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sunof tennis
01-19-2012, 02:28 PM
Has anyone looked into whether an abbreviated serve motion ala Roddick actually produces less stress on the shoulder? I know Sharapova after her shoulder injury tried, but eventually went back to her old service motion, although I think she went back because of the results, not for health reasons.

LeeD
01-19-2012, 02:34 PM
JayBerger, JuanIgnacioChela.
Of course, you have to try it to see if it help YOUR problems. Those guys seemed to have had range of motion issues. Do you?
Of equal importance is to dial back the severity of the swing, to limit the range of motion, and to protect from over extending your ligament and tendon flexibility. Hit flatter, more speed, less spin. Hit more accurately, needing less serves and motion per service attempt.

sunof tennis
01-19-2012, 03:33 PM
Thanks for your advice. Hope it was just a one time deal from trying to overhit.

charliefedererer
01-20-2012, 09:09 AM
Want to really protect your shoulder in the future ?

Do the thrower's ten exercises: http://www.muhlenberg.edu/pdf/main/athletics/athletic_training/throwers10.pdf

Here's why:

"Rotator Cuff and Shoulder Blade Stabilization

In this article we want to focus on the shoulder and muscles that stabilize that joint. When you talk about tennis and the shoulder the first thing that likely comes to mind is the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is important in tennis, but often times strength imbalances exist within the rotator cuff that can lead to injury. Most notably, tennis players tend to be weak in the muscles that externally rotate the shoulder. External rotation is an outward rotation and is the opposite of the shoulder motion players make when they serve or hit a forehand. To improve strength of the external rotators you can perform the exercises described in this section of the web page. This exercise should be performed with the dominant arm, but should really be performed with both arms if time permits.

Not many people think of the upper back when considering how to strengthen and protect the shoulder. But try this simple drill. Place your hand on the shoulder blades of a player and ask him to raise his arms. Can you feel the shoulder blades move? Shoulder movement is very complex and involves movement of the shoulder blade as well as the actual shoulder joint itself. Weakness in the upper back muscles that stabilize the shoulder blades can cause the shoulder to function improperly and may actually contribute to shoulder pain. Exercises that train the stabilizers of the shoulder blade can help tennis players optimize performance and avoid shoulder injury."
- http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Game/Sport-Science/114707_Strength__Conditioning_Exercise_Techniques/


"Forearm & Rotator Cuff Exercises

Rotator cuff exercises can help to prevent common injuries that occur in sports such as tennis, golf and baseball.

During a [serve] for example, the posterior rotator cuff muscles (external rotators, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor) are exposed to considerable eccentric contraction during the declaration phase (1,2,3,4). Unfortunately, many traditional isotonic exercises may not be effective at targeting the rotator cuff muscles (5).

The problem is often compounded with heavy resistance training. As the athlete strengthens the major muscle groups the rotator cuffs become disproportionately weak. They are placed under increasing strain as they try to 'keep up' with stronger muscles surrounding them. A program of specialist rotator cuff exercises to compliment regular strength training may be able to improve the strength of more isolated muscle groups such as the rotator cuff (5,6). Additionally, training these otherwise neglected muscles may even improve performance (6) as well as help to prevent future injury.

Athletes who are prone to rotator cuff damage are also often prone to tennis elbow. For the same reasons, it's worthwhile to perform some forearm and wrist strengthening exercises to help prevent this other common overuse injury occurring."
- http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/rotator-cuff-exercises.html

http://zachdechant.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/rtc.jpg

http://www.mdguidelines.com/images/Illustrations/ro_c_tea.jpg

spun_out
01-20-2012, 09:22 AM
Having gone from full to abbreviated motion (and recently back to full for a brief stint), the abbreviated motion does help my shoulder remain pain free, but I think it depends on how the pain is being produced.

I think that abbreviated motion helps if you have a tendency to lift (or shrug) the racquet up to the trophy position rather than use gravity to do so because 1) the abbreviated motion does not depend as much on gravity to lift up the racquet as it is never that low to begin with; and 2) it is much easier to get the feel of consciously turning your shoulder (rather than feeling the arm or the hand) to get the racquet in trophy position.

