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Anton
01-28-2012, 04:59 PM
Hit with 300G today and was pretty surprised by the stable feel, big sweetspot and uniform stringbed response, which is not what I associate with 300s.

Strung with what looked like Duralast at mid tension the impact feel of 300G was pretty raw compared to it's offspring, but the results were awesome at least for the 20 min or so that I hit with it. I got great ball lift, spin and drive with can-do-no-wrong consistency.

Is this a fluke or does anyone else out there like 300G over the 300's later iterations?

fattsoo
01-28-2012, 05:22 PM
Hit with 300G today and was pretty surprised by the stable feel, big sweetspot and uniform stringbed response, which is not what I associate with 300s.

Strung with what looked like Duralast at mid tension the impact feel of 300G was pretty raw compared to it's offspring, but the results were awesome at least for the 20 min or so that I hit with it. I got great ball lift, spin and drive with can-do-no-wrong consistency.

Is this a fluke or does anyone else out there like 300G over the 300's later iterations?

I love the 300g...still have 2 for my collection (after selling 4 to my friend)...the 300g compared to the later 300 series is a very well rounded racquet. It is quick at the net and very light for such a stable racquet. Off-center hits is not punished like the m-fil 300.
With the low weight of the 300g, it leaves a lot of room for customization with lead weight. I espeacially love the fact that it is not picky with strings...I can throw any type of strings at it and it will perform exceptionally well.
Now it got me itching to go back to the racquet and give it a hit again.

AndrewD
01-28-2012, 07:43 PM
Is this a fluke or does anyone else out there like 300G over the 300's later iterations?

Not just the 300G; I feel that the Hotmelt 100G and 200G are both quite a lot better than the versions which followed them.

Anton
01-28-2012, 08:15 PM
Does anyone know what is the difference between regular 300G and 300G Tour Specification?

Anton
01-29-2012, 07:30 AM
Poll added!

Mig1NC
01-30-2012, 02:08 PM
The 300G is one of those racquets that I regret selling :(

Anton
01-31-2012, 04:40 AM
Tennis.com biomimetic 300 review

Fernando Verdasco plays with a customized version of the 300, and if you can find the sweet spot consistently, it can unleash the inner Spanish shotmaker lurking within. Groundstrokes, when struck correctly, penetrate the court with depth. The racquet’s rapier-sharp potential was also evident on swing and drive volleys. However, some testers said it was slightly too light (10.22 oz. unstrung and 10.75 oz. strung) to nullify big hitters during blistering baseline exchanges.

Likes: Whether you drive a flat ball or prefer whipping titanic topspin, if you hit the ball cleanly you’ll be rewarded by the Biomimetic 300. The aggressive red-and-black color scheme and distinctive Aeroskin surface—designed to make the racquet more aerodynamically adept—highlight cutting-edge cosmetics that make a striking statement.

Dislikes: Weight and response were issues for some play-testers. (For them, the heavier Biomimetic 300 Tour, Jurgen Melzer’s frame, is a better option.) Some reported a smaller sweet spot and stiffer feel than its classic ancestor, the classic Dunlop 300G, which earned a cult following for its flexibility and feel.

Bottom Line: This racquet rewards the accurate ball striker. It won’t help the lighter hitter pack a more potent punch, but if you’ve got a good, reliable swing and the ambition to play all-court tennis, you may find a partner in the 300.

http://www.tennis.com/gear/racquet_review.aspx?id=536

Pneumated1
01-31-2012, 06:29 AM
Tennis.com biomimetic 300 review

Fernando Verdasco plays with a customized version of the 300, and if you can find the sweet spot consistently, it can unleash the inner Spanish shotmaker lurking within. Groundstrokes, when struck correctly, penetrate the court with depth. The racquet’s rapier-sharp potential was also evident on swing and drive volleys. However, some testers said it was slightly too light (10.22 oz. unstrung and 10.75 oz. strung) to nullify big hitters during blistering baseline exchanges.

Likes: Whether you drive a flat ball or prefer whipping titanic topspin, if you hit the ball cleanly you’ll be rewarded by the Biomimetic 300. The aggressive red-and-black color scheme and distinctive Aeroskin surface—designed to make the racquet more aerodynamically adept—highlight cutting-edge cosmetics that make a striking statement.

