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View Full Version : how to grip the racket with one handed backhand


blauwalkuh
10-23-2011, 09:36 AM
hi

this is not a question what kind of grip to use.
this is a question on how to hold the racket in your hand.

i m not sure about something and want to explain u my question by showing to kinds of holding it.

first:

racket is turned to your body and racket head to the opposite.
of course the beam is turned to the top and the bottom.
so if i would grip the eastern grip here my hand would be spread over the whole racket.

second:

racket head is showing to the left and grip to the right ( if you are right hander ).
beam again top and bottom.
if i now grip the racket the knuckle of the index and little finger are located on the top bevel so all fingers are moved together.

thinking about it by writing i think the first version is the right one because heel of hand is not on the top bevel using the second method.
but it should be there right ?

please help

sepidoel
10-23-2011, 11:31 AM
I'm not sure if I fully understand your question. Perhaps this link can answer your question: http://www.ultimatehandbook.com/uh/training_backhand.html

Ash_Smith
10-23-2011, 11:42 AM
Photo's maybe?

cheers

blauwalkuh
10-23-2011, 01:58 PM
hey thanks for the link and the answers i think it could help me :D

blauwalkuh
10-23-2011, 02:00 PM
yes i think you can compare it to the pictures of the link.

the first thing i tried to explain was something like the split fingers and the second one like the power grip.

so are both grips used in different situations or is only one the better one ?

thanks

Fuji
10-23-2011, 09:29 PM
I usually almost exclusivity a mix between split fingers / trigger finger on all my shots. I was taught that you should never been using the "power grip" or what I was taught as the "hammer grip". :)

-Fuji

blauwalkuh
10-24-2011, 02:17 AM
ok nice to know thanks for the answer

fuzz nation
10-24-2011, 05:44 AM
I've had a tricky time figuring out exactly what I like in my one-handed backhand grip, but I've found that a lot of the "voodoo" involved with quickly setting my gripping hand for that stroke is dependent on what I do with my off-hand, which holds the racquet up on the throat as I take my back-swing. If that off-hand holds the racquet at the proper angle, my gripping hand just naturally falls into place with the right orientation to swing away.

I mention this just because I use a few different racquets which come with their own grip shapes, so feeling out their bevels can get "interesting" on that backhand wing. Once I changed my focus on using my off-hand to correctly set the racquet, it became night-and-day more easy for me to get the right grip, regardless of the different feel of the bevels on those different racquets.

Mountain Ghost
10-24-2011, 09:43 AM
This is ABSOLUTELY the key!!!

If your off-hand positions the racquet at the proper angle, the loosely gripped hitting hand automatically goes to the correct grip. You can practice this off-court ... even while watching TV.

MG

goober
10-24-2011, 11:07 AM
I usually almost exclusivity a mix between split fingers / trigger finger on all my shots. I was taught that you should never been using the "power grip" or what I was taught as the "hammer grip". :)

-Fuji

What was the reasoning? I use a hammer grip on my 1HBH, I have tried pistol/trigger grip but it felt less stable.

blauwalkuh
10-24-2011, 11:26 AM
thanks for the answers

Fuji
10-27-2011, 05:49 PM
What was the reasoning? I use a hammer grip on my 1HBH, I have tried pistol/trigger grip but it felt less stable.

To be honest, I was taught this way because it has less stability then a fanned grip. It is more then likely just me, but the way I learned to serve was with a pistol grip, and so that when I go out of my serve straight to my backhand, it's literally no transition. (I hit with a Continental on both!) It's more an ease of use then anything, but I remember when I was younger that you should never grip in a hammer grip because you aren't "hammering" anything. Probably just an odd way of explaining it, and to me a hammer feels very unstable. It's also because I was taught drop shots and slice at a very early part in my game, trying to caress touch shots with a closed hand is very difficult for me. :) Sorry if I didn't answer your question, I tried my best!

-Fuji

Xizel
10-27-2011, 07:24 PM
I hit with a Continental on both

That's why. Continental works better pistol-style. Eastern backhand is different. I never got the stability part. You're hitting a groundstroke, not a volley. Furthermore, if you're consistently hitting the sweet spot, the ball impact force is minimal. The thing with volleying is that even if you don't hit the sweet spot, at least the twistweight will make a decent off-center shot. If you're lacking stability, you probably could use a heavier frame. Hitting 1HBH with a light frame is a world of frame twisting.

Fuji
10-27-2011, 07:57 PM
That's why. Continental works better pistol-style. Eastern backhand is different. I never got the stability part. You're hitting a groundstroke, not a volley. Furthermore, if you're consistently hitting the sweet spot, the ball impact force is minimal. The thing with volleying is that even if you don't hit the sweet spot, at least the twistweight will make a decent off-center shot. If you're lacking stability, you probably could use a heavier frame. Hitting 1HBH with a light frame is a world of frame twisting.

Makes sense! I've dabbled a bit in Eastern Backhand, but I just can't get it down. I much prefer my continental! :)

Good point. Stability is really a huge part of the frame. I know when I'm playing with my 14.0oz PSC6.1, it doesn't matter how I hold the racket, for as long as it touches the ball, I don't have any problem with twisting. Heck, I even framed a few backhands that were crushed back without much difference in feel in my frame LOL!

-Fuji

blauwalkuh
10-29-2011, 04:31 AM
thanks for the answers