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RF16A
01-29-2012, 09:08 AM
How strong do you need to be to play with it?
How good timing do you need?
How good hand eye co-ordination do you need?
If you have good hand eye coordination can a beginner play with it?

Fuji
01-29-2012, 09:27 AM
1) Not strong, you need to have good MECHANICS to play with it.
2) Good timing is a definite.
3) Hand eye coordination is must, especially for tennis. ;)
4) Beginners can play with whatever they like! Will it be the easiest frame to play with? Heck no! Will it be fun to play with? Possibly. There are always better options out there for beginners rather then a 90 inch mid, especially in today's game, but really no one can say "such and such shouldn't play with a frame." All I'm saying is there are better options out there to get started with.

-Fuji

Kal-El 34
01-29-2012, 09:30 AM
1) Not strong, you need to have good MECHANICS to play with it.
2) Good timing is a definite.
3) Hand eye coordination is must, especially for tennis. ;)
4) Beginners can play with whatever they like! Will it be the easiest frame to play with? Heck no! Will it be fun to play with? Possibly. There are always better options out there for beginners rather then a 90 inch mid, especially in today's game, but really no one can say "such and such shouldn't play with a frame." All I'm saying is there are better options out there to get started with.

-Fuji

well said man... well said

PeterFig
01-29-2012, 10:20 AM
I'm going to make a bit of a leap here ... but I think a correct one ... the OP - RF16A is the same dude that has been banned here twice before as adam13 and adam180.

If I'm wrong my apologies in advance.

See:
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=6191094&postcount=7

and search for threads by adam13 and adam180 compared to the two new ones started by RF16A today and you'll see what I mean :)

RF16A
01-29-2012, 10:45 AM
No I am not the same person, sorry to dissapoint you.

RF16A
01-29-2012, 01:02 PM
Is it difficult to learn to play with or play with in general? (for the first session I go to I will be using an old racket to see if I will continue playing before spending lots of money)

Yonie
01-29-2012, 01:07 PM
And you wanna play with this racket because?
Federer plays with it and you're hoping to become the 2nd GOAT?

RF16A
01-29-2012, 01:12 PM
yer federer is the reason but then I have good timing and hand eye coordination and can learn quick and want a all court game

Fuji
01-29-2012, 01:15 PM
Is it difficult to learn to play with or play with in general? (for the first session I go to I will be using an old racket to see if I will continue playing before spending lots of money)

Well I have two very distinct train of thoughts on this.

If you haven't played with anything else, then you really won't notice the difference. Let's say that you only hit with the BLX90 for your first couple years of playing, you won't notice the difference compared to if you were playing with a more, "introductory" racket.

I personally don't believe that any racket is "difficult" to play with at any level. There are just some rackets that play more efficiently at different levels.

On the other hand, from what I have seen from other people....

It's a very difficult racket to work with in the beginning. I have plenty of beginner to intermediate friends who play with the BLX 90, and end up very frustrated with their games because they aren't getting the results they want. Tennis is about getting one more ball over the net all the way up to the top 200 in the world. Whatever lets you do that most effectively should be your racket of choice. The BLX has a small head, with a matching small sweet spot. Serving will be the biggest factor here. The smaller the sweet spot, the better it feels, but the harder it is to hit, consistently in the middle of the bed.

Sorry for the long-ish post, but all in all I would have to say in your situation, Yes. It is going to be more difficult to play with in the beginning. If you do decide to stick with the sport, then it may be very beneficial to you as the BLX90 has a LOT of weight, compared to most other rackets out there. 12.6oz is a lot to be swinging out there for a few hours at a time if you're not used to it. It all comes down to practice. If you are going to be practicing a lot, and be dedicated with learning proper technique and mechanics, the 90 will probably pay off in the long run. However, if you are looking for more of a social/recreational aspect of tennis, then I would recommend options that are more suited to what you want. :)

This is all just a bit of my information I've gathered from being here a while, and helping a lot of people find rackets that match their games. Take it with a grain of salt! Also feel free to ask any questions at all and I will try my best to help you. If I can't, there are tons of other people on here who are more then qualified.

-Fuji

RF16A
01-29-2012, 01:25 PM
I am looking to be competative, good player and get to at least winning at county level (i think its like grade 4 on lta website) and anything above that would be a very good plus. I want to learn good technique and will play as much as possible but play lotss of other sport and have education. By other sport I mean I play lots of cricket. like 3+ times a week but looking to play tennis 2+ a week.

