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Mansewerz
10-18-2011, 03:53 PM
I posted some videos earlier, and they were asking how to get more pace. Many mentioned I wasn't following through, I was shackled in my forehands. What's going wrong in this clip here? I know something is wrong, but I can't put my finger on it.

I still feel as if I have a lack of power, and when I go for forehands, they're sailing, or i'm shanking like no other. Other times, when I go for a medium paced rally ball, my shot is shot, or often times, I feel as if only my wrist is coming over the ball. Any alternative "cues" to get in my head to fix this. Also, this is against a wall.




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1HyIb5yXt8

(Ignore the backhand right now, I'm in an experimental phase with it).

dozu
10-18-2011, 04:01 PM
go to L&R's home page and do his drill...

basically you don't have enough unit turn... 90 degrees there about... pros have 180... what happens then is the arm/hand is just dying to take over, then it crashes into the chest, palm flips shut, no depth control.

the L&R drill should get you there.

also, the graphite-centric swing thought always give you a late start while you try to swing the arm/racket unit....

time the elbow, not the racket.

Mansewerz
10-18-2011, 04:10 PM
L&R? Also, is there something I should be doing different on that follow through? THe crash into chest, palm flips shut sounds like it shouldn't be what I should be doing.

dozu
10-18-2011, 04:17 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Wwg9DB8S8a8

LeeD
10-18-2011, 06:14 PM
Looks to me like you still have a short, compact swing, which I wish I can find.
With such a short swing, you need to swing violently, like JimCourier, to get some power. Maybe trade off some topspin to gain a flatter faster ball? Such a short quick swing is great for control, and great for handling fast incoming balls.
Maybe better to keep your current swing, prep earlier and swing a hair slower for your RALLY shots, then really flatten out your swing for the forcing or winner attempts.

rkelley
10-18-2011, 11:27 PM
I posted some videos earlier, and they were asking how to get more pace. Many mentioned I wasn't following through, I was shackled in my forehands. What's going wrong in this clip here? I know something is wrong, but I can't put my finger on it.

I still feel as if I have a lack of power, and when I go for forehands, they're sailing, or i'm shanking like no other. Other times, when I go for a medium paced rally ball, my shot is shot, or often times, I feel as if only my wrist is coming over the ball. Any alternative "cues" to get in my head to fix this. Also, this is against a wall.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1HyIb5yXt8

(Ignore the backhand right now, I'm in an experimental phase with it).

A couple of things I see:


Your elbow is pinned to your side during your forward swing. You want some space between that elbow and your side. You're essentially pinning your upper arm and removing it from the stroke.
I agree a bit more unit turn would help. I would not think about turning more though. 90 is about what you should be shooting for and you're basically getting there. Instead of intentionally turning more, use that left arm and really stretch it out across your body parallel to the baseline. That will help turn your shoulders just a bit more. Regarding Dozu's comment about a 180, I don't recall ever seeing that and I guess I don't see how that's possible. However when you really reach with that left arm you do show a bit of your left shoulder blade to your opponent.
Use your legs more.


Definitely check out the Lock in Roll tennis video on the forehand: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMNtq393tvo&feature=related

I'd also say practice these things at a slower pace and energy. You should feel lots of free, effortless power. Then, when you want to murder the ball, crank it up like Lee describes. Parts of your swing will probably break down when you do this. Figure out what it was, go back and practice slow, then crank it up again. Eventually you should be able to maintain from even at the higher pace, and that's when you really start getting that great power.

MarinaHighTennis
10-19-2011, 12:19 AM
I should be studying right now but I'll help you out (1am)

When you hit against a wall focus on:
1) rhythm & rally (dont kill the wall, hes your hitting partner)
2) relaxation (make your strokes flow as in fluidity)
like this (berdych is relaxed and fluid):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cebdc0XvTys
3) stay in one spot (3feet area) and try to rally from there (hit the ball in the same place and get a rhythm)
4) step in, step back (in when you hit, back in recovery, repeat...)

Tennis is repetition, as well as art. Think of yourself as a ballet dancer. Don't force, flow.

Mansewerz
10-19-2011, 09:20 AM
A couple of things I see:


Your elbow is pinned to your side during your forward swing. You want some space between that elbow and your side. You're essentially pinning your upper arm and removing it from the stroke.
I agree a bit more unit turn would help. I would not think about turning more though. 90 is about what you should be shooting for and you're basically getting there. Instead of intentionally turning more, use that left arm and really stretch it out across your body parallel to the baseline. That will help turn your shoulders just a bit more. Regarding Dozu's comment about a 180, I don't recall ever seeing that and I guess I don't see how that's possible. However when you really reach with that left arm you do show a bit of your left shoulder blade to your opponent.
Use your legs more.


Definitely check out the Lock in Roll tennis video on the forehand: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMNtq393tvo&feature=related

I'd also say practice these things at a slower pace and energy. You should feel lots of free, effortless power. Then, when you want to murder the ball, crank it up like Lee describes. Parts of your swing will probably break down when you do this. Figure out what it was, go back and practice slow, then crank it up again. Eventually you should be able to maintain from even at the higher pace, and that's when you really start getting that great power.

