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Jamesm182
01-10-2012, 03:51 AM
Im currently looking to apply some lead tape to my Tecnifibre T Fight 295's
Ideally i would like the balance to remain the same , and was wondering if this setup would acheive that.

If i place 3g on the handle, and 1.5 grams each side at 3 & 9 , would this leave the balance the same? and also how much would the swingweight be affected?
I know its a individual process and based around feel and opinions, but im just looking for a little guidance, as i've never used LT properly before.
Im quite an advanced player, but previous injuries leave me needing to play with a light maneuverable frame.

Thanks for any help guys ! much appreciated!

martin
01-10-2012, 04:11 AM
Where do you want to place the grams leadtape on the handle. Top, middle or end??

This link will help you but i wouldn't think to much about the balance. Just experiment and find your ideal set-up. It took me a long time before i found my ideal specs.

http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/customizationReverse.php

Jamesm182
01-10-2012, 05:04 AM
where would you recommend? is inside the buttcap the best place to try?

i appreciate the need for experiment , but was wondering more along the lines of if what i proposed would make a noticeable difference?

Thanks very much for the link and response

Racquet-Priority
01-10-2012, 05:09 AM
First of all, a lighter frame is not better for your arm. How heavier your frame is how less impact is on your arm. You should go the heaviest you can handle, preferable a head-light frame.

Second there's not best place for leed tape. Just try and error. If you want to keep the ballance the same, place on the same distance of the balancepoint the same amount of lead tape.

I.e. your ballance is now 32,0 cm you should place 3 gram at 22 cm and 3 gram at 42 cm from the butcap to remain the same balancepoint.

martin
01-10-2012, 05:45 AM
where would you recommend? is inside the buttcap the best place to try?

i appreciate the need for experiment , but was wondering more along the lines of if what i proposed would make a noticeable difference?

Thanks very much for the link and response

Try a heavier grip and use some leadtape in the throat(both from top to the bottom) and maybe a strip of leadtape at 6 o'clock.
Ignore the balance as this will make your racket more headlight but you add mass and will make the racket more stable without making the racket too powerful.
If it's all about the balance then do what Racquet-Priority says but he's right about using the heaviest headlight racket you can handle.

Jamesm182
01-10-2012, 06:05 AM
I'm curious , what benefit would using a heavier racket be to me?

The list of frames i have used previously (recently) are

Babolat APDC
Fischer m pro 1 98
Head Microgel Radical Pro
Head Youtek Speed MP

I found when i used the speed during a hard long match that my arms got tired and had some pain the next day, I also coach quite a bit , which was where the lighter frame came in , just having something easy to swing for lessons etc. Then when i got the Tecnifibre i just preferred the feel of it and any arm pain disappeared.

spaceman_spiff
01-10-2012, 06:16 AM
I'm curious , what benefit would using a heavier racket be to me?

The list of frames i have used previously (recently) are

Babolat APDC
Fischer m pro 1 98
Head Microgel Radical Pro
Head Youtek Speed MP

I found when i used the speed during a hard long match that my arms got tired and had some pain the next day, I also coach quite a bit , which was where the lighter frame came in , just having something easy to swing for lessons etc. Then when i got the Tecnifibre i just preferred the feel of it and any arm pain disappeared.

Given two frames with identical head size, string pattern, and flex, the one with a higher swingweight will deliver more power with the same swing speed or the same power with a slower swing speed.

So, if you were to add a decent amount of weight around 12, 3, and 9 on your Technifibres, you'd find that you could slow down your swing and still get the same power, which I imagine would be quite helpful when coaching given that an easy, smooth swing is more appealing than a fast, whippy swing. Also, as RP mentioned, it will decrease the shock you feel in your arm.

martin
01-10-2012, 07:21 AM
Given two frames with identical head size, string pattern, and flex, the one with a higher swingweight will deliver more power with the same swing speed or the same power with a slower swing speed.

So, if you were to add a decent amount of weight around 12, 3, and 9 on your Technifibres, you'd find that you could slow down your swing and still get the same power, which I imagine would be quite helpful when coaching given that an easy, smooth swing is more appealing than a fast, whippy swing. Also, as RP mentioned, it will decrease the shock you feel in your arm.

As i understand the op doesn't want to bump up the swingweight but simply wants to add leadtape.
The only way to achieve this is leadtape in the throat and in the handle so the racket will still be maneuverable and a lot more stable.

Racquet-Priority
01-10-2012, 07:31 AM
The only way to not effect the swingweight is putting lead between 0 and 10 cm from the butcap

spaceman_spiff
01-10-2012, 08:33 AM
As i understand the op doesn't want to bump up the swingweight but simply wants to add leadtape.
The only way to achieve this is leadtape in the throat and in the handle so the racket will still be maneuverable and a lot more stable.

Any weight added anywhere will affect swingweight. The only difference is the magnitude of the effect.

Weight around the handle will have a very small effect (but will not decrease SW), weight in the throat will have a moderate effect, and weight in the upper half of the hoop will have a major effect. In the end, the more you increase stability, the more you increase the swingweight; the two are directly connected.

