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View Full Version : Does anybody hit a two-hand forehand besides me?


USS Tang
01-18-2012, 01:35 PM
My two-hand forehand gives me more pace than using one hand. But,[then again, the shot is mostly flat. Topspin is difficult to generate. Any suggestions?

mad dog1
01-18-2012, 01:40 PM
yeah, Marion Bartoli hits a 2 hand forehand as does Johnny Wang.

and here's............Johnny!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jDf4OsatrA

BevelDevil
01-18-2012, 02:10 PM
One of my hitting partners does (she's a female). She generates topspin naturally in part because of her grips: Bottom hand semi-western, top hand continental. I believe Monica Seles used this combination.

My partner started out using top hand Eastern, but I encouraged her to move her top hand to continental to add more topspin. It seems to have worked. So don't forget that the top hand has influence over the overall swing.

What grip setup are you using now for your forehand?

Also, what do you do on your backhand? What grips?

USS Tang
01-18-2012, 02:36 PM
I am right-handed. My bottom (right) hand is eastern grip; my top (left) is continental. I will follow your advice and go semi-western on the bottom hand.

BevelDevil
01-18-2012, 03:50 PM
Of course, make sure your swing path is in a proper low-to-high fashion. Also, keep in mind, it helps with power and topspin to lay back your bottom wrist on the backswing. Use your top hand to help pull the racket up to your shoulder.


What's your backhand like? This is important!

Here's why: if your forehand is (going from top/bottom) is continental/SW, and your backhand is something like Eastern/continental, when you transition from FH to BH or vice versa, you will be shifting grips on both hands, which is a huge pain when against a volleyer or a big serve.

This is the exact setup of someone I hit with (and teach) and I recommended to her that her "ready position" should be continental/continental, so she could easily switch between FH and BH.

So think about how you want to transition from FH to BH, and BH to FH.

Bergboy123
01-18-2012, 04:48 PM
I don't do 2hfh in tennis, but in ping pong I can do 2hbh easily and am learning 2hfh! :D

USS Tang
01-18-2012, 05:25 PM
BevilDevil, excellent point you make about shifting grips. Formerly, I used two continental grips which made it easy to volley at the net. My one-hand backhand with a continental grip is my strongest ground stroke, so I know I will have problems shifting from the semi-western at the baseline to the continental as I approach the net. Any other suggestions?

DoctorBackhand
01-18-2012, 06:25 PM
I do! And so do these people..
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=297438
And these guys...
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3849FCABA026E7DA&feature=mh_lolz
And 1stSeed, and some other people on this board. Hope this helped!

papa
01-18-2012, 06:42 PM
Its actually a valid option for the forehand. Dave Smith also teaches and advocates the use of two hans as an option - its not for everyone but I have quite a few players who stay with it.

I would strongly recomend Dave's books - Tennis Mastery & Coaching Masyery.

BevelDevil
01-20-2012, 11:32 AM
BevilDevil, excellent point you make about shifting grips. Formerly, I used two continental grips which made it easy to volley at the net. My one-hand backhand with a continental grip is my strongest ground stroke, so I know I will have problems shifting from the semi-western at the baseline to the continental as I approach the net. Any other suggestions?

You grip setup is fine. You're not shifting any more than the typical modern player, sw fh to continental seems to be standard.

As for more tips, ideally you would post a video. But if I had to give generic advice it is:

-keep the contact point further back than you would with a 1hfh

-when you contact, your body should be roughly facing 2 o'clock, rather than straight ahead (12 o'clock). So your shoulders are generating power from a relatively small rotation, body moving from 4 to 2 o'clock, then following through to 1 o'clock.

-layback your bottom wrist, and layforward your top wrist on takeback, but straighten them both out by contact. The double wrist action adds rackethead speed, power and topspin

-follow through over your shoulder.

-watch Monica Seles videos. But keep in mind she's left handed.

Keep us posted!

Zachol82
01-20-2012, 09:12 PM
I feel like a 2hfh takes too much core and body to generate the same level of penetration. This is NOT to say that you CAN'T do it, it's just more difficult...physically because it's just a simple fact that a 2hfh offers less leverage compared to that of a 1hfh. The grip naturally lends itself to topspin, but penetration seems like it is lacking, assuming that the same amount of force is asserted that is.

Fedchamp
01-20-2012, 09:30 PM
I did when I first started playing as a child. But as soon as I could swing with one hand, I found it was better all round for me. I can't understand how players could stick with a 2hfh, especially the pros. That's my opinion anyway.

papa
01-21-2012, 12:26 PM
Well, the reality is that some players like/have success with using two hands on both sides - at all levels. So although it might not be for everyone it has its place.

BevelDevil
01-21-2012, 01:34 PM
I agree that the 2hFh has less potential for most players. However, it may be superior to the modern forehand for players who have limited coordination or limited practice time. The modern forehand seems to take more work compared to either the 2hFh or the classical swing.

Also, the weakness of the 2hFh-- limited reach and pace potential-- can be ameliorated by taking advantage of its strengths:

1. Ease in hitting on the rise due to the compact swing. Supposedly Monica Seles had mediocre movement and was an average player behind the baseline. But when she stepped in and hit on the rise she would dominate the point.

2. Well disguised, top-spin heavy angles, passing shots and lobs.

A serious 2hFh player should defintely work on these things. He/she should also incorporate the 1hFh for stretch returns and hitting on the run.

USS Tang
01-21-2012, 01:57 PM
BevelDevil et al., thanks for the comments. I hit a one-hand forehand from the right side for 40 years, but a shoulder injury forced me to switch to two hands. I've been able to alternate between two different types of strokes on the right side: one with my left hand below the right (a classical lefty two-hand backhand) and the more unorthodox left-above-right hand grip. The former gives me better topspin; the latter lets me hit laser-like shots deep. Trouble is that occurs only one out of 10 times. I tried what BevelDevil suggested about generating topspin with left-above-right, but wasn't successful on my first outing. One real strength of left-above-right is volleying. I can feather the racket head at the last moment for a more precise volley. Also, when a shot is drilled toward my right hip, two hands on the racket lets me adjust at the last milli-second to get the ball back over the net.