Dislikes: Weight and response were issues for some play-testers. (For them, the heavier Biomimetic 300 Tour, Jurgen Melzer’s frame, is a better option.) Some reported a smaller sweet spot and stiffer feel than its classic ancestor, the classic Dunlop 300G, which earned a cult following for its flexibility and feel.

Bottom Line: This racquet rewards the accurate ball striker. It won’t help the lighter hitter pack a more potent punch, but if you’ve got a good, reliable swing and the ambition to play all-court tennis, you may find a partner in the 300.

http://www.tennis.com/gear/racquet_review.aspx?id=536

I started tennis with and hit a customized (+1oz) 300G for almost five years. Honestly, I cannot give a good reason for switching other than buying into the nonsensical notion that new racquets are better. Anyway, I held out until the 4D introduction and went to the Tour, before going to the London. Unfortunately, just last year I sold two in very good condition and one with plastic still on the handle. I have to admit that I haven't been completely satisfied with anything I've hit since leaving the 300G. And I was completely satisfied with the 300G, but I realized this in hindsight. I should have bought about ten frames when they were cheap and never looked back.

The Bio. 300, as you may know, is from the same mold as the HM 300G, but the different layup gives a different response; however, it's the closest thing to the old 300G that I've found. However, the 300G just had a perfect stiffness/flex ratio with the kevlar yoke, and if I remember correctly, kevlar in the upper hoop, offset by the HM carbon on the sides of the hoop. Almost the perfect blend of control/precision/pop/feel.

I'm waiting for the rumored Bio. McEnroe 300 that is supposed to be available to the US public this year. If not, I may weight up a Bio. 300 and see if I can capture the old magic with the Dunlop 300.

Anton
01-31-2012, 11:16 AM
I started tennis with and hit a customized (+1oz) 300G for almost five years. Honestly, I cannot give a good reason for switching other than buying into the nonsensical notion that new racquets are better. Anyway, I held out until the 4D introduction and went to the Tour, before going to the London. Unfortunately, just last year I sold two in very good condition and one with plastic still on the handle. I have to admit that I haven't been completely satisfied with anything I've hit since leaving the 300G. And I was completely satisfied with the 300G, but I realized this in hindsight. I should have bought about ten frames when they were cheap and never looked back.

The Bio. 300, as you may know, is from the same mold as the HM 300G, but the different layup gives a different response; however, it's the closest thing to the old 300G that I've found. However, the 300G just had a perfect stiffness/flex ratio with the kevlar yoke, and if I remember correctly, kevlar in the upper hoop, offset by the HM carbon on the sides of the hoop. Almost the perfect blend of control/precision/pop/feel.

I'm waiting for the rumored Bio. McEnroe 300 that is supposed to be available to the US public this year. If not, I may weight up a Bio. 300 and see if I can capture the old magic with the Dunlop 300.

I have 2 brand new 300Gs and one slightly used 300 on their way to me for an old-school VS latatest-n-greatest showdown. :twisted:

Pneumated1
01-31-2012, 03:28 PM
I have 2 brand new 300Gs and one slightly used 300 on their way to me for an old-school VS latatest-n-greatest showdown. :twisted:

I saw two brand new 300G's (4 1/2) just recently on a site that I can't mention by name, and before I could make a bid, the auction disappeared. You wouldn't have happened to have swiped those up would you?:)

Please do me a favor and give me the option of taking the 300G's off your hands if you go in another direction. And I sincerely mean that. You can contact me through the site here.

And you may know this, but I wouldn't make any decisions about any Dunlop 300 without lots of lead and leather.

Anton
01-31-2012, 06:01 PM
I saw two brand new 300G's (4 1/2) just recently on a site that I can't mention by name, and before I could make a bid, the auction disappeared. You wouldn't have happened to have swiped those up would you?:)

Please do me a favor and give me the option of taking the 300G's off your hands if you go in another direction. And I sincerely mean that. You can contact me through the site here.

And you may know this, but I wouldn't make any decisions about any Dunlop 300 without lots of lead and leather.

Yep I took em. They were actually different grip sizes - one was 3/8 and another was 4 1/2. I usually use 3/8 nowadays but Dunlop grips are a bit smaller, so I liked the idea of trying 4 1/2, but will probably just sell 1/2 (to you) without using it.

