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JamieSafe
10-12-2011, 01:04 PM
Anyone have some tips on how to master this? I'm talking pro grade stuff here aka Federer starting high and going lower and lower bouncing it with the speed of light at some point.

I can do a lot of tricks in tennis (because I used to play soccer) but for the life of me I can't get this one right. It never ever bounces the way I like when it comes to the speed. I feel that doing this right will help me concentrate better on the serve and create some consistency but I just can't do it with the current practice methods. Is it just me, or is this really something difficult? I do have to note my left hand is much and much less used in daily life so maybe it's that. I can bounce it like a basketball but only for 2 or 3 shots, and I can bounce it while grabbing it but that goes too slow. I feel that the pros do a combination of this only slightly catching it but still letting it bounce against the hand instead of fully grabbing it. Or maybe I'm wrong and they fully catch it and are just that fast.

So any ideas? :-|

LeeD
10-12-2011, 01:14 PM
1. You play soccer, no need for hands.
2. Practice lots. Some pros almost dribble the tennis ball.
3. Look more to DJ than Fed.
4. If you want to progressively shorten and quicken the bounce, just bend over more as you bounce more.
5. Yes, it helps to be ambidextrious, play baseball fielding with both hands (had both mitts), and catch and throw with both hands.

spacediver
10-12-2011, 01:21 PM
heh i'm debating whether to learn how to do this also. Currently I bounce the ball with the racquet a few times before serving. But this means I have to switch grips, as it's hard to bounce with a conti grip.

LeeD
10-12-2011, 01:26 PM
As kids in grammar school, we always played basetball with tennis balls, as that 10' basket is just well beyond reach of anyone under the age of 11.
When you do a crossover with a tennis ball, it becomes second nature to use both hands and cup it lightly, carry it, palm it, and otherwise showboat like the NBA heros.
And in basketball, you always need the skils to dribble with both hands, or the defender just cheats that side, taking away your drive to the basket.

JamieSafe
10-12-2011, 02:09 PM
Yeah, now that I think about it, I'm sure my right hand bounces a tennis ball better even though I have never tried it before in a match.

heh i'm debating whether to learn how to do this also. Currently I bounce the ball with the racquet a few times before serving. But this means I have to switch grips, as it's hard to bounce with a conti grip.Yeah I do this as well, it helps with concentrating but bouncing that ball will help that much more getting it in the air in a straight line.

3. Look more to DJ than Fed.
Qué?

LeeD
10-12-2011, 02:57 PM
What?
Notice DJ bounces the ball more than 10 times before important points, and he does nothing fancy with the ball!
YOU...don't do anything fancy, just bounce it exactly the same spot every time.

JamieSafe
10-12-2011, 03:50 PM
What?
Notice DJ bounces the ball more than 10 times before important points, and he does nothing fancy with the ball!
YOU...don't do anything fancy, just bounce it exactly the same spot every time.Ohh, Djokovic. I thought you meant some kind of DJ spin move, hence the que :p

thug the bunny
10-12-2011, 05:34 PM
As silly as it sounds, I agree that a good bounce sets the focus for the serve. I use the bounce to get used to really seeiing the ball, as I have a tendency to pull my head off when I try to hit it hard.

I do a half-catch where you just kind of cup it but don't grab, and then release it back down. I usually do 4, unless I know my concentration isn't right, then I start over.

edit - or you could just bounce it with the edge of your racquet, that will really set your focus:)

LeeD
10-12-2011, 05:38 PM
Most people call that a dribble, like in basketball, you catch the ball on it's way UP, follow it up a bit, then push gently down surrounding the ball with the palm of your hands. You can go onto "carry" the ball by going horizontal, or flirt with the call by adding a vertical downward component to your carry.