RF16A
01-29-2012, 01:27 PM
No I am not the same person, sorry to dissapoint you.

I know people are saying i have used this forum before but I have read some of his posts and we are from different places

UCSF2012
01-29-2012, 06:44 PM
Just buy one and try it out. You'll never know until you use it. You could always sell it off used if you can't make it work for you. You could also start with the nCode 90, just because it's $40-ish used.

It's easier to make good ball contact with the 90 than those 95's and 100's. The reason is because it doesn't swing as quickly. I frame many more shots on my K95 than my 90 an 88.

Fed Kennedy
01-29-2012, 06:56 PM
Purchase it and begin thy quest toward Goathood

drakulie
01-29-2012, 07:14 PM
How strong do you need to be to play with it?

strong enough to pick it up and swing it.


can a beginner play with it?

Yes. Most likely, if you are a beginner, you will be playing with other beginners, so just go out and have fun.

Edo
01-30-2012, 08:09 AM
dumb question here: i've found in a local store one ps 6.1 90 without rog's signature. I hate everything signature, so I'm tempted to get this one without autograph, but my question is: if I want to buy a second one, do I have chances to find another one matched without autograph? Or is this one some sort of mispainted 1 of a kind?
...Yeah, I know, that's freaky... :oops:

Pavlos
01-30-2012, 09:05 AM
Could it possibly be a fake?

Edo
01-30-2012, 09:31 AM
Could it possibly be a fake?

i doubt it, it's the top tennis store in town..

TexasTennisbum
01-30-2012, 09:32 AM
Fuji has very good advice and an interesting logic to racquet selection.

I played with the BLX90 this weekend for a few hours, it is a great serve and volley racquet, it is a close second to the ultimate serve and volley racquet (my opinion) the K88.

This stick will give you 90% better volleys than most beginner/intermediate sticks, but you have to be a natural or an extremely experienced player to get these results.

If winning matches is your goal and you aren't a serve and volley player, I would use a larger head racquet, probably a 98 is best.

RF16A
01-30-2012, 12:51 PM
would an all court game suit this racket rather than just serve and volley specifically
also is it difficult to hit deep and flat with consistently but if you learn with it will it be more natural to do with it.

RF16A
01-30-2012, 12:52 PM
*? (forgot question marks)

Fed Kennedy
01-30-2012, 12:53 PM
Just get the racquet. It hits every shot better than any racquet on the market. The only limit is your own ability.

sunof tennis
01-30-2012, 03:50 PM
would an all court game suit this racket rather than just serve and volley specifically
also is it difficult to hit deep and flat with consistently but if you learn with it will it be more natural to do with it.

Fed seems to play a pretty good all aound game with it. Are there easier racquets, of course, but is possible to learn to play with the 90, absolutely.
Some of us geezers learned to play with 70 sq. in. wood racquets.

Captain Tezuka
01-30-2012, 04:32 PM
Fed seems to play a pretty good all aound game with it. Are there easier racquets, of course, but is possible to learn to play with the 90, absolutely.
Some of us geezers learned to play with 70 sq. in. wood racquets.

Wow really? 70 inch that must be really small and heavy oh man I'm so lucky I don't have to use those. It's true small headsize smaller sweetspot generally. Just a question do you think going from a 102 inch headsize to a 95 inch headsize is way too much of a change to adapt to?

Thanks

-Tezuka

2Hare
01-30-2012, 05:23 PM
Another thing to consider is that sixone 90s are really sensitive to string setup compared to more modern frames. Full poly doesn't work that well in this frame as it killed the power and the touches. It's meant to be played with gut or half gut I believe.

If I was starting tennis, I would just go with more modern frames that take full poly well as that's the way to go these days. If want to go with Wilson, you might want to check out BLX Blade 98, which is fantastic at every level if you ask me.

Fed Kennedy
01-30-2012, 05:43 PM
There is only one you, you are a snowflake. A snowflake that aspires to be like Rogi. Do not let anyone dampen your dream, spread your wings and fly with Rogi. It is not possible to do this with midplus racquets, they do not have the magic

stormholloway
01-30-2012, 05:52 PM
Another thing to consider is that sixone 90s are really sensitive to string setup compared to more modern frames. Full poly doesn't work that well in this frame as it killed the power and the touches. It's meant to be played with gut or half gut I believe.