And yes I do plan to play with weight to get the most out of both 300 and 300G.

Maybe you can give me opinion on the strings - I'll be playing (A LOT :twisted:) in humid 80 degrees weather, the plan so far is to string with 16g Hyperion (soft poly) at 58 lbs.

NicoHK
01-31-2012, 11:21 PM
I have been playing for 5 years with a 300G with lead at 3 and 9 plus a bit in the handle and this is an amazing stick (even in stock form but miss a bit of stability). I still have two, not in very good condition as they have played a lot but when I sometimes hit with them, it is just a great feeling! Hitting flat (more what I am doing) or even adding some spin especially in my 1HBH or for sliced shots this racquet does everything well. Only weakpoint to me, the serve that I had difficulties with. To what I remember, it is particularly good to lower the tension for the cross compared to the main.

IMO, the Bio300 is the closest to the 300G (I assume due to the same mold), much closer than the 4D 300 that I have used for one and half year (after using a AG 300). But when I gave the Bio 300 a demo, I found it was too stiff and finally moved to the Head Speed 300 (who said I have been linked with 300?) a year ago.

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/D300G/D300GReview.html

Pneumated1
02-01-2012, 06:07 AM
Yep I took em. They were actually different grip sizes - one was 3/8 and another was 4 1/2. I usually use 3/8 nowadays but Dunlop grips are a bit smaller, so I liked the idea of trying 4 1/2, but will probably just sell 1/2 (to you) without using it.

And yes I do plan to play with weight to get the most out of both 300 and 300G.

Maybe you can give me opinion on the strings - I'll be playing (A LOT :twisted:) in humid 80 degrees weather, the plan so far is to string with 16g Hyperion (soft poly) at 58 lbs.

I quit hitting the frame in the Spring of 08, so it's been awhile. I personally preferred a full multi or syn. gut, but I did use poly's with good success. My polys of choice these days are CyberBlue and V-Pro, but I can't vouch for their playability in the 300G. I do remember that BB Original Rough blew me away in a full bed at around 55-58 lbs. Luxilon used to also offer a hybrid of BB Alu Power and Supersense, which worked very well in the 300G. I also used a full bed of Timo 17 once, and that worked as well.:) As another poster mentioned, I found that this frame performed well with any string.

And keep us informed as to your thoughts of the comparison with the Bio. I didn't find the Bio. stiff, but I played it in the heart of Summer. I thought it was reminiscent of the 300G, which I always thought played stiffer than its listed 63 stiffness.

And yeah, I'd probably take that 4 1/2. Just let me know. Thanks.

Pneumated1
02-01-2012, 07:37 AM
I have been playing for 5 years with a 300G with lead at 3 and 9 plus a bit in the handle and this is an amazing stick (even in stock form but miss a bit of stability). I still have two, not in very good condition as they have played a lot but when I sometimes hit with them, it is just a great feeling! Hitting flat (more what I am doing) or even adding some spin especially in my 1HBH or for sliced shots this racquet does everything well. Only weakpoint to me, the serve that I had difficulties with. To what I remember, it is particularly good to lower the tension for the cross compared to the main.

IMO, the Bio300 is the closest to the 300G (I assume due to the same mold), much closer than the 4D 300 that I have used for one and half year (after using a AG 300). But when I gave the Bio 300 a demo, I found it was too stiff and finally moved to the Head Speed 300 (who said I have been linked with 300?) a year ago.

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/D300G/D300GReview.html

The Bio. 300 excluded, which 300 did you prefer since the 300G? I ask because I skipped the M-Fil altogether, and almost went with the AG 300 but couldn't justify it with four usable 300G's in my bag. I never hit the 4D 300 but did hit the 4D 300 Tour for two years, but it was an anemic racquet, even with lead.

The 4D 300 seems to have maintained a familiar head shape and string pattern, but the throat and shoulders were somewhat foreign, if I remember correctly. However, the 4D technology supposedly strengthened the throat and shoulders a bit in the layup with a thinner beam, so I guess in theory things should even out. The response was definitely more modern, but I'm somewhat used to that by now, having hit the 300 Tour for two years and the BB London for one. The Bio. was in my vague perception a combination of the former HM tendencies (read frame shape) and modern layup.