I see. Will leading with the elbow, in a way, help me unshackle my arm from the body?

5263
10-19-2011, 09:58 AM
good example of how the side stance is not as good for power.
Your core spring is not loaded when your racket is brought back and you
decel near contact instead of accel . It costs you power and control.
I think overall your swing is looking pretty good otherwise.

Mansewerz
10-19-2011, 12:43 PM
So load the core and accelerate?

LeeD
10-19-2011, 02:12 PM
I think you're trying to beat a dead horse.
Your current compact swing is GREAT for returning fast incoming balls and giving you direction, control, and consistency.
You need to learn a longer, faster swing, coupled with a flatter ball, for more pace, if you have the time.
You MIGHT also need a rally ball, something spinny and high net clearance, so you can rally and stay in points when the opponent doesn't miss, and you don't want to turn it on.

SWEDISH_PERSSON
10-19-2011, 03:57 PM
If you look at the pros when they hit youll see them hit the ball pretty weird sometimes. My trainer explained this to me, when they hit it they sort of whip their racquet around to get more acceleration on the head. He compared it to how you swing a hammer you dont move your hand, you move the head of the hammer and your hand stays in relatively the same spot. this really helped my forehand, along with getting my momentum forward.

Limpinhitter
10-19-2011, 05:59 PM
I posted some videos earlier, and they were asking how to get more pace. Many mentioned I wasn't following through, I was shackled in my forehands. What's going wrong in this clip here? I know something is wrong, but I can't put my finger on it.

I still feel as if I have a lack of power, and when I go for forehands, they're sailing, or i'm shanking like no other. Other times, when I go for a medium paced rally ball, my shot is shot, or often times, I feel as if only my wrist is coming over the ball. Any alternative "cues" to get in my head to fix this. Also, this is against a wall.




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1HyIb5yXt8

(Ignore the backhand right now, I'm in an experimental phase with it).

The problem isn't so much your strokes or form, it's your footwork and set up (your shot preparation). You are not consistently getting into optimum position to hit the ball. Your set up is late, especially on the forehand side, and you are setting up indiscriminately with closed and open stances on the forehand. As a result, you are off balance, and you are either cramped or reaching, or hitting early or late, all in an attempt to compensate for a poor set up. Think of yourself as a batter in the batters box, set up and loaded up - before the ball gets there.

Next time, forget about your strokes and just focus on your footwork and set up and see what happens.

rkelley
10-19-2011, 07:49 PM
I see. Will leading with the elbow, in a way, help me unshackle my arm from the body?

I don't think of leading with the elbow. I really like what the Lock in Roll guy has to say about turning your hips and shoulders and then as a natural reaction to that the racquet lays back. That position where the racquet lays back and then whips forward into the ball is where a bunch of power lives.

You're getting a lot of advice. Some of it conflicting. I'd really emphasize going to some of those good websites like Lock in Roll and fuzzyyellowballs, and watching some youtube videos of pros. Go practice your stroke in the mirror. Do you look like the pros? If not then fix it. It's a first step,

Your stroke isn't too bad, but I do think that there are improvements that you can make to get the power that you want with more consistency.

Good luck.

rufusbgood
10-19-2011, 08:44 PM
Lot's of really great advice here. Now for something completely different.

Here's a thought that I imagine will be totally useless to you but I can't resist.

The secret to hitting the ball hard lies in learning how to take pace off the ball. Think about it. On the surface it sounds ridiculous I know, but I'm not trying to be enigmatic here, I'm totally serious. If you know how to take pace off the ball you know how to control the ball. And if you know how to control the ball you can hit it as hard as you want. Taking pace off the ball requires that you know how to hold the ball on the strings. And when you know how to hold the ball on the strings you are stroking the ball. Otherwise you are batting the ball.

[/sermon]

toly
10-20-2011, 05:46 AM
Taking pace off the ball requires that you know how to hold the ball on the strings. And when you know how to hold the ball on the strings you are stroking the ball. Otherwise you are batting the ball.

[/sermon]
Great idea, but how you can implement it in practice?

rufusbgood
10-20-2011, 08:58 AM
Great idea, but how you can implement it in practice?

Practice hitting slow. Practice hitting under control. Practice hitting at a sustainable pace. Practice hitting the same ball over and over, the same way.

The problem with practicing hitting the ball hard is the thing you end up practicing is making mistakes.

dozu
10-20-2011, 09:42 AM
Practice hitting slow. Practice hitting under control. Practice hitting at a sustainable pace. Practice hitting the same ball over and over, the same way.

The problem with practicing hitting the ball hard is the thing you end up practicing is making mistakes.

this is an excellent idea.... very similarly in golf, one very good drill is try to hit a 7 iron 100 yards, or a driver 150 yards.... you can only do this with smooth tempo, without any manipulation from small muscles.

ThoughtCrime
10-22-2011, 06:46 PM
Oh, a good drill for controlled hitting is to only use half of the court, adding rules like only cross court or only DTL etc. starting at the service line and gradually moving towards the base line, it teaches you control and consistency.

If you have gotten good at this you can try to only use the doubles alley with your partner, it's great for control and placement.