might sound harsh but I'm trying to be direct and as honest with you as I can. I commented on your video not to put you down but to try an help you out. I think you have a lot of good things going on in your game but it all looks undisciplined when you're training. Mind you, this is normal but when you see good players practice theres always a purpose to everything they do.

The fact that you've only been playing for 4 years is great and your game is coming along nicely. A good way to improve would be to find some group lessons or an academy with other players your age. There you'll get drills as well as match play.