PDA

View Full Version : Running cross court forehand


thug the bunny
01-27-2012, 12:09 PM
This is one of the last shots I need to clean up. Running out wide to the forehand, and because of the great angle, I often want to put it CC to the serviceline - sideline area. I can usually pull it off more or less, but when I miss it is ALWAYS low into the net. I don't have the same problem putting it back in the middle or DTL, or if I'm not running to the ball. Oh, and I am always trying to hit my normal SW TS forehand.

What are the special considerations for this shot, and how can I adjust to get the ball up more?

wings56
01-27-2012, 12:22 PM
probably need a video to make an accurate suggestion if possible.

LeeD
01-27-2012, 03:54 PM
Sharper the CC angle, the more closed your body is. The more you close your body, the LOWER your ball will go.

LeeD
01-27-2012, 03:55 PM
I posted, it got lost.
The more you CC your shot, the more closed your body is.
The more closed your body is, the lower your shot unless you compensate by hitting higher.

BevelDevil
01-27-2012, 09:23 PM
Typically, players hit with a wrist "flick" and finish high. For example, Pete Sampras hit his normal forehand with a stiff wrist. But when he hit on the run he hit with a lot a wrist flick and finished with a Nadal-like reverse. (check out some old pete videos)

Because your body is closed, you can't generate the same power. Thus, you must compensate by using a flicking motion, and by aiming higher. Btw, Pete Sampras changed his grip slightly towards more continental when he hit the running fh. Not required, but something to consider.

goran_ace
01-28-2012, 10:18 AM
If you've got every other shot in the book and this is the only one you've yet to master then you are in pretty good shape :) This is one of the tougher shots to hit in tennis because your momentum is carrying you in the opposite direction and you also need to get the ball to dip in a hurry after crossing the net to stay in. If I'm your opponent and I see you extended like that I'm coming in and shading heavily towards the down the line; I dare you to make that shot.

Your shot is going into the bottom of the net because when running hard laterally the position/direction your body is facing and your momentum aren't doing you any favors. The temptation is to hit harder to compensate, but it's difficult to get that ball to sit down if you flatten out. In this situation, I'm looking to come around the outside of that ball and hit either a rolling forehand or the aforementioned wrist flick, depending on how much incoming pace is left on that ball. To get the short angle I want that ball on its descending path before it crosses the net (i.e. get it to peak on your side of the net like you would with a drop shot). It may look hard/fast, but you have to keep in mind it's more of a finesse shot than a power shot.

thug the bunny
01-30-2012, 07:43 AM
Thanks guys. I am going to try incorporating more wrist release into this shot. Just thinking about it, I can tell that timing will be critical in not giving away the wrist angle too soon. Can't wait to play..

LeeD
01-30-2012, 10:31 AM
Instead of wrist, I'd concentrate on the higher than normal followthru, up to and including the reverse followthru.
Wrist is not consistent, when you need it.
Followthru is what determines a good shot, working backwards, it determines your swingpath and prep.

thug the bunny
01-30-2012, 10:38 AM
The reverese followthru is the one that finishes over the head as opposed to over the left shoulder?

LeeD
01-30-2012, 10:41 AM
Yes, high followthru forces the steeper low to high swingpath, so you clear the net.

thug the bunny
01-30-2012, 10:45 AM
I will try that as well. Thanks Lee.

thug the bunny
02-02-2012, 11:35 AM
Played two sets today. Tried executing the reverse follow thru on these shots but found that it's hard to do when I'm stretched out. Still dumped a bunch into the net. Gonna try using the wrist to get around to the outside of the ball next time around..

Larrysümmers
02-02-2012, 12:17 PM
i find that the key, for me, is to get low. the lower i get on the ball, the more up my follow through is. resulting in a ball with a lot of topspin and depth.

BevelDevil
02-02-2012, 03:11 PM
Footwork is key to being about to get a full swing with power. Assuming you're right handed, you should initiate your forward swing just as your right foot is hits the ground.

So the ideal pattern goes:

1. Right foot plant and forward swing, pushing off right leg for power.
2. hit the ball with loose wrist (forearm pronating) and upwards brush
3. left foot lands and follow through.