If I was starting tennis, I would just go with more modern frames that take full poly well as that's the way to go these days. If want to go with Wilson, you might want to check out BLX Blade 98, which is fantastic at every level if you ask me.

I think fully poly is fine in the Wilson 90s. I agree about the touch lacking a bit but the power is there. The K90, for example, has a deep power reserve.

Fuji
01-30-2012, 06:12 PM
There is only one you, you are a snowflake. A snowflake that aspires to be like Rogi. Do not let anyone dampen your dream, spread your wings and fly with Rogi. It is not possible to do this with midplus racquets, they do not have the magic

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTCRju3je97ftn19WCj_ee64OkJHT1ni nmB1BFWQqKehKwi09NO

-Fuji

2Hare
01-30-2012, 06:36 PM
I think fully poly is fine in the Wilson 90s. I agree about the touch lacking a bit but the power is there. The K90, for example, has a deep power reserve.

Yes, it's fine, but not good. You'll be in disadvantage with a full poly 90 going up against young power players.

drakulie
01-30-2012, 07:23 PM
Another thing to consider is that sixone 90s are really sensitive to string setup compared to more modern frames.

The BLX 90 IS a modern frame. That said, it is no more or less sensitive than other "modern" frames.


Full poly doesn't work that well in this frame as it killed the power and the touches.

Newsflash. Poly kills power and touch in ALL frames. Fact is, poly compared to multis or other synthetics and natural gut is underpowered and not as good with "touch" shots. This isn't reserved just for 90 sq inch frames.


If I was starting tennis, I would just go with more modern frames that take full poly well as that's the way to go these days.

Anyone just starting tennis, everything being equal using your own argument, has no business playing with poly. Here are the facts about poly strings compared to non-poly strings:

1. It is less powerful.
2. It is more uncomfortable (stiffer)
3. Has less spin.
4. Horrible on touch shots.
5. Loses tension extremely quickly.
6. Dies in a few days.
7. People are too stupid and/or cheap to cut it out after it dies, which results in them working even harder to get action on the ball.

Now, all the advantages you are arguing for about using "modern frames", you have taken away by advising to go to poly.

2Hare
01-31-2012, 12:15 AM
First of all, I'm in no way bashing BLX90 as I use one, but BLX90 is basically an updated version of PS90, kinda like F-18 and Superhornet. I wouldn't consider it a true modern frame from its frame and material design. I'm not saying that it's bad, I'm saying it needs something like gut/poly to bring it up to the level that's more competitive with newer frames.

Yes, Poly decreases touches and power of all the frames, but its negative effects are even more pronounce on a 90 inch racket.

As for polys for new comers, I've seen plenty of them using polys and not having a problem. Poly give them the durability they desire. And they are not at a level where poly would go dead fast on them. Even when it finally does, like after 1 year or 2 of using it recreationally, they simply don't notice it. Multis simply break or start moving too fast for them. Go out there and see how many new players are using polys these days.

Fuji
01-31-2012, 12:23 AM
First of all, I'm in no way bashing BLX90 as I use one, but BLX90 is basically an updated version of PS90, kinda like F-18 and Superhornet. I wouldn't consider it a true modern frame from its frame and material design. I'm not saying that it's bad, I'm saying it needs something like gut/poly to bring it up to the level that's more competitive with newer frames.

Yes, Poly decreases touches and power of all the frames, but its negative effects are even more pronounce on a 90 inch racket.

As for polys for new comers, I've seen plenty of them using polys and not having a problem. Poly give them the durability they desire. And they are not at a level where poly would go dead fast on them. Even when it finally does, like after 1 year or 2 of using it recreationally, they simply don't notice it. Multis simply break or start moving too fast for them. Go out there and see how many new players are using polys these days.

I have to disagree with you on poly. Beginners do notice poly when their arm starts hurting. No offense to any beginners of course, but normally their strokes are not what poly is meant for, and thus it causes pain for them. Most beginners can play with syn guts no problem for the first few years, heck, I STILL play with syn guts during my winter because poly dies too fast. Poly dies regardless if you use it or not. Just sitting, it looses something like 15% of its tension in the first 24 hours and a subsequent amount from there on out.

I've seen a few beginners out hitting with different poly, and I've seen every single one of them wearing arm braces. Coincidence? Possibly, but chances are it's a bit more then that.

Poly honestly isn't needed for most people playing tennis, especially beginners. Unless they are tearing the felt off the ball, then poly doesn't really serve a purpose. It needs to be changed even more frequently then syn guts for most players.