The abbreviated motion might also help if your pain is coming from you extending the racquet too far out in front on the follow through because I feel that the abbreviated motion lends itself to a more natural upward motion.

I hope this helps.

sunof tennis
01-20-2012, 10:20 AM
Want to really protect your shoulder in the future ?

Do the thrower's ten exercises: http://www.muhlenberg.edu/pdf/main/athletics/athletic_training/throwers10.pdf

Here's why:

"Rotator Cuff and Shoulder Blade Stabilization

In this article we want to focus on the shoulder and muscles that stabilize that joint. When you talk about tennis and the shoulder the first thing that likely comes to mind is the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is important in tennis, but often times strength imbalances exist within the rotator cuff that can lead to injury. Most notably, tennis players tend to be weak in the muscles that externally rotate the shoulder. External rotation is an outward rotation and is the opposite of the shoulder motion players make when they serve or hit a forehand. To improve strength of the external rotators you can perform the exercises described in this section of the web page. This exercise should be performed with the dominant arm, but should really be performed with both arms if time permits.

Not many people think of the upper back when considering how to strengthen and protect the shoulder. But try this simple drill. Place your hand on the shoulder blades of a player and ask him to raise his arms. Can you feel the shoulder blades move? Shoulder movement is very complex and involves movement of the shoulder blade as well as the actual shoulder joint itself. Weakness in the upper back muscles that stabilize the shoulder blades can cause the shoulder to function improperly and may actually contribute to shoulder pain. Exercises that train the stabilizers of the shoulder blade can help tennis players optimize performance and avoid shoulder injury."
- http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Game/Sport-Science/114707_Strength__Conditioning_Exercise_Techniques/


"Forearm & Rotator Cuff Exercises

Rotator cuff exercises can help to prevent common injuries that occur in sports such as tennis, golf and baseball.

During a [serve] for example, the posterior rotator cuff muscles (external rotators, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor) are exposed to considerable eccentric contraction during the declaration phase (1,2,3,4). Unfortunately, many traditional isotonic exercises may not be effective at targeting the rotator cuff muscles (5).

The problem is often compounded with heavy resistance training. As the athlete strengthens the major muscle groups the rotator cuffs become disproportionately weak. They are placed under increasing strain as they try to 'keep up' with stronger muscles surrounding them. A program of specialist rotator cuff exercises to compliment regular strength training may be able to improve the strength of more isolated muscle groups such as the rotator cuff (5,6). Additionally, training these otherwise neglected muscles may even improve performance (6) as well as help to prevent future injury.

Athletes who are prone to rotator cuff damage are also often prone to tennis elbow. For the same reasons, it's worthwhile to perform some forearm and wrist strengthening exercises to help prevent this other common overuse injury occurring."
- http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/rotator-cuff-exercises.html

http://zachdechant.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/rtc.jpg

http://www.mdguidelines.com/images/Illustrations/ro_c_tea.jpg

Very thorough and worth while. Thanks

sunof tennis
01-20-2012, 10:21 AM
Having gone from full to abbreviated motion (and recently back to full for a brief stint), the abbreviated motion does help my shoulder remain pain free, but I think it depends on how the pain is being produced.

I think that abbreviated motion helps if you have a tendency to lift (or shrug) the racquet up to the trophy position rather than use gravity to do so because 1) the abbreviated motion does not depend as much on gravity to lift up the racquet as it is never that low to begin with; and 2) it is much easier to get the feel of consciously turning your shoulder (rather than feeling the arm or the hand) to get the racquet in trophy position.

The abbreviated motion might also help if your pain is coming from you extending the racquet too far out in front on the follow through because I feel that the abbreviated motion lends itself to a more natural upward motion.

I hope this helps.

Thanks for the input.

NLBwell
01-21-2012, 05:02 AM
What I've found easiest on the shoulder is a McEnroe-like serve. Your back to the court and toss to the right. I served with a Pat Rafter-like motion for many years and it gradually wears the shoulder away from the impingement. The McEnroe motion keeps your upper arm away from your ear and so no pinching and impingement.