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View Full Version : How to counter this? V.2


Roddick33
01-28-2012, 10:19 PM
Say someone hits great but freezes up during a match.

What would you say is the cause/what would you suggest?

Is it mental? Or does his serving just suck (for the thread's sake, just assume his serving is fine).

Really, if you are a great hitter but a terrible player, is it mental, just play more sets, or what?

ace_pace
01-28-2012, 10:53 PM
I used to be like that. I found out its all mental.

Just hit like you do in practice or whenever you hit great. I know you think its easier said than done but really just DO it. Better off hitting balls out going for winners than hitting balls out trying to play safely, no?

Roddick33
01-28-2012, 10:55 PM
I used to be like that. I found out its all mental.

Just hit like you do in practice or whenever you hit great. I know you think its easier said than done but really just DO it. Better off hitting balls out going for winners than hitting balls out trying to play safely, no?

Hmm I understand. But here's a tough question:

If you go for winners, you get them in 50% of the time.
If you play safe, you win 70% of the time.
But hitting winners is how you regularly play (that's your level)

What should you opt for now?

ace_pace
01-28-2012, 11:01 PM
Hmm I understand. But here's a tough question:

If you go for winners, you get them in 50% of the time.
If you play sage, you win 70% of the time.
But hitting winners is how you regularly play (that's your level)

What should you opt for now?

Well the example I had was really to motivate you into believing in your own weapons. But obviously you don't go for low percentage shots all the time. Moderation and strategy is key. Have a plan when playing, dont just mindlessly hit the ball. Knowing what to do not only improves confidence, but your gameplay as well.

Roddick33
01-28-2012, 11:03 PM
Well the example I had was really to motivate you into believing in your own weapons. But obviously you don't go for low percentage shots all the time. Moderation and strategy is key. Have a plan when playing, dont just mindlessly hit the ball. Knowing what to do not only improves confidence, but your gameplay as well.

Okay, I'll try. thanks brah.

ace_pace
01-28-2012, 11:09 PM
Just one last thing, remember to play a lot of matches. Sure you can practice your technical game by yourself but in the end you'll need to practice your mental game by simply playing matches. The more experience you have, the better you'll be at handling pressure.

Good luck!

Maui19
01-29-2012, 05:49 AM
Hmm I understand. But here's a tough question:

If you go for winners, you get them in 50% of the time.
If you play safe, you win 70% of the time.
But hitting winners is how you regularly play (that's your level)

What should you opt for now?

If you win 70% of the points playing safe, then you play safe and win all your matches.

Chyeaah
01-29-2012, 06:06 AM
Say someone hits great but freezes up during a match.

Its the yips.

Definately mental.

Also do some warm ups to loosen up. Don't play safe, it's not fun pushing and pushing you'll get more satisfaction by hitting a few winners than to win the game, except if its a tourno and there are prizes =D.

mikeler
01-29-2012, 11:18 AM
Play as many tournaments and league matches as you can.

papa
01-30-2012, 05:50 AM
Sometimes, just playing a lot isn't the answer - be nice to think it was. Sure it helps but often there are many other problems. Some get bored quickly, daydreamers, don't care for the pace of the game, are distracted easily by everything, like to goff off too much, etc.

LuckyR
01-31-2012, 05:02 PM
Say someone hits great but freezes up during a match.

What would you say is the cause/what would you suggest?

Is it mental? Or does his serving just suck (for the thread's sake, just assume his serving is fine).

Really, if you are a great hitter but a terrible player, is it mental, just play more sets, or what?

First of all, if you play poorly in matchplay, you play poorly. Hitting balls on the practice court, is fun, but it isn't tennis.

That aside, clearly the player you are describing has Mental Game issues. Likely either a fear of losing (if it starts at the beginning of the match) or a fear of winning (if it is at the end of the match).

The mental strategies are different for the two problems.

Frank Silbermann
01-31-2012, 05:17 PM
I found that for me, much of it was my tendency to tighten up physically when nervous. Things got better when I learned to check myself for muscle tension and consciously soften my muscles between points, while waiting for the ball, etc. For example, Brent Abel reminds people to hold the racket loosely while awaiting serve.

5263
01-31-2012, 08:02 PM
Hmm I understand. But here's a tough question:

If you go for winners, you get them in 50% of the time.
If you play safe, you win 70% of the time.
But hitting winners is how you regularly play (that's your level)

What should you opt for now?

In the above case you are better than most players.

If you can play safe and win 70%, then your safe game is pretty solid,
not freezing up.
All of us can hit bigger than we normally do in matches, but make some
adjustments to be more consistent.
The better you get, the more you can play aggressive and keep it in the
court. Nothing more experience will not help.

spaceman_spiff
02-01-2012, 03:17 AM
One theory I've come up with recently is that much of this nervousness is due to a lack of practice when it comes facing serves.

If you think about it, most people just hit groundstrokes and some volleys when they practice. And when they do practice their serves, they don't practice their returns. So, they can serve fine and they hit well in a rally, but those rallies all start with a feed and a couple of safety shots before they really get going.

Then, when you put them in a match, suddenly they have to face an opponent who is hitting hard serves and going for blood straight away. So all of the sudden, the player is forced to hit what is probably his least practiced shot (serve return) in an environment he is not used to (dog-eat-dog, no holds barred competition). Gone are the rallies that start down the middle and develop a rythm, where no one goes for winners until at least a couple of shots have been hit. Everything happens much faster, and mistakes have more severe consequences; hence, the player struggles to deal with the situation.

As ace_pace mentioned, you need to play more practice matches rather than only rallying and such.

Mountain Ghost
02-01-2012, 03:56 AM
You can't fix mental issues with more mental concepts!

You need to find a way to bring your mind back into THIS moment. The score is all about past and future. Focusing on breathing, some physical sensation or some technical reference point will help bring your mind back to where it belongs . . . HERE & NOW!

The other thing I tell my students . . . Don't focus on HOW you're doing . . . Focus on WHAT you're doing.

MG

Limpinhitter
02-01-2012, 07:11 AM
Say someone hits great but freezes up during a match.

What would you say is the cause/what would you suggest?

Is it mental? Or does his serving just suck (for the thread's sake, just assume his serving is fine).

Really, if you are a great hitter but a terrible player, is it mental, just play more sets, or what?

The way to play your best during a match is to forget about the score, forget about winning and losing, and focus exclusively on "executing" your shots one shot at a time, and "executing" your game plan one point at a time. When a point is over, win or lose, it's over. Immediately shift your focus to executing your shots and your gameplan on the next point.

PS: See post #15. Excellent variation on the same theme.