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Chyeaah
01-10-2012, 01:06 AM
I've been doing some research on hybrids and stuff, and people always tell me to string the synth gut cross higher on the wilson racquet and the same as the mains on the Yonex racquet, is this because the shape of the racquet is different and if i string higher on the crosses it will collapse.

And also when i open the trapdoor thing on my Pro Open how am i meant to put weights in it? It doesnt have the 2 holes like the APD

And do more headlight racquets swing faster?

Chyeaah
01-11-2012, 02:27 PM
bump. My searches are getting mixed results some saying it will buckle, some saying it wont.

li0scc0
01-11-2012, 02:33 PM
I strung my Yonex racquets with higher tension on the crosses without issue.

Not sure what you mean about the Trapdoor?

Timbo's hopeless slice
01-11-2012, 03:12 PM
he means the butt cap, I think.

julian
01-11-2012, 03:44 PM
I've been doing some research on hybrids and stuff, and people always tell me to string the synth gut cross higher on the wilson racquet and the same as the mains on the Yonex racquet, is this because the shape of the racquet is different and if i string higher on the crosses it will collapse.

And also when i open the trapdoor thing on my Pro Open how am i meant to put weights in it? It doesnt have the 2 holes like the APD

And do more headlight racquets swing faster?
1.Could you provide a source of your first sentence about Yonex rackets?
2.I would suggest to ask mikeler or put a post in the string section
3.The very smart poster of the name corners could help you with your last question

Bartelby
01-11-2012, 03:51 PM
The advice used to be to string crosses on the Yonex lower than the mains, but this is no longer current so you can do what you like.

The less stiff string usually gets the higher tension so that's probably the syth gut in your Wilson.

Chyeaah
01-11-2012, 04:37 PM
1.Could you provide a source of your first sentence about Yonex rackets?
2.I would suggest to ask mikeler or put a post in the string section
3.The very smart poster of the name corners could help you with your last question

Which one? the cross being same tension as the poly mains on the yonex? or that it will collapse?

I was thinking that it will collapse because yonex recommends 5% lower on the crosses and if i string it 5-10% higher it will be bad for the frame.

julian
01-11-2012, 06:00 PM
Which one? the cross being same tension as the poly mains on the yonex? or that it will collapse?

I was thinking that it will collapse because yonex recommends 5% lower on the crosses and if i string it 5-10% higher it will be bad for the frame.
Please provide source of opinions for both questions

julian
01-11-2012, 06:23 PM
I've been doing some research on hybrids and stuff, and people always tell me to string the synth gut cross higher on the wilson racquet and the same as the mains on the Yonex racquet, is this because the shape of the racquet is different and if i string higher on the crosses it will collapse.

And also when i open the trapdoor thing on my Pro Open how am i meant to put weights in it? It doesnt have the 2 holes like the APD

And do more headlight racquets swing faster?
Pl post your last question in the instruction section

Chyeaah
01-11-2012, 06:53 PM
Please provide source of opinions for both questions

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=352630

And stringing syngut crosses higher than poly mains is a given since the syn gut is less stiff.

Timbo's hopeless slice
01-11-2012, 07:42 PM
Pl post your last question in the instruction section

pl stop being a tosser and help the kid out...

li0scc0
01-12-2012, 06:20 AM
he means the butt cap, I think.

:) I know that, just wondering what his question is about the trapdoor.

rdis10093
01-12-2012, 06:41 AM
bh knows alot about yonex, and he allways said to string -2 in the crosses

Overeemforehand-YYR-23
01-12-2012, 06:41 AM
I found something for you guys:

The Isometric Square Head Shape reduces the inert space found in a conventional round frame resulting in superior maneuverability and a 10% bigger sweetspot when compared to an ordinary racquet. The sweetspot is the area of a racquet where the longest main and longest cross strings meet in the stringbed. In an ordinary round frame racquet, the sweetspot is where the 8 main and 11 cross strings meet. In the Yonex Isometric Square Head racquet, 10 main and 13 cross strings meet. With more strings of equal length and a larger effective hitting area in the stringbed, the Isometric Square Head Shape provides consistently accurate shots, more power, control and more effective off-center hits.

Now as far as tension goes, it would make more sense to lower the tension 2,3,4 Lbs on crosses so you can have a bigger and larger sweet spot, meaning more forgiving, more spin, power... In my case in my RDiS 200's I use 3 Lbs lower tension for crosses and 1 piece stringing(Yonex does not recommend that) but that is how my stringer did his and is doing mine.

rdis10093
01-12-2012, 06:45 AM
all yonex racquets I think are recommend to be done with 2 piece.