Also don't forget here, OP is just getting into tennis. He doesn't need natty gut, poly or even multis at this point. Just cheap Prince Synthetic gut will serve all he needs.

-Fuji

2Hare
01-31-2012, 12:46 AM
I have to disagree with you on poly. Beginners do notice poly when their arm starts hurting. No offense to any beginners of course, but normally their strokes are not what poly is meant for, and thus it causes pain for them. Most beginners can play with syn guts no problem for the first few years, heck, I STILL play with syn guts during my winter because poly dies too fast. Poly dies regardless if you use it or not. Just sitting, it looses something like 15% of its tension in the first 24 hours and a subsequent amount from there on out.

I've seen a few beginners out hitting with different poly, and I've seen every single one of them wearing arm braces. Coincidence? Possibly, but chances are it's a bit more then that.

Poly honestly isn't needed for most people playing tennis, especially beginners. Unless they are tearing the felt off the ball, then poly doesn't really serve a purpose. It needs to be changed even more frequently then syn guts for most players.

Also don't forget here, OP is just getting into tennis. He doesn't need natty gut, poly or even multis at this point. Just cheap Prince Synthetic gut will serve all he needs.

-Fuji

I don't know if you've ever seen those tension graphs that plot poly, multis and synguts against playtime. Poly has a high initial tension drop, but afterward it's surprisingly stable in tension, at least in comparison to multis and synguts. Multis and syngut on the other hand have constant, and linearly decreasing tension. The more you play the more it sux, where as poly would stop tension drop at a level. It's like comparing a logistic graphc to a negative line graph.

What I'm saying is polys will last longer in terms of mid-low playability, which is acceptable for 2.5 or even 3 or lower players, than multis and synguts. Not to mention it doesn't break or move as easily as those as well. And there are many new generations of polys out there that don't hurt you as much as stiffer polys from before. Unless you have elbow problems using polys, I believe polys are the way to go right now.

2Hare
01-31-2012, 12:48 AM
Are you guys seriously think that OP should use a PSBLX 90 instead of a Blade 98? Or are you just arguing for the arguing sake??

JGads
01-31-2012, 12:51 AM
Are you guys seriously think that OP should use a PSBLX 90 instead of a Blade 98? Or are you just arguing for the arguing sake??

Just to play devil's advocate, the BLX Blade 98 swung like a log to me when I tried it. Of the 'easier to play' with frames, there are some that are much easier to swing than the BLX Blade 98, I think. K-Blade 98 swung easier, Microgel Radical MP or oversize could be good. Really endless possibilities. A pre-strung cheap racquet at a local sporting goods store works for a beginner, too.

drakulie
01-31-2012, 07:02 AM
I don't know if you've ever seen those tension graphs that plot poly, multis and synguts against playtime. Poly has a high initial tension drop, but afterward it's surprisingly stable in tension, at least in comparison to multis and synguts.

Because it doesn't have elasticity,,,, hence it goes dead, loses what power it had, spin, etc.

drakulie
01-31-2012, 07:05 AM
As for polys for new comers, I've seen plenty of them using polys and not having a problem. Poly give them the durability they desire. And they are not at a level where poly would go dead fast on them. Even when it finally does, like after 1 year or 2 of using it recreationally, they simply don't notice it. Multis simply break or start moving too fast for them. Go out there and see how many new players are using polys these days.

Uhmm, poly does NOT last for two years. It goes dead within days of being strung. A couple weeks at most.

Like I said, most of the people we are referring to get more bang for their buck using anything else.

2Hare
01-31-2012, 09:37 AM
Uhmm, poly does NOT last for two years. It goes dead within days of being strung. A couple weeks at most.

Like I said, most of the people we are referring to get more bang for their buck using anything else.

I know man, I totally get that. I feel the same way, but that's true only when you get to a certain level. I've seen so many level 3.0 or below recreational players who've been playing with the same poly for more than half year. They didn't complain about it. I wouldn't touch that, but that doesn't mean others won't

drakulie
01-31-2012, 09:51 AM
^^^^^
and they have been Playing with dead strings for the 6 months you are referring to, where as they would be getting more power, spin, control and comfort with any other type of synthetic for that period of time. Hence, they are getting more bang for their buck.

2Hare
01-31-2012, 10:52 AM
^^^^^
and they have been Playing with dead strings for the 6 months you are referring to, where as they would be getting more power, spin, control and comfort with any other type of synthetic for that period of time. Hence, they are getting more bang for their buck.

