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lgbalfa
01-27-2012, 12:37 PM
when you are looking at specs for new racquets, for someone who likes to volley, is it normally better to get a head light racquet for better maneuverability then a racquet that is even balanced?

mikeler
01-27-2012, 01:19 PM
Head light is great for volleying.

retrograde
01-27-2012, 01:25 PM
when you are looking at specs for new racquets, for someone who likes to volley, is it normally better to get a head light racquet for better maneuverability then a racquet that is even balanced?
I play a lot of doubles so volleying is important to me. As the static weight of the racquet goes up, it becomes more important to have a head-light balance to maintain maneuverability. With lighter sticks, you can get by with more even balances and still have some maneuverability.

In fact, if you plot weight and balance for any manufacturer's lineup, you'll typically see that trend. For example, see this post:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=6275627&postcount=12

Personally, I prefer to go with the heaviest stick I can handle with a head-light balance. My current doubles stick is a PK7g at 11.8oz and 9-pt HL. I get a little mass to help with volleying, especially when below the net, yet the balance makes the racquet maneuverable.

A friend recently demo'd a bunch of Head Radicals (LM, MG, YT). They are relatively light with more even balances. Even though I was able to whip those racquets around to easily generate spin, I personally didn't think they volleyed that solidly.

Captain Tezuka
01-27-2012, 01:27 PM
I play a lot of doubles so volleying is important to me. As the static weight of the racquet goes up, it becomes more important to have a head-light balance to maintain maneuverability. With lighter sticks, you can get by with more even balances and still have some maneuverability.

In fact, if you plot weight and balance for any manufacturer's lineup, you'll typically see that trend. For example, see this post:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=6275627&postcount=12

Personally, I prefer to go with the heaviest stick I can handle with a head-light balance. My current doubles stick is a PK7g at 11.8oz and 9-pt HL.

A friend recently demo'd a bunch of Head Radicals (LM, MG, YT). They are relatively light with more even balances. Even though I was able to whip those racquets around to easily generate spin, I personally didn't think they volleyed that solidly.

Thanks this will help me as I'm more of a net rusher in singles and ofc everyone who plays doubles will undoubtably volley at some point.

-Tezuka

lgbalfa
01-27-2012, 01:41 PM
my current stick is at 11.4, 3 points headlight.

i know that to make it more headlight, i would have to put weights in the handle.

is it possible for me to make the racquet more like 5-6 points headlight but without increasing the static weight significantly?

thanks

retrograde
01-27-2012, 02:11 PM
To find out how much lead you'd need to add and where, you can use TW's customization tool here:

http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/customization.php

The tool wants the balance point expressed as a length measured from the butt. You can covert from points to length by dividing the length of your racquet in half (e.g. 27/2 = 13.5) then subtracting by # points x 1/8".

In the tool, if you don't add enough weight, it will tell you a solution is not possible, so just bump up the weight until it gives you a solution. To minimize weight added, try to get the tool to add the least amount of weight closest to the butt end.

I don't have any racquets setup this way, so can't say whether it will feel the same as a stock racquet with the same specs (because the lead added isn't spread out throughout the frame). Have fun.

LeeD
01-27-2012, 04:16 PM
I can play 4.5 level doubles if the 3 other guys are 4.5's.
Went from 12 to 10 oz rackets (SW from 340 to 310), and it's about the same. Always gotta compensate for a different racket, so learning and reacting is needed.
My lighter racket is stiffer, bigger, has livelier strings, so that makes up some difference. And I know to stroke thru more on tough shots, to make up for the lighter mass.
EVERY shot need a little adjustment, so it's not purely the weight, but also YOUR ability to compensate and adjust.

BobFL
01-27-2012, 04:17 PM
when you are looking at specs for new racquets, for someone who likes to volley, is it normally better to get a head light racquet for better maneuverability then a racquet that is even balanced?

Absolutely. Nenad Zimonjic, for example, has his racquet specced at 13.6oz but 12-14 points HL...

LeeD
01-27-2012, 04:18 PM
Oh, my 340 racket is maybe 6 pts headlight while my new 300 racket is close to evenly balanced. SW not as different as the specs show.