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Mikeflies
01-25-2012, 04:29 AM
How hard is it to shave a grip down a size. I was given a racket that is a 4 1/2 & I like 4 3/8. Any help would be nice. Thank you for your time & God Bless.

jorel
01-25-2012, 04:34 AM
beter to use one/two overgrips and make up the weight with lead

ala becker or nadal

hescobal
01-25-2012, 04:53 AM
beter to use one/two overgrips and make up the weight with lead

ala becker or nadal

That or either by a prince resithin replacement grip

li0scc0
01-25-2012, 05:19 AM
Take it to a professional shop who has done this at least a hundred times. I am pretty handy (been a bike mechanic, done metal fabrication, etc.) and screwed up the shaving of a handle the first few times I tried...and was quite careful. It is a bit of an art.

jorel
01-25-2012, 06:10 AM
and if u hit graphite....game over

jorel
01-25-2012, 08:15 AM
Take it to a professional shop who has done this at least a hundred times. I am pretty handy (been a bike mechanic, done metal fabrication, etc.) and screwed up the shaving of a handle the first few times I tried...and was quite careful. It is a bit of an art.
that might be a challenge..last time i took it to a shop to ask them to do it they told me to just buy another racquet..guess it is labor intensive and they didnot want to be bothered with it

roman at rpny might do it for you but i think it might cost a small fortune..might be cheaper just to sell the 4 1/2 and buy a 4 3/8

but if you want pro quality work roman at rpny is the place to go

zcarzach
01-25-2012, 09:11 AM
You could probably do a passable job with a smooth cut rasp and a vise to hold the frame. Just hold the handle of the rasp in your right hand, the point in your left hand, angle the tip towards you and pull it back, keeping it flat on the bevel. Try to use as much of the rasp as possible, making one pass on each bevel, test the size, and then repeat as necessary, always one even stroke per bevel. I make furniture by hand for a living and this is probably how I would do it.

catfish
01-25-2012, 10:47 AM
You could probably do a passable job with a smooth cut rasp and a vise to hold the frame. Just hold the handle of the rasp in your right hand, the point in your left hand, angle the tip towards you and pull it back, keeping it flat on the bevel. Try to use as much of the rasp as possible, making one pass on each bevel, test the size, and then repeat as necessary, always one even stroke per bevel. I make furniture by hand for a living and this is probably how I would do it.

My husband has shaved down a couple of Yonex grips for me and I think he did it as you describe. He got the grip size down slightly from 4 3/8 to a little over 4 1/4. Then he put a 4 1/4 butt cap on the racquets and they played fine. The bevels were harder to feel, but that didn't bother me.

BTW, my husband is a woodworker and has made quite a bit of furniture.

user92626
01-25-2012, 11:53 AM
I'm not picky so it was very easy for me. To boot, the end result was even better than I expected -- smaller and more comfortable than before.

I used a wood file (or filer?) and carefully filed away all 8 sharp edges. It wasn't enough to make the handle feeling round at all but it was more than enough to reduce 1+ size. Then, with two overgrips on, it feels so comfortable.

scotus
01-25-2012, 12:00 PM
I'm not picky so it was very easy for me. To boot, the end result was even better than I expected -- smaller and more comfortable than before.

I used a wood file (or filer?) and carefully filed away all 8 sharp edges. It wasn't enough to make the handle feeling round at all but it was more than enough to reduce 1+ size. Then, with two overgrips on, it feels so comfortable.

Most people want the sharp bevel edges because that's how they can tell which grip they are using, but if it feels fine to you, that's all that matters (unless you sell the racquet to someone in the future without disclosing that information beforehand. Then expect the buyer to be furious).

user92626
01-25-2012, 12:14 PM
Most people want the sharp bevel edges because that's how they can tell which grip they are using, but if it feels fine to you, that's all that matters (unless you sell the racquet to someone in the future without disclosing that information beforehand. Then expect the buyer to be furious).

I know what you mean, but like I implied above, having more than 2 overgrips on would make any original bevel edges feel round already. In fact I always use Bab replacement grips and they always compress quickly and expose the sharp edges. If I didn't already get my "true" size or have an inkling that I might sell later, I would shave all rackets handles.

I've only sold a few rackets and never any one that's been permanently modified. This particular pdgt is a keeper since it was also reduced from 27.5 and was quite banged up cosmetically when I got it.

Customization or tweaking your main racket bit by bit to fit you is really amazing. Over time the racket feels like it's an extension of your arm, so comfortable and so fluid. :)

LeeD
01-25-2012, 03:13 PM
I've shaved a couple of handles from 5/8 to just under 1/2 sizing, using a vice as recommended and a short power planer set at very low settings. The 8 corners stayed sharp, but a precise drop in grip size is hard to achieve.
Then again, I'd already made fairing molds for Yamaha and Kawasaki, and shaped over 450 surfboards.
My take. Play with the stock handle, use the thinnest grip you can find.

lgbalfa
01-25-2012, 08:44 PM
i had this done by RPNY in NYC.

they charged me about $60 from what i remember.

i did not want to risk ruining the racquets by doing it myself.

jorel
01-26-2012, 05:17 AM
i had this done by RPNY in NYC.

they charged me about $60 from what i remember.

i did not want to risk ruining the racquets by doing it myself.
for that price,,, if you sell the racquet u have now for about 60 dollars...

you can buy a new 120 dollar racquet and only pay 60 dollars net

rufusbgood
01-27-2012, 01:35 PM
There plenty of folks who will reduce a urethane foam handle with hand tools. It's even taught that way at the GSS Symposium. I have never tried it and I think it's bad idea. The correct tool for this job is a milling machine. First time someone asked me to do this I went out and did my best to put together a rudimentary milling machine. I bought a drill press, a cross sliding vise, a flat end rotary file and a dial caliper. The bevel edges end up sharper than a new racquet when I'm finished. It's a lot of work and I undercharge for it. I consider it part of customer retention.

counterpuncher
01-29-2012, 06:55 PM
It can be done, but you need to be a patient and cautious. After failing at my first attempt, I took someone's suggested technique here and have used it half a dozen times with success.

All you need is a marker (sharpie, etc..), a vice, a sanding block, some not too coarse sand paper and a smaller replacement butt cap.

1. Remove the grip and butt cap
2. Color in all bevels of the urethane handle with the marker
3. With the racquet in the vice, sand one bevel down at a time until the marker color has worn away.
4. After each side has been done, check the to see if the smaller but cap now fits on. If not repeat from Step 2, otherwise you are done.

I found it to be a great simple method, for ensuring even sanding on all bevels, with a minimum of tools. It usually takes about 10 - 20 minutes with the key being, taking your time, checking and double checking.

Virtua Tennis
01-30-2012, 10:04 AM
The best thing to use to reduce it a size is Babolat skin grip.

AR15
01-30-2012, 02:05 PM
It's not difficult at all. Just takes a little patience.

I use a sanding block, or a wood block with medium/course sandpaper. Take your time and sand each bevel lengthwise. Take a measurement with a measuring tape before you start, and occasionally during the process till you get to the measurement you desire.

It isn't rocket science.