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Ducker
01-22-2012, 12:30 PM
My biggest weakness in tennis is my mental game. Its not so much what the other player can do on the court that affects my mental game. I do fine mentally no matter if iam playing bad, the other player gets lucky shots, pushes, or anything else you can imagine. It does not bother me, I stay positive.

Of course I dont like losing like im sure no one here does, but I can handle it mentally.

WHAT I CANT HANDLE IS. Bad calls ( calls I see in and the other person sees out) and score disputes.

Score disputes are my number one pet peeve. I go beserk when I think the score is such and the other player thinks its such.

How can I pervent this from happening how can I put it past myself mentally?

DeShaun
01-22-2012, 12:42 PM
My biggest weakness in tennis is my mental game. Its not so much what the other player can do on the court that affects my mental game. I do fine mentally no matter if iam playing bad, the other player gets lucky shots, pushes, or anything else you can imagine. It does not bother me, I stay positive.

Of course I dont like losing like im sure no one here does, but I can handle it mentally.

WHAT I CANT HANDLE IS. Bad calls ( calls I see in and the other person sees out) and score disputes.

Score disputes are my number one pet peeve. I go beserk when I think the score is such and the other player thinks its such.

How can I pervent this from happening how can I put it past myself mentally?

Practice silencing your emotions. Those intense feeling that are stirred by the little things that will happen every day, by things that are not tennis-related and happen to everyone. As you gain practice, this ability to stay detached or to detach on command will become a transferable skill that can serve you on the tennis court. Though not perhaps a sexy sounding fix or suggestion, breathing deeply and slowly seems to be very important to this end.

5263
01-22-2012, 12:44 PM
Another big reason I teach not to hit near the lines. Hitting near the lines invites mistaken and/or cheating calls.
It hurts sooo bad to nail your target, deep in the corner and on the line,
only to be robbed and have it called out.
If you were not hitting for that, it stings quite a bit less knowing that is not what you meant anyway (still stings though, lol, but you realize how you played into it)

Most often I call the balls out when hit on or real near the lines by my students. Lets then know what will often happen and prepares them mentally to deal with it. I do make it clear that is not how to call against their opponents and that I'm training them to a higher standard.

If you nail one on your target, 2 feet from any line, then you are not likely to be cheated on that one. This ball is just as good with less risk. You also won't miss as much with better targets, which helps you feel better too, and you can control that much more than the calls of the Opp.

Ducker
01-22-2012, 01:34 PM
Gosh this is such good advice, thank you.


Another big reason I teach not to hit near the lines. Hitting near the lines invites mistaken and/or cheating calls.
It hurts sooo bad to nail your target, deep in the corner and on the line,
only to be robbed and have it called out.
If you were not hitting for that, it stings quite a bit less knowing that is not what you meant anyway (still stings though, lol, but you realize how you played into it)

Most often I call the balls out when hit on or real near the lines by my students. Lets then know what will often happen and prepares them mentally to deal with it. I do make it clear that is not how to call against their opponents and that I'm training them to a higher standard.

If you nail one on your target, 2 feet from any line, then you are not likely to be cheated on that one. This ball is just as good with less risk. You also won't miss as much with better targets, which helps you feel better too, and you can control that much more than the calls of the Opp.

kiteboard
01-22-2012, 01:42 PM
Decide not to be emotional about it anymore, or feel cheated, robbed, ruined, angry about the cheap crappy cheating lying bad faith in your face rotten piece of crap guy who does it. Lying and cheating go hand in hand, and the guys who do cheat the most are just another low quality person with a stick in his hand, and a smirk on his face. It's just like showing angry emotion during a match or frustration during a set, smashing frames, yelling outbursts, only help your opponent's underlying mind take credit for beating you to a frustrated state of mind, and he will take confidence from it, at your own cost even worst than the bad calls do.

Bagumbawalla
01-22-2012, 01:54 PM
In a "friendly" game the best to deal with possibly bad calls is to just not care and to continue to play your game.