It's like adding weight to a hammer. You can put all the lead tape you want on the handle, but that won't really help you drive nails any better. You need weight in the head to be effective.

TaihtDuhShaat
01-10-2012, 08:36 AM
Lead 1/4 the way up the hammer will help you drive in nails better!

This is the same wrapping lead around the top of the grip from 7-9".

7" for flexier feel, 9" for stiff

martin
01-10-2012, 08:50 AM
Any weight added anywhere will affect swingweight. The only difference is the magnitude of the effect.

Weight around the handle will have a very small effect (but will not decrease SW), weight in the throat will have a moderate effect, and weight in the upper half of the hoop will have a major effect. In the end, the more you increase stability, the more you increase the swingweight; the two are directly connected.

It's like adding weight to a hammer. You can put all the lead tape you want on the handle, but that won't really help you drive nails any better. You need weight in the head to be effective.

The problem with leadtape at 3 and 9 and 12 o'clock is that you change the swingweight and balance significantly so if you want to do this you certainly have to counterbalance in the handle but then you're changing your racket in a polarized set-up(most weight at the top and end of the racket).
Adding weight in the throat gives definitely a more solid feel and can be a very important factor if you like a more depolarized set-up.
Try to imagine how it feels when there is no mass in the middle and you can understand the effect on stability.

spaceman_spiff
01-10-2012, 08:58 AM
Lead 1/4 the way up the hammer will help you drive in nails better!

This is the same wrapping lead around the top of the grip from 7-9".

7" for flexier feel, 9" for stiff

Weight 1/4 way up will have some effect, but will it be as effective as weight all the way up in the head?

Take a look at a sledge hammer. What are the differences between it and a normal hammer? First, the handle is longer. Second, the head is much heavier.

Now, what are the differences between a normal hammer and a tack hammer? First, the handle on the tack hammer is shorter. Second, the head ways much less than a normal hammer.

When someone wants to drive nails, they don't take a tack hammer and add weight to the handle and then try to swing it faster. And, when someone wants to break down walls, they don't take a normal hammer and add weight to the handle and try to swing it faster.

The bigger the job, the bigger the hammer.

spaceman_spiff
01-10-2012, 09:17 AM
The problem with leadtape at 3 and 9 and 12 o'clock is that you change the swingweight and balance significantly so if you want to do this you certainly have to counterbalance in the handle but then you're changing your racket in a polarized set-up(most weight at the top and end of the racket).
Adding weight in the throat gives definitely a more solid feel and can be a very important factor if you like a more depolarized set-up.
Try to imagine how it feels when there is no mass in the middle and you can understand the effect on stability.

Every player will have different preferences. But in the end, there will be certain similarities between them all.

First, there will be a certain amount of weight in the head to prevent twisting on off-center shots or a dead upper string bed (the amount differs for each player). Second, there will be a certain amount of weight necessary in the handle to provide the preferred overall balance. Third, there will be a certain amount of weight necessary in the throat for feel and stability on volleys, slice backhands, and other shots that have little wrist action.

If the OP wants more stability on groundstrokes and serves, then he needs more weight in the head. If he chooses to counter-balance that, then he'll need more weight in the handle (he might choose not to, though, if he likes the new balance better). If, after these changes, he wants more weight in the throat for volleys, slice, etc., then he can add more weight there.

Personally, anytime I get a new frame, I go in that order until I get the setup just right for my tastes.

Racquet-Priority
01-10-2012, 11:33 AM
What the normal rules are:

Weight at 3 & 9 = increased twistweight (for ofcentre hits)
Weight at 10 & 2 = increased twistweight & raises sweetspot
Weight at 12 = raises sweetspot

all those solutions = more weight / higher swingweight / more control and stability in more or less ways.

ian2
01-10-2012, 12:24 PM
Just a personal observation: I added 2g of lead at 12 and was amazed by the difference it made. It's just 2 grams, right? But there is noticeably more power and spin, and a different feel: the racket flexes a bit differently, there is more feedback, and it seem the ball is staying on the strings a bit longer.

Frame: Donnay X-White. Customization: leather grip (+12g) + 5g butt cap + all inserts (4g) + baseball tape around head (3g) + 2g lead at 12 + overgrip (4g) + vib. dampener (1g).
Strings: Weiss-Cannon Scorpion 1.22 @ 53 / Gosen Sheep Micro 17 @ 56 X.
Final spec: 337g, 6.5 HL. Wish I knew the swingweight... my guesstimate is around 320.

Maui19
01-10-2012, 03:05 PM
Just a personal observation: I added 2g of lead at 12 and was amazed by the difference it made. It's just 2 grams, right? But there is noticeably more power and spin, and a different feel: the racket flexes a bit differently, there is more feedback, and it seem the ball is staying on the strings a bit longer.

I had something similar happen. I was trying to get my racquet to feel a liitle more solid, so I added 3g at 12. I was amazed at how much more solid my racquet felt. It definitely enhanced spin on groundies and serve as well--and I though it would reduce spin!

TaihtDuhShaat
01-10-2012, 03:25 PM
The fastest way to increase recoil weight is adding lead at 12. That gives the felling like you don't need to swing as fast on fast incoming pace or volleys.