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luishcorreia
01-19-2012, 03:07 PM
Going down the line is one of the most low percentage shots when talking about ground strokes - at least compared with a cross court shot.

Going down the line and changing the direction of the ball has a lot to do with Directional Rules.

I hope you enjoy the new post and keep visiting the blog.

http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com/2012/01/when-to-pull-triggerdown-line.html

Rock Strongo
01-19-2012, 03:10 PM
As soon as you get an opportunity I say!

LeeD
01-19-2012, 03:19 PM
Personally, I don't believe in "by the book" tennis strategy.
You should hit the shots your are capable of, and hit less often the shots your aren't.
Some players are great at going DTL. Should they follow the same rules?
And I find that going DTL in the middle of a baseline rally is most effective with a shorter, softer hit ball, dying at times before reaching the baseline.
Unconventional thought? Maybe, but it works sometimes. If you can shorten your stroke and block the ball instead of swinging out, USUALLY, your percentages of successful shot placement increases.

Fedexpress94
01-19-2012, 04:59 PM
I usually go down the line when I'm inside the baseline and have a slow ball I can rip.

LeeD
01-19-2012, 05:06 PM
I usually go down the line when I'm bored with this constant rallying and I need to stop the endless running and fetching.

mxmx
01-20-2012, 02:36 AM
All i know is that i don't hit this shot nearly enough...

chippy17
01-20-2012, 05:13 AM
Personally, I don't believe in "by the book" tennis strategy.
You should hit the shots your are capable of, and hit less often the shots your aren't.
Some players are great at going DTL. Should they follow the same rules?
And I find that going DTL in the middle of a baseline rally is most effective with a shorter, softer hit ball, dying at times before reaching the baseline.
Unconventional thought? Maybe, but it works sometimes. If you can shorten your stroke and block the ball instead of swinging out, USUALLY, your percentages of successful shot placement increases.

i've started going dtl more as my regular opponents were reading my cc forehand too easily and it has caught many off guard!

also I agree with you that a dtl shot does not have to be hit hard and deep to be a winning shot, was very successfull in my last match hitting a softer dtl as close as I could to the line but, as you say, only on about the service line with not a lot of power and opponent was so too far away to get to it

Limpinhitter
01-20-2012, 05:38 AM
The high percentage opportunities to go dtl are:
(1) Taking a short and/or weak shot from the ground,
(2) Approach shots,
(3) Passing shots from well inside the baseline,
(4) When you've pulled the opponent so far wide with a sharp angle you can hit a winner dtl without having to play too close to the sideline ie: half way between the sideline and center line.

LeeD
01-20-2012, 12:02 PM
My most used DTL situation results from a CC rally where I happen to hit deep and wide CC, making my opponent fetch from sideline and deep behind his baseline, then a SHORT LOW slice DTL.

rkelley
01-20-2012, 12:39 PM
My most used DTL situation results from a CC rally where I happen to hit deep and wide CC, making my opponent fetch from sideline and deep behind his baseline, then a SHORT LOW slice DTL.

This works especially well to the opponents bh I've found, because it's a bit harder to dig out that deep, wide shot. When you recognized that you've hit that cc shot really deep and wide, with some heat, then it's also good to move up one or two steps in preparation for the short, weak return.

This falls in the more general catagory of recognizing when you've hurt your opponent, even if you really did mean to, and capitalizing on it.

LeeD
01-20-2012, 12:43 PM
Most of my singles opponents, if I hit deep and CC to their forehands, a short DTL gives me an advantage at the service line.
Unfortunately, a deep DTL approach from there gives the advantage back to my baseline running opponent, who now has the right depth to perform his passing shots.

rkelley
01-20-2012, 12:44 PM
The high percentage opportunities to go dtl are:
(1) Taking a short and/or weak shot from the ground,
(2) Approach shots,
(3) Passing shots from well inside the baseline,
(4) When you've pulled the opponent so far wide with a sharp angle you can hit a winner dtl without having to play too close to the sideline ie: half way between the sideline and center line.

Agreed with the above. The one other thing I'd add to this list is if your opponent is camping on the cc side because they know you're never going DTL unless the ball is weak, I think it's worth it to occasionally take the ball DTL to keep them honest. If they're that far over to the cc you can often hit it for a winner or at least seriously hurt them. The long term effect is that it makes the cc shots more effective if they feel like they have to cover the DTL.

Limp may not agree.

LeeD
01-20-2012, 12:54 PM
Personally, not sure about #3.
When I'm attempting a pass from well behind my own baseline, I seldom win the point by hitting sharp angled CC, as that heavy spinning and short depth shot is not his nearly as FAST as a DTL pass attempt, and the longer distance coupled with a slower moving ball gives the netman more time to reach and step accross to cover CC passes, plus it gives him the easy DTL volley for a clean winner.
A fast moving DTL pass attempt is better, as it only gives the opponent ONE volley angle, you already at this DTL target, so you know which way to plant your feet in prep of the long run. High net makes little difference here, as you're well behind your baseline and HAVE the long court DTL.

LeeD
01-20-2012, 12:55 PM
And of course, 1 and 2 are all inclusive...redundtant.

dominikk1985
01-20-2012, 01:24 PM
Going down the line is one of the most low percentage shots when talking about ground strokes - at least compared with a cross court shot.

Going down the line and changing the direction of the ball has a lot to do with Directional Rules.

I hope you enjoy the new post and keep visiting the blog.

http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com/2012/01/when-to-pull-triggerdown-line.html

generally yes. the more the ball angles away from you the more low percentage your shot will be. if the ball angles into you or only angles away slightly you can easier down the line.

but of course tennis players know that. even if they have not read "directionals" they know that an agle cc shot usually will be returned cross and a shot that lands inside the sidelines can be hit DTL easier.

so really good players will also have to hit DTL against angle shots. this is a low percentage shot of course against a shortangle but guys like federer and nadal are still very good at it. that is why they are the best they can hit any spot in the court at any time.

for the normal player it is usually better to return the shots which have a good angle (to the sideline) cc and only go DTL if the oppent give you a shot with less angle that you hit inside the sidelines.

rkelley
01-20-2012, 01:26 PM
Personally, not sure about #3.
When I'm attempting a pass from well behind my own baseline, I seldom win the point by hitting sharp angled CC, as that heavy spinning and short depth shot is not his nearly as FAST as a DTL pass attempt, and the longer distance coupled with a slower moving ball gives the netman more time to reach and step accross to cover CC passes, plus it gives him the easy DTL volley for a clean winner.
A fast moving DTL pass attempt is better, as it only gives the opponent ONE volley angle, you already at this DTL target, so you know which way to plant your feet in prep of the long run. High net makes little difference here, as you're well behind your baseline and HAVE the long court DTL.

I like the long, DTL pass as well. It's still a shorter distance to the net and gives your opponent less time to react. Because of the shorter distance you don't have to hit it as hard either.

That said, as I've grown more comfortable with my new-ish modern fh (been about 10 months now), I find that the big cut, cc shot with lots of spin is really effective. Your opponent can see it, and they can react to it, but they often can't get to it as it just keeps trailing away from them as they reach out to hit it. I've been on the receiving end of that stupid shot for so many years, it's nice to be dishing it out now once in a while.

LeeD
01-20-2012, 01:38 PM
Yeah, the modern strokes do tend to open up more angles. With a good topspin pass attempt, forehand or backhand, I seem to be able to create more angle than the old days. DTL, the ball can pass the net easily a foot wide, then the spin takes over and curls the ball in.
And we know the effects of heavier topspin...more short angles, higher margins for error.