In a tournament match, if you suspect bad calls, you can do several things- ask the opponent to point to excatly where he says the ball was out- then look for a mark there and keep him on his toes. Remind him of the definition of an out ball. If the perceived violation continues, ask for an official to monitor the match (if available). Have friends/bystanders watch and document his bad calls. A person being closely watched is less likely to be dishonest.

Sometimes, however, you just have to accept that line calling is not always perfect. Trained lines people make mistakes.

5263
01-22-2012, 01:59 PM
Sometimes, however, you just have to accept that line calling is not always perfect. Trained lines people make mistakes.

Very important point.

charliefedererer
01-22-2012, 08:36 PM
My biggest weakness in tennis is my mental game. Its not so much what the other player can do on the court that affects my mental game. I do fine mentally no matter if iam playing bad, the other player gets lucky shots, pushes, or anything else you can imagine. It does not bother me, I stay positive.

Of course I dont like losing like im sure no one here does, but I can handle it mentally.

WHAT I CANT HANDLE IS. Bad calls ( calls I see in and the other person sees out) and score disputes.

Score disputes are my number one pet peeve. I go beserk when I think the score is such and the other player thinks its such.

How can I pervent this from happening how can I put it past myself mentally?

Always call out the score each and every time you serve.
(There. Now there won't be any dispute for at least half the games - the ones you are serving.)


By calling out the score before each time you serve, you are also demonstrating that you are the expert on keeping score.

If your opponent isn't calling out the score before he serves, then start saying the score out loud when you are receiving. (Don't shout it out in an annoying way.)

The next time there is a score dispute, point out that you always call out the score so there will not be any disputes. Since your opponent isn't calling out the score, how can he have any credibility that his score is right?




You can't concentrate on "Im not getting rattled about the score or a bad call." You can't concentrate on just avoiding something - you have to occupy your mind by concentrating on what you are going to do.

So your new habit has to be to concentrate on how you think the next point will start, and fully concentrating on the ball once it is in play.

That should be pretty easy for you when you are serving. You have to visualize your perfect toss, where you are serving (T or out wide), and what you will do with the likely return. [eg. if serving out wide to the deuce court, anticipate hitting the return to the open court].
After visualizing this sequence in your head, step to the line and make it happen.

For returns, you 've got to visualize coming out of a split step, tracking the ball, and where you want to hit the T/body/wide serve.
Then do it when the actual serve is hit.

While the ball is in play, concentrate on coming out of a split step every time your opponent hits the ball, tracking the ball, hitting it, and quickly recovering for the next shot.


If you take your tennis seriously, you should be concentrating so hard on preparing for the next point, then concentating throughout the point, that there will be no opportunity to dwell on the past that you can do nothing about.
Concentrate on the future until play starts and then the present during play.

10sLifer
01-22-2012, 10:40 PM
My biggest weakness in tennis is my mental game. Its not so much what the other player can do on the court that affects my mental game. I do fine mentally no matter if iam playing bad, the other player gets lucky shots, pushes, or anything else you can imagine. It does not bother me, I stay positive.

Of course I dont like losing like im sure no one here does, but I can handle it mentally.

WHAT I CANT HANDLE IS. Bad calls ( calls I see in and the other person sees out) and score disputes.

Score disputes are my number one pet peeve. I go beserk when I think the score is such and the other player thinks its such.

How can I pervent this from happening how can I put it past myself mentally?

You have a similar personality to myself. The trick is to de-personalize the game. Just get siked about improving every match and try to stay in the moment. You will meet many opponents who love the drama because they know it doesn't effect them but does effect you. Don't get pulled in. Just have fun! This mentallity of win at all cost only works on some people.

drkplayer122
01-22-2012, 11:50 PM
What I always do is that both players always keep score while the server says it out loud. There are those awkward times that both players forget an then you can just compromise the score like saying it 30-all if the server is going to serve on the deuce side.