Just curious of your thoughts on this. Thanks.

ghia
02-01-2012, 08:27 AM
What are the specs of the 300G, strung or unstrung? I just foud some new ones and I am not sure about the correct specs.
Thanks!

Pneumated1
02-01-2012, 11:00 AM
What are the specs of the 300G, strung or unstrung? I just foud some new ones and I am not sure about the correct specs.
Thanks!

10.8 strung, 300 swingweight, 4pts. headlight, 21.5 mm beam width (pretty sure it wasn't 21 mm). Hope this helps.

ghia
02-01-2012, 11:14 AM
Thanks!
The store I found it at lists it at 290 strung and 21 mm beam.
I guess they confused the strung weight for the unstrung one, but I am still confused with the beam width. This are the TW specs :confused:
Dunlop 300G 98 Racquets


Price: 129.99





Players looking for a unique mix of traditional feel and control in a maneuverable, lightweight package should consider the Dunlop 300G. It fills an important niche for Dunlop, aimed at players who want the control of a player’s model without the bulk. The 300G has many elements of the now discontinued Muscle Weave 200G 100 but is different enough to stand alone, including a more open string pattern and 27-inch standard length. The straight beam design and 98 square-inch head size promote a solid feel, despite its sub-11 ounce weight. Used by ATP professional, James Blake.



Pros Using This Racquet
James Blake Amelie Mauresmo






Midplus Specs
Head Size:
98 sq. in. / 632 sq. cm.
Length: 27 inches / 69 cm
Strung Weight: 10.8oz / 306g
Balance: 4pts Head Light
Swingweight: 300
Stiffness: 64
Beam Width: 21.5 mm Straight Beam
Composition: Hot Melt Braided Graphite w/Elastomer/Kevlar Yoke
Power Level: Low-Medium
Swing Speed: Fast
Grip Type: Hydramax Tour
String Pattern:
16 Mains / 19 Crosses
Mains skip: 8T,8H
One Piece
No shared holes
String Tension: 55-65 pounds

Anton
02-01-2012, 11:19 AM
Length 27 inches 69 centimeters
Head Size 98 square inches 632 square centimeters
Weight 10.8 ounces 306 grams

Balance Point 4pts Head Light

Construction 21.5 mm Straight Beam

Composition
Hot Melt Braided Graphite
with Elastomer/Kevlar Yoke

String Pattern 16 Mains / 19 Crosses

Babolat RDC Ratings
Flex Rating 64
Swing Weight 300


Btw here is the review from TW, with jsut about all scores in the 70's

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/D300G/D300GPlaytest.GIF
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/D300G/D300GReview.html

Bio 300 review:

http://img.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/db3h.gif

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/DB3H/DB3HReview.html


Heavy Inflation?

ghia
02-01-2012, 11:35 AM
It seems that all new racquets score well above 80% in all the test cathegories:oops:.
They gotta sell them, right !

Herdsman76
02-01-2012, 02:44 PM
Too bad the original Max 300i wasn't included in the poll. That was my stick when I played collegiate tennis....

Cheers!

NicoHK
02-02-2012, 07:43 AM
Sorry, wrong manip.

NicoHK
02-02-2012, 07:56 AM
The Bio. 300 excluded, which 300 did you prefer since the 300G? I ask because I skipped the M-Fil altogether, and almost went with the AG 300 but couldn't justify it with four usable 300G's in my bag. I never hit the 4D 300 but did hit the 4D 300 Tour for two years, but it was an anemic racquet, even with lead.

The 4D 300 seems to have maintained a familiar head shape and string pattern, but the throat and shoulders were somewhat foreign, if I remember correctly. However, the 4D technology supposedly strengthened the throat and shoulders a bit in the layup with a thinner beam, so I guess in theory things should even out. The response was definitely more modern, but I'm somewhat used to that by now, having hit the 300 Tour for two years and the BB London for one. The Bio. was in my vague perception a combination of the former HM tendencies (read frame shape) and modern layup.

Just curious of your thoughts on this. Thanks.