Overeemforehand-YYR-23
01-12-2012, 07:18 AM
all yonex racquets I think are recommend to be done with 2 piece.

That is correct. That is how I like my frames strung, unless it is hybrid.

julian
01-12-2012, 10:07 AM
pl stop being a tosser and help the kid out...
You are missing the point
i do NOT know a well justified answer to his very good question

Mazilla2219
01-12-2012, 11:10 AM
Stringing the x's higher than the m's is fine just don't go crazy, but as it has been stated prior doing so will decrease the sweetspot size compared to stringing the x's lower than the m's

I owned several Yonex frames throughout the years and have never seen one with a trap door

shogun90
01-12-2012, 11:56 AM
Stringing the x's higher than the m's is fine just don't go crazy, but as it has been stated prior doing so will decrease the sweetspot size compared to stringing the x's lower than the m's

I owned several Yonex frames throughout the years and have never seen one with a trap door

The trap door the OP is referring to is for the Pro Open.

Since i use a hybrid of poly mains and multi crosses, I had the crosses strung the same tension as the mains because I figured the multis would eventually stretch more than the polys and end up looser.

tennis_balla
01-12-2012, 01:09 PM
I've had Yonex rackets since 2006 (though just recently switched) and always strung the crosses 2 pounds tighter and never had a problem, but then again I always string or get my rackets strung on a 6-point machine and from someone who knows what they are doing. I have heard the 2 pounds less rule on crosses and not just for Yonex. A lot of pro string their crosses 1kg less, for example 25/24. I do know that Kuerten used to string his crosses tighter by 2 pounds, I believe his tension was 55/57.

julian
01-12-2012, 03:23 PM
I've been doing some research on hybrids and stuff, and people always tell me to string the synth gut cross higher on the wilson racquet and the same as the mains on the Yonex racquet, is this because the shape of the racquet is different and if i string higher on the crosses it will collapse.

And also when i open the trapdoor thing on my Pro Open how am i meant to put weights in it? It doesnt have the 2 holes like the APD

And do more headlight racquets swing faster?
1.If you have 2 rackets and they differ only by BALANCE i believe
that MORE HEADLIGHT racket will swing faster at THE ADVANCED LEVEL of
a player.There is a group of coaches who do NOT believe it is true for SERVE

2.To some extent
http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/specsandspeed.php
is addressing your question.
See the paragraph entitled "Power and Balance"

corners
01-12-2012, 06:38 PM
Do more headlight racquets swing faster?

Very good question. First, you have to understand the difference between balance and swingweight. Most people assume that headlight racquets have low swingweight and head-heavy racquets have high swingweight. But that is not true. It may be a general trend, but you can have two racquets that weigh the same amount but the more head-light one has a higher swingweight.

For example, two 12 ounce racquets:

A) Static Weight: 12 ounces
Balance: Even
Swingweight: 330

B) Static Weight: 12 ounces
Balance: 6HL
Swingweight: 340

Which one, A or B, will swing faster? Probably A because the swingweight is lower. In my experience, balance has little to do with swingspeed if two racquets are this close in static weight and swingweight. (But the balance will have a lot to do with how it feels as it swings.)

Swingweight is the most important spec for trying to predict what kind of racquet-head speed you can generate with a racquet. And it is most important at the wrist. We swing racquets with our whole bodies, and the difference between a 300 swingweight racquet and a 350 swingweight racquet will hardly be felt at the shoulder or hips. Both racquets are pretty light compared to the weight of the arm. But at the end of the arm you've got a relatively light hand attached to your wrist. When you swing the racquet it will pivot slightly inside your hand (usually around thumb-level), and your hand and the racquet together will pivot around your wrist, which acts like a hinge. It's at these two pivot points that the difference in swingweight will be felt. You might feel that the 300 swingweight racquet can be whipped around at the wrist with a relaxed grip and swung really fast. By contrast, you might not be able to whip the 350 swingweight racquet at all, and may even have to alter your technique into something more old school to use it effectively.

(There haven't been many experiments on this stuff, but the ones that have been done have shown that the difference in maximum, full-effort, swingspeed between 300 and 350 swingweight will be about 2-3 mph. That doesn't seem like much at all, does it? But I think that the above effect at the wrist, and the alteration of technique most of us have to make to swing the 350, makes the difference much larger in the real world. Most of us don't have the size, talent and strength to whip 350+ swingweight racquets around like 6'2"+ pros can.)