You should try to use your planted right leg to propel your hips and shoulder into the swing as much as you can. You wont be able to turn as much as in a normal swing because of your left leg blocking your body.

This takes a lot of practice and timing, similar to the right-foot timing of a 1hbh. You really need to target where your right foot is going to plant because you are taking a whacking the ball an instant after.

You can practice this at home. Set up a target in your garage and practice lunging at it: Right foot plant, hit, left foot lands.


I also recommend you not fixate too much on the reverse follow through. It will happen on its own if you swing correctly. Sometimes the racket handle will not go around your head, it will just go up above your right shoulder.

achokshi99
02-02-2012, 03:48 PM
If you are consistently putting it in the net, the issue may be you don't have the power to make this a good shot in a match. If you are running hard out wide to your forehand side where you are pulled off the court, you can do a lot more damage potentially by going DTL. Pace and penetration is a lot more important to winning that point as opposed to a cross court weak shot.

Another thing is you'd want to flatten that shot out because you will probably get a loopy, great angle, but also a lower powered shot that is potentially easily covered/anticipated shot by your opponent. I am envisioning when you are in a position to hit a crosscourt on the run FH, it's very likely a good player is going to already position him/herself to be neutral on the court or be coming to the net. If you hit a weaker cross court FH the opponent will close out the shot with a drop shot or just put it away. My 2cents says I'd rather take a shot going DTL with the best pace/heat on the ball that is more of a challenge for your opponent to hit.

But to still develop that shot, I think you need to flatten the FH out when you are going for the cross court shot. I have a heavy TS forehand like you as well and I use an open stance, as I suspect you do for your normal, solid fh shots. The problem with type of stroke setup is our power is generated by waist and shoulder torque. When you are on the run, you just need a ton of "replacement" power for not being in that stance so I'd look to get some extra oomph from a flatter shot/wrist position. Remember your bodys momentum is pulling you away from the court and also diminishing the power you have.

Another thing is timing, hard to do but you need to strike the ball as early as possible meaning you need to get that racquet accelerating earlier than you think.

This is one of the last shots I need to clean up. Running out wide to the forehand, and because of the great angle, I often want to put it CC to the serviceline - sideline area. I can usually pull it off more or less, but when I miss it is ALWAYS low into the net. I don't have the same problem putting it back in the middle or DTL, or if I'm not running to the ball. Oh, and I am always trying to hit my normal SW TS forehand.

What are the special considerations for this shot, and how can I adjust to get the ball up more?

LeeD
02-02-2012, 04:06 PM
Just why not.... AIM HIGHER.
At least you're not hitting the net AND hitting long. I already told you WHY you tend to hit low, now hit higher.

goran_ace
02-03-2012, 06:57 AM
Another thing is you'd want to flatten that shot out because you will probably get a loopy, great angle, but also a lower powered shot that is potentially easily covered/anticipated shot by your opponent. I am envisioning when you are in a position to hit a crosscourt on the run FH, it's very likely a good player is going to already position him/herself to be neutral on the court or be coming to the net. If you hit a weaker cross court FH the opponent will close out the shot with a drop shot or just put it away. My 2cents says I'd rather take a shot going DTL with the best pace/heat on the ball that is more of a challenge for your opponent to hit.

I agree with you that going down the line is the better shot, but if he wants to take it cross court on a short angle flattening out isn't the way to do it. This is a discussion about shot shaping not shot selection. Deep cross court yeah go flatter, but OP wants to go at the sideline T. There's just not a lot of court to work with. Gotta get the ball to sit down almost immediately after crossing the net. Getting around the outside of the ball gets him the angle, topspin and an apex on his side of net is what gets that to dip in a hurry to land in the court.

It's not easy to do. It's not just about aiming at a spot on the court, the OP needs to shape that shot in just the right way. Too much spin, not enough height, or peaking too early puts it in the net. Not enough spin, too much height, or peaking too late the net pushes the shot wide. Not enough angle gives the opponent an easy put away into the open court behind him.

thug the bunny
02-03-2012, 10:20 AM
I agree DTL when pulled wide is a good choice, and I don't normally have problems with that shot. I just want that CC shot available for variety and if my opp comes in shading DTL.

Thanks again all for the input, and I have some ideas to work on for now..