I have been playing with all the incarnations of the 300 except the MFil because I was too in love with my old 300G and not convinced by the demo (but some of my firends told me it remind them my 300G). To tell the truth I have no favourite. The AG and 4D are quite similar in terms of sensation (maybe the 4D feels to me a bit stiffer) and without good vibes, they feel tasteless. They are more beam box in the throat than the others and look as you mentionned more modern frame. The thinner part at the beginning of the hoop was already there on the AG. There is also a slightly difference of mold between the two, the 4D headshape is little larger and less long (it is a question of few millimeters, I admit) than AG. All in all, I have not rediscovered the same feeling and control I had with the 300G. The 300 tour versions were not said to be very dynamic racquets so I am not surprised by what you said. But if you have enjoyed the 300G, you should try to get a hand on the AG200 16x19 (Europe model, it should be closed to the Bio 200 Lite as what it is said somewhere in another thread). This was a good stick also, played with this for 2 years. A little more classic frame, a perfect oval headshape, a string pattern allowing to get some spin from a 95 (or 90 I do not remember), it rocks. A little bit more demanding but good to play! The Bio, even it is not a best seller seems to revive the 300 sensation.

ghia
02-02-2012, 09:44 AM
you should try to get a hand on the AG200 16x19 (Europe model, it should be closed to the Bio 200 Lite as what it is said somewhere in another thread). This was a good stick also, played with this for 2 years. A little more classic frame, a perfect oval headshape, a string pattern allowing to get some spin from a 95 (or 90 I do not remember), it rocks. A little bit more demanding but good to play! The Bio, even it is not a best seller seems to revive the 300 sensation.

The 200 16x19 is a 95 sq inch headsize. It most certainlly rocks. I don't find it demanding but perfectly balanced for a soild feel, with just enough weight in the hoop not to slow your swing.

Pneumated1
02-02-2012, 10:51 AM
But if you have enjoyed the 300G, you should try to get a hand on the AG200 16x19 (Europe model, it should be closed to the Bio 200 Lite as what it is said somewhere in another thread). . . . The Bio, even it is not a best seller seems to revive the 300 sensation.

Thanks for the rundown; it's as I suspected. I vaguely remember the AG 300 having a metallic vibration, which I didn't like at all coming from my modified 300G's muted "thud." The Bio. that I hit was solid with as little as 4 grams at 3/9, although I would put at least 6-8 grams in this location with either a heavy Gamma Hi-Tech synthetic or Volkl leather grip. I may take your suggestion and demo the 200 lite as well, as it's closer to my spec preferences, and I wouldn't mind the smaller head. I'm playing good tennis with my modified Londons, but there's the slightest sense of foreignness with the frame that a year's playing hasn't totally overcome. I had the same issue after playing with the KBlade for a year: I played well with the frame and had no substantial complaints (other than tennis elbow), but I always wanted to go back to the Dunlop 300. Maybe it's true that once you start out with a stick, and as long as they still make it, it's hard to move away. I guess that's why I'm posting in this thread:???:

NicoHK
02-02-2012, 11:13 PM
The 200 16x19 is a 95 sq inch headsize. It most certainlly rocks. I don't find it demanding but perfectly balanced for a soild feel, with just enough weight in the hoop not to slow your swing.

I have checked yesterday night on my 200 16x19 remaining, and you are right, it is a 95. I assume that if you do not find it a bit more demanding compare to the 300 version, it is that you are a better player than I am!

As I tend to find it slightly unstable, I added 4 grams at 3&9 and then I lost speed in my swing! Even though I used to play for one and half year with it and it was great, surely my favourite stick just after my old 300G.

NicoHK
02-02-2012, 11:24 PM
Thanks for the rundown; it's as I suspected. I vaguely remember the AG 300 having a metallic vibration, which I didn't like at all coming from my modified 300G's muted "thud." The Bio. that I hit was solid with as little as 4 grams at 3/9, although I would put at least 6-8 grams in this location with either a heavy Gamma Hi-Tech synthetic or Volkl leather grip. I may take your suggestion and demo the 200 lite as well, as it's closer to my spec preferences, and I wouldn't mind the smaller head. I'm playing good tennis with my modified Londons, but there's the slightest sense of foreignness with the frame that a year's playing hasn't totally overcome. I had the same issue after playing with the KBlade for a year: I played well with the frame and had no substantial complaints (other than tennis elbow), but I always wanted to go back to the Dunlop 300. Maybe it's true that once you start out with a stick, and as long as they still make it, it's hard to move away. I guess that's why I'm posting in this thread:???:

I don't know if I would have considered it as a metallic vibration but I understand what you mean. The kind of "ping" sound from the AG and also (even if less) of the 4D make them definitely not as nice as the 300G.