Now, what about two racquets that have the same weight and swingweight, but differ in balance? Like these:

C) 12 ounces
Even
Swingweight: 330

D) 12 ounces
9 points HL
Swingweight: 330

For me, C feels like it swings quicker on groundstrokes and D feels more maneuverable at net. Head-light balance makes a racquet feel light when holding it and moving it in straight lines, like when hitting volleys. When maneuvering it like that, D actually is lighter than C because all of the mass feels like it's hanging off the balance point, which is closer to your hand with D.

But on groundstrokes, the even balance racquet will feel quicker, it will "come around" quicker and more easily. Some people might dispute this, but I think most of them have never tried two racquets like C&D - equal in weight and swingweight but different in balance. If you want to learn more about the way balance point effects the feel and timing of a swing, search "MgR/I" on these forums. There's a poster, travlerajm, who has an interesting theory on this.

Finally, what about this situation: You've got two racquets with the same swingweight, balance point and static weight. But then you add 15 grams to the buttcap of one of them, giving you:

E) 12 ounces
Even balance
330 swingweight

F) 12.5 ounces
6 points headlight
330 swingweight

Now, which of these swings faster? E is lighter by half an ounce. F is heavier but is 6 points headlight. Both have the same swingweight.

I set up a poll a while back asking for what people thought about this question. Here it is: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=387846

So, as you can see from that poll, there is no easy answer to your question. Maybe there isn't any answer at all. :)

julian
01-13-2012, 08:51 AM
Do more headlight racquets swing faster?

Very good question. First, you have to understand the difference between balance and swingweight. Most people assume that headlight racquets have low swingweight and head-heavy racquets have high swingweight. But that is not true. It may be a general trend, but you can have two racquets that weigh the same amount but the more head-light one has a higher swingweight.

For example, two 12 ounce racquets:

A) Static Weight: 12 ounces
Balance: Even
Swingweight: 330

B) Static Weight: 12 ounces
Balance: 6HL
Swingweight: 340

Which one, A or B, will swing faster? Probably A because the swingweight is lower. In my experience, balance has little to do with swingspeed if two racquets are this close in static weight and swingweight. (But the balance will have a lot to do with how it feels as it swings.)

Swingweight is the most important spec for trying to predict what kind of racquet-head speed you can generate with a racquet. And it is most important at the wrist. We swing racquets with our whole bodies, and the difference between a 300 swingweight racquet and a 350 swingweight racquet will hardly be felt at the shoulder or hips. Both racquets are pretty light compared to the weight of the arm. But at the end of the arm you've got a relatively light hand attached to your wrist. When you swing the racquet it will pivot slightly inside your hand (usually around thumb-level), and your hand and the racquet together will pivot around your wrist, which acts like a hinge. It's at these two pivot points that the difference in swingweight will be felt. You might feel that the 300 swingweight racquet can be whipped around at the wrist with a relaxed grip and swung really fast. By contrast, you might not be able to whip the 350 swingweight racquet at all, and may even have to alter your technique into something more old school to use it effectively.

(There haven't been many experiments on this stuff, but the ones that have been done have shown that the difference in maximum, full-effort, swingspeed between 300 and 350 swingweight will be about 2-3 mph. That doesn't seem like much at all, does it? But I think that the above effect at the wrist, and the alteration of technique most of us have to make to swing the 350, makes the difference much larger in the real world. Most of us don't have the size, talent and strength to whip 350+ swingweight racquets around like 6'2"+ pros can.)

Now, what about two racquets that have the same weight and swingweight, but differ in balance? Like these:

C) 12 ounces
Even
Swingweight: 330

D) 12 ounces
9 points HL
Swingweight: 330

For me, C feels like it swings quicker on groundstrokes and D feels more maneuverable at net. Head-light balance makes a racquet feel light when holding it and moving it in straight lines, like when hitting volleys. When maneuvering it like that, D actually is lighter than C because all of the mass feels like it's hanging off the balance point, which is closer to your hand with D.

But on groundstrokes, the even balance racquet will feel quicker, it will "come around" quicker and more easily. Some people might dispute this, but I think most of them have never tried two racquets like C&D - equal in weight and swingweight but different in balance. If you want to learn more about the way balance point effects the feel and timing of a swing, search "MgR/I" on these forums. There's a poster, travlerajm, who has an interesting theory on this.

