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10s99
04-30-2004, 07:04 AM
I am a fairly new stringer and have used only a prince neos stringer. I am considering purchasing my own machine and find that the ones that make the most sense (in terms of $) are drop weight machines (alpha in particular) w/ fixed clamps.

I have read a lot about the need for the bar to get parallel to the ground and the inaccuracy in tension if it is not. I have never used a drop weight and it worries me to think that the quality of my stringing rests on me making what can only be a somewhat inaccurate call as to whether the bar is parallel. . .

Is this really a worry or is it easier than it sounds.

Thacks for any advice.

Rick Streeter
04-30-2004, 07:15 AM
10s99

You will get used to it. When I go on tournaments with my HS team I take a ATS Traveler to string on and I rarely have to even look at the bar to see if it is level. You get a feel and know just how far to raise the bar to get it to be parallel.

Rick

borisboris
04-30-2004, 07:32 AM
I agree w/ 10s. I began a month ago on an antiquated Dropper and the tension being horizontal is the least of your worries. You have the option to make the tension the exact same everytime you drop it by placing something at the 0 degree mark - but not so that the weight will rest on it.

Gaines Hillix
04-30-2004, 10:42 AM
You will get used to it, but it doesn't have to be exactly horizontal anyway. Studies were done and it was found that even an error of 10-15o would only make a 5% difference in tension.

10s99
04-30-2004, 10:51 AM
thanks for your replys. i feel that i'm overly concerned and am trying to figure out why.

5% of 60 is 3lbs which seems significant and is what worries me. is this a negligable amount?

Gaines Hillix
04-30-2004, 11:02 AM
10s99, that was just an example to illustrate it takes a large error to make a relatively small difference in tension. You are not likely to make a 15o error without noticing it.

rich s
04-30-2004, 11:51 AM
I agree with Gaines.

If you set your reference tension to 60lb and you are off by 10 degrees (above or below horizontal) you are still pulling 59lb of tension. See the table below.


Degrees From Horizontal.....Percent of Reference Tension.....Resulting Tension (60 lb Ref)
1.............................................99.9 8%...................................59.99
2.............................................99.9 4%...................................59.96
3.............................................99.8 6%...................................59.92
4.............................................99.7 6%...................................59.85
5.............................................99.6 2%...................................59.77
6.............................................99.4 5%...................................59.67
7.............................................99.2 5%...................................59.55
8.............................................99.0 3%...................................59.42
9.............................................98.7 7%...................................59.26
10...........................................98.48 %...................................59.09
11...........................................98.16 %...................................58.90
12...........................................97.81 %...................................58.69
13...........................................97.44 %...................................58.46
14...........................................97.03 %...................................58.22
15...........................................96.59 %...................................57.96

Once you get the hang of it you can get the bar to within 5 deg of horizontal without even trying.

Another option is to set you reference tension 1-2 lb higher than you want it to be to offset the tension reduction from being at angle other than perfectly horizontal.

Gaines Hillix
04-30-2004, 02:00 PM
Nice work, Rich! :-)

rich s
04-30-2004, 05:50 PM
:D