I have switched to the Head Speed 300 (ok, customized) but indeed, it was complicated to move from the 300, and I would say just from Dunlop! I may go back but if I want to perform, I had to stick with a racquet for long, always moving does not get me comfortable with my game. In case you make a demo of the Bio 200 Lite, let us know your feelings. I had a demo with the KBlade also, but it was not good for my arm either.

Pneumated1
02-03-2012, 03:36 AM
I don't know if I would have considered it as a metallic vibration but I understand what you mean. The kind of "ping" sound from the AG and also (even if less) of the 4D make them definitely not as nice as the 300G.

I have switched to the Head Speed 300 (ok, customized) but indeed, it was complicated to move from the 300, and I would say just from Dunlop! I may go back but if I want to perform, I had to stick with a racquet for long, always moving does not get me comfortable with my game. In case you make a demo of the Bio 200 Lite, let us know your feelings. I had a demo with the KBlade also, but it was not good for my arm either.

It was a long time ago, but you're right. It had a vibration that the 300G didn't have, but metallic may be the wrong term. I remember that it did have a much healthier swingweight, so I almost bought it. You could tell that it was a good racquet, just different.

And I agree completely that to play good tennis you have to pick a racquet, learn it, modify it to preferences (if necessary), and stick with it. I almost switched to the Bio. 300 this past Summer, but I've committed to the BB London, and I'm starting to benefit from that decision. In the back of my mind, however, is the question of whether or not I would benefit even more if I were to buy, modify, and commit to the Dunlop 300 again. One thing I know for sure is that I personally can't go wrong with either Dunlop or Volkl.

Anton
02-03-2012, 09:31 AM
It was a long time ago, but you're right. It had a vibration that the 300G didn't have, but metallic may be the wrong term. I remember that it did have a much healthier swingweight, so I almost bought it. You could tell that it was a good racquet, just different.

AG 300 had a more hollow feeling to it

Pneumated1
02-03-2012, 11:41 AM
AG 300 had a more hollow feeling to it

Have you compared the 300G with the Bio. yet?

Matt21
02-03-2012, 02:14 PM
I'll have to agree. I never played with the Muscle Weave line, but Dunlop just has not been the same since the Hotmelts. I still have one HM200g and HM Maxply McEnroe and feel-wise, there has been no Dunlop since that has come close. The Bios kinda have that feel, but they've changed weight balances and such so that the frames are still not the same.

Anton
02-03-2012, 04:59 PM
Have you compared the 300G with the Bio. yet?

Will string it up tommorow

Anton
02-16-2012, 04:07 PM
So, after a week of heavy playing 300G VS 300 Bio...I call it a draw.

Both rackets were strung with same string (Hyperion 16g at 58 lbs worked great in these rackets), same grip and over grip, both leaded up in the upper loop (4-5 grams).

Both had great but different feel.

With 300G you feel the plush flex like there is two parts to the racket, with 300 Bio the feel is more one piece solid pop with a bit of plush and not harsh in any way.

Both rackets are super stable per weight (both 11.4oz with over-grip and rubber band, very slightly headlight) with very generous sweet spot and consistent stringbed response.

300G just a tad less power (better for flat hitting), 300 more power, maybe better for spin.

Can't go wrong with either one - Best all court player's tweeners in my book.

Pneumated1
02-22-2012, 06:58 AM
I hit a Bio. 300 demo last night, and it has my vote. With a leather grip, overgrip, 6 grams at 3/9, and head tape over the bumper, it was like "going back home." The added weight in the hoop and on the handle created a familiar flex in throat that only modified 300G users could relate to.

I don't like it more than my modified Londons, but I like it in a different way. I would call the Bio. 300 (modified), by comparison, more controlled and precise (slightly), but it has "manual" access to pop, whereas the pop in the London is more "automatic." What really surprised me was how solid this Dunlop was up at net. You can flat stick some volleys with this racquet, but you lose a little of the pop of the London here. I didn't get to serve much with the frame, but the flat heater up the "T" was working well. It definitely has a quicker response on serve than my Londons, which are better for spin/kick serves. I didn't hit a slice/kicker with the Bio. 300, so I can't compare.