Finally, what about this situation: You've got two racquets with the same swingweight, balance point and static weight. But then you add 15 grams to the buttcap of one of them, giving you:

E) 12 ounces
Even balance
330 swingweight

F) 12.5 ounces
6 points headlight
330 swingweight

Now, which of these swings faster? E is lighter by half an ounce. F is heavier but is 6 points headlight. Both have the same swingweight.

I set up a poll a while back asking for what people thought about this question. Here it is: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=387846

So, as you can see from that poll, there is no easy answer to your question. Maybe there isn't any answer at all. :)
Which one of C or D is better for serve?

corners
01-13-2012, 09:30 AM
Which one of C or D is better for serve?

I don't know Julian. For two racquets like this, both having the same weight and swingweight, but one being more headlight, the difference is mainly in the feel of how it swings- the timing of the racquet head "coming around." It's kind of about what feels right to you. I actually don't have that big of a preference on serve. On groundstrokes the even balance one feels faster to me, and the headlight one a little sluggish, but on serve I could probably do fine with either one.

julian
01-14-2012, 07:57 AM
Do more headlight racquets swing faster?

Very good question. First, you have to understand the difference between balance and swingweight. Most people assume that headlight racquets have low swingweight and head-heavy racquets have high swingweight. But that is not true. It may be a general trend, but you can have two racquets that weigh the same amount but the more head-light one has a higher swingweight.

For example, two 12 ounce racquets:

A) Static Weight: 12 ounces
Balance: Even
Swingweight: 330

B) Static Weight: 12 ounces
Balance: 6HL
Swingweight: 340

Which one, A or B, will swing faster? Probably A because the swingweight is lower. In my experience, balance has little to do with swingspeed if two racquets are this close in static weight and swingweight. (But the balance will have a lot to do with how it feels as it swings.)

Swingweight is the most important spec for trying to predict what kind of racquet-head speed you can generate with a racquet. And it is most important at the wrist. We swing racquets with our whole bodies, and the difference between a 300 swingweight racquet and a 350 swingweight racquet will hardly be felt at the shoulder or hips. Both racquets are pretty light compared to the weight of the arm. But at the end of the arm you've got a relatively light hand attached to your wrist. When you swing the racquet it will pivot slightly inside your hand (usually around thumb-level), and your hand and the racquet together will pivot around your wrist, which acts like a hinge. It's at these two pivot points that the difference in swingweight will be felt. You might feel that the 300 swingweight racquet can be whipped around at the wrist with a relaxed grip and swung really fast. By contrast, you might not be able to whip the 350 swingweight racquet at all, and may even have to alter your technique into something more old school to use it effectively.

(There haven't been many experiments on this stuff, but the ones that have been done have shown that the difference in maximum, full-effort, swingspeed between 300 and 350 swingweight will be about 2-3 mph. That doesn't seem like much at all, does it? But I think that the above effect at the wrist, and the alteration of technique most of us have to make to swing the 350, makes the difference much larger in the real world. Most of us don't have the size, talent and strength to whip 350+ swingweight racquets around like 6'2"+ pros can.)

Now, what about two racquets that have the same weight and swingweight, but differ in balance? Like these:

C) 12 ounces
Even
Swingweight: 330

D) 12 ounces
9 points HL
Swingweight: 330

For me, C feels like it swings quicker on groundstrokes and D feels more maneuverable at net. Head-light balance makes a racquet feel light when holding it and moving it in straight lines, like when hitting volleys. When maneuvering it like that, D actually is lighter than C because all of the mass feels like it's hanging off the balance point, which is closer to your hand with D.

But on groundstrokes, the even balance racquet will feel quicker, it will "come around" quicker and more easily. Some people might dispute this, but I think most of them have never tried two racquets like C&D - equal in weight and swingweight but different in balance. If you want to learn more about the way balance point effects the feel and timing of a swing, search "MgR/I" on these forums. There's a poster, travlerajm, who has an interesting theory on this.

Finally, what about this situation: You've got two racquets with the same swingweight, balance point and static weight. But then you add 15 grams to the buttcap of one of them, giving you:

E) 12 ounces
Even balance
330 swingweight

F) 12.5 ounces
6 points headlight
330 swingweight

Now, which of these swings faster? E is lighter by half an ounce. F is heavier but is 6 points headlight. Both have the same swingweight.

I set up a poll a while back asking for what people thought about this question. Here it is: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=387846

So, as you can see from that poll, there is no easy answer to your question. Maybe there isn't any answer at all. :)
Another question,if you do NOT mind
Headlight rackets better/easier for teaching/coaching?