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TennisBeginner
10-12-2011, 02:32 PM
Hey Talk Tennis Members, I have a bit of a problem when playing pushers, no matter what I do I can't beat them. I'm in high school and ranked in the top 5 going into this year, but the people above me are pushers who I just cant beat.

Also my second problem is that I hit a lot of balls long. They have topspin on them, and when they go in they are great, but that's just the problem, I cant keep them in. Will it come with practice or am I doing something wrong?

All help will be appreciated, thanks a bunch.

LeeD
10-12-2011, 02:55 PM
Practice.
As a less than 4 year tennis player, you are a relative beginner to the sport of tennis.
Practice, hit the ball nearer the sidelines, use the short angles to play your topspin shots shorter than the service line, but CC on the sidelines, making the pushers run.
Use some variety. Drop shot them, bringing them to net, then you may toy with them with CC lobs or topspin lobs, hard shots into their hip pocket, or low dipping first pass attempts, followed by a stronger shot next.
One thing about getting old is that you have accumulated lots of experience, while your body declines.
Your body is still getting stronger, so you mind is empty of strategy and ideas.

yonexpurestorm
10-12-2011, 03:05 PM
ive come to the conclusion that to beat pushers you must construct points. hitting winners will consist of hitting 3 thought out strategicaly placed shots. against pushers you cannot just go for winners. you will need to get them deep cross court then take the next short ball and hit behind them while theyre running, and then either take the net and finish, or take the next short ball and finish in the open court. against pushers that run everything down you never try winner from behind the baseline. they want you to try this and make errors. that is their game. you must hit with them and construct the points to place yourself in a position to hit a high percentage winning shot. they rely on errors and you cannot give them any errors. also know that your shots dont need to be perfect unless they can counter punch real well. if they are a true pusher they will not be able to punish your short balls. the only way to win is to stay consistent and only go for put aways that you know you will most likely not make an error on.

thug the bunny
10-12-2011, 05:47 PM
Totally agree yonex. When I lose to a pusher it is invariably because I play impatiently. I get too agressive off of deep baseline floaters, and I try to put it away on the first service line sitter. But when I stay patient and use some variety as Lee mentioned, I will always arrive at a ball I know I can put away.

TennisBeginner
10-12-2011, 05:57 PM
Alright next time I play them I'll try to be as patient as possible, which may be tough for me, but hopefully it will lead me to victory! Thanks for the answers mates

Tennis_Monk
10-12-2011, 06:26 PM
Hey Talk Tennis Members, I have a bit of a problem when playing pushers, no matter what I do I can't beat them. I'm in high school and ranked in the top 5 going into this year, but the people above me are pushers who I just cant beat.

Also my second problem is that I hit a lot of balls long. They have topspin on them, and when they go in they are great, but that's just the problem, I cant keep them in. Will it come with practice or am I doing something wrong?

All help will be appreciated, thanks a bunch.

Pushers are a boon in helping your tennis game to next level. They will give you oppurtunity to hone in on your shots and they dont have too many options to hurt from an offense perspective.

First improve your fitness a lot. be prepared to hit an extra shot several times. Most Pushers will feel a bit insecure once they realize that their opponent can stay with them as long as needed.

See if you can exploit the weakness of Pushers. generally most pushers struggle when they have to hit high backhands (especially the one handed ones). You can hit good topspin (not neccessarily too fast or etc) groundies to their backhand and then pin them to that corner. Then at the earliest oppurtunity try to hit an aggressive forehand into the other corner. You can also switch the patten and play cross court until you suddenly go DTL. Patience is the key here. Unless there is big difference in levels (eg 4.5 vs 3.5) , there will be long rallies and one has to wait patiently for the right ball to go for winner.

That said, if you can hit your strokes deep into the court, that should always be the key. The deeper your shots are, the more difficult it will be for Pushers.

Similarly check their return of serves. If they have trouble picking your serve on certain side (ie wide or DTL or into body) then give a lot more of what they dont like.

mikeler
10-13-2011, 04:51 AM
Go to net. Repeat this often. If your volleys and/or overhead suck, this is a good time to practice those shots.

fuzz nation
10-13-2011, 05:29 AM
Go to net. Repeat this often. If your volleys and/or overhead suck, this is a good time to practice those shots.

Beat me to it.

Pushers are human backboards who break down the resolve of many opponents. They often depend on their retrieving skills so that no matter what you do, the darn ball keeps coming back. Many players will only decide to counter that tactic either by trying to play as consistently as possible or by trying more low percentage miracle shots.

Well the option of going for low percentage shots is obviously a bad bet; you're gonna miss a lot of those and donate a bunch of points. Trying to be more consistent than an opponent who uses consistency as a primary tactic is usually playing into the hands of a pusher, too. That's only useful if you can construct some points where you create openings to hit through. That's not too easy against pushers.

The most important thing when facing this sort of hitter can be simply recognizing the dreaded pusher and understanding that your best weapon against this sort of player is patience. If a pusher gets you frustrated, you're toast.

Since these sorts of players don't hit with much pace, that means that they don't have such formidable passing shots that they can scoot by you at will. If you can transition forward behind approaches placed nice and deep, it's likely that the ball will come back, but it's also likely that a pusher won't gun you down with a laser-bomb. There are always bigger angles to work with up at the net than back at the baseline, so that's where you can likely hit the ball through open space and give the dreaded pushers more than their legs can handle.

If you're not a competent net rusher, get to work. Not only will you need those skills for your eventual endeavors as a doubles player, but net-crashing is also a solid "plan B" to use against players that you simply can't out-slug from your own baseline.

luishcorreia
10-13-2011, 06:52 AM
all you need to know about beating a pusher.

http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com/2011/07/how-to-beat-pusher.html

:)
Hope it helps