As far as feel: this stick is all about feel. You know where you are on the racquet face at all times, and manipulating the ball is easy. I personally think that this Bio. 300 has the biggest sweetspot of any Dunlop 300 I've played. Dead center is sublime, obviously, but even the upper hoop is responsive. I would rate the feel of this frame as crisply muted. It reminds me a lot of the 300G and is perfect imo. My Londons are soft, almost as if there's that fraction of lost feel somewhere through contact--but I can't complain about the feel of the London.

I'll probably buy this Dunlop, but I won't be getting rid of my Londons. I like them both and will just have to hit them side-by-side for awhile to see which is the best overall fit for me.

Anton
02-22-2012, 07:39 AM
I hit a Bio. 300 demo last night, and it has my vote. With a leather grip, overgrip, 6 grams at 3/9, and head tape over the bumper, it was like "going back home." The added weight in the hoop and on the handle created a familiar flex in throat that only modified 300G users could relate to.

I don't like it more than my modified Londons, but I like it in a different way. I would call the Bio. 300 (modified), by comparison, more controlled and precise (slightly), but it has "manual" access to pop, whereas the pop in the London is more "automatic." What really surprised me was how solid this Dunlop was up at net. You can flat stick some volleys with this racquet, but you lose a little of the pop of the London here. I didn't get to serve much with the frame, but the flat heater up the "T" was working well. It definitely has a quicker response on serve than my Londons, which are better for spin/kick serves. I didn't hit a slice/kicker with the Bio. 300, so I can't compare.

As far as feel: this stick is all about feel. You know where you are on the racquet face at all times, and manipulating the ball is easy. I personally think that this Bio. 300 has the biggest sweetspot of any Dunlop 300 I've played. Dead center is sublime, obviously, but even the upper hoop is responsive. I would rate the feel of this frame as crisply muted. It reminds me a lot of the 300G and is perfect imo. My Londons are soft, almost as if there's that fraction of lost feel somewhere through contact--but I can't complain about the feel of the London.

I'll probably buy this Dunlop, but I won't be getting rid of my Londons. I like them both and will just have to hit them side-by-side for awhile to see which is the best overall fit for me.

What strings and tension btw?

Pneumated1
02-22-2012, 08:17 AM
What strings and tension btw?

I forgot to mention that. It came with Dunlop Comfort Syn. 16, which is my usual cross string in a hybrid with Cyberblue or V-Pro, but this string was moving all over the place. Therefore, I stuck the best and cheapest string that I had in it for the week, which is Forten Sweet 16 at 58lbs. That was reference tension on a Klipper, so it may have come off the stringer at mid to lower 50's. Control was still amazing, which is impressive for a soft string at low tension.

Honestly, I was going for a higher tension but forgot that these 300's are usually 55-65lbs, or I would have strung it tighter. It works as is, though.

I can't imagine how well this frame would play with a quality stringbed.

dgoran
10-02-2012, 04:49 AM
Have to bump this as I recently tried max 200g which looks like 300g with new paint and some more weight and that's ok since it saves me 100ft of lead tape. I did not hit with it stock since I am not going to play it stock but I modified it to 365 with 6-7 gr of lead along the bumper and lots of lead about 1 in. It feels very very plusheven with bbo lower flex than 64-65 ra indicated by TW

Can anyone compare new 200g to old hotmelt 300g?

smirker
10-02-2012, 05:44 AM
I'll have to agree. I never played with the Muscle Weave line, but Dunlop just has not been the same since the Hotmelts. I still have one HM200g and HM Maxply McEnroe and feel-wise, there has been no Dunlop since that has come close. The Bios kinda have that feel, but they've changed weight balances and such so that the frames are still not the same.

That's because the head racquet designer left Dunlop after the Hotmelt/Muscleweave to set up Vantage (now Angell) > I have three m-fil 300's and, whilst a nice racquet when modified I found it to be dead outside of the relatively small sweet spot. Had a chance to buy a 300g a while back, wish I had done along with the RDX 500 MP I also passed up!