I think they just don't want the strings to break or move. Both syngut and multis break much faster than poly. Not to mention they start moving pretty much when you start using it. Also since they tend to use an 98inch+ frame, which have enough power to go through a semi dead poly, they don't mind poly going dead on them. I know this might spell tennis elbow, but most of these people simply don't play enough or with enough power to get it at this stage.

sunof tennis
01-31-2012, 03:10 PM
Wow really? 70 inch that must be really small and heavy oh man I'm so lucky I don't have to use those. It's true small headsize smaller sweetspot generally. Just a question do you think going from a 102 inch headsize to a 95 inch headsize is way too much of a change to adapt to?

Thanks

-Tezuka

Only one way to find out. If so, another poster suggested the Blade98 which is a nice racquet as well.

stormholloway
01-31-2012, 10:48 PM
So how long will ALU Power go dead in a racquet without being played?

2Hare
01-31-2012, 10:55 PM
So how long will ALU Power go dead in a racquet without being played?

It won't. You can leave it in there for a year without playing it and it still won't be dead unless you string it at unusually high tension

Captain Tezuka
01-31-2012, 11:00 PM
Only one way to find out. If so, another poster suggested the Blade98 which is a nice racquet as well.

Hm yeah demos coming soon. Most likely two weeks of demo before buying. :D Erm yeah ok I'll try it.

drakulie
01-31-2012, 11:15 PM
I think they just don't want the strings to break or move. Both syngut and multis break much faster than poly. Not to mention they start moving pretty much when you start using it. Also since they tend to use an 98inch+ frame, which have enough power to go through a semi dead poly, they don't mind poly going dead on them. I know this might spell tennis elbow, but most of these people simply don't play enough or with enough power to get it at this stage.

If they don't play enough or have enough power, then again, why hamper them with a string that goes dead in a few days, is underpowered, not as comfortable, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc??

Again, they would get more bang for their buck, especially if they don't "play enough" or have enough "power" with a multi or other syntehtic. Obvously, if they are not playing enough, nor hit with power, then they wouldn't be breaking multis.

and yes, poly begins to go dead once you begin stringing it.

2Hare
01-31-2012, 11:33 PM
If they don't play enough or have enough power, then again, why hamper them with a string that goes dead in a few days, is underpowered, not as comfortable, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc??

Again, they would get more bang for their buck, especially if they don't "play enough" or have enough "power" with a multi or other syntehtic. Obvously, if they are not playing enough, nor hit with power, then they wouldn't be breaking multis.

and yes, poly begins to go dead once you begin stringing it.

We seemed to be locked up in this cycle. Like I said before, for durability and string movement. poly don't go dead nearly as fast for them because they don't enough power to push the elasticity of the polys.

And no poly don't go dead after you string them. They will settle after a huge initial drop of tension. After that if you don't hit with it, it'll pretty much stay at close to that tension, at least for the higher quality polys like lux. I don't know if that's true for the soft polys out there.

zultekmilennia
02-01-2012, 06:15 AM
I have to disagree with you on poly. Beginners do notice poly when their arm starts hurting. No offense to any beginners of course, but normally their strokes are not what poly is meant for, and thus it causes pain for them. Most beginners can play with syn guts no problem for the first few years, heck, I STILL play with syn guts during my winter because poly dies too fast. Poly dies regardless if you use it or not. Just sitting, it looses something like 15% of its tension in the first 24 hours and a subsequent amount from there on out.

I've seen a few beginners out hitting with different poly, and I've seen every single one of them wearing arm braces. Coincidence? Possibly, but chances are it's a bit more then that.

Poly honestly isn't needed for most people playing tennis, especially beginners. Unless they are tearing the felt off the ball, then poly doesn't really serve a purpose. It needs to be changed even more frequently then syn guts for most players.


-Fuji

referring to this, and the post above me.


So, does poly generally goes dead after a few weeks, or just drop in tension and then stays there for a while?

I strung my K95 with Pro Supex Big Ace Revo mains and Gosen Micro crosses, both at 55, and after some initial arm pain (my first week changing to the K95, from APDC), it played fine. Had more accuracy, less power, basically what I wanted.

Though keep tearing the felt off my balls, what does that say anyway?

drakulie
02-01-2012, 08:30 AM
We seemed to be locked up in this cycle. Like I said before, for durability and string movement. poly don't go dead nearly as fast for them because they don't enough power to push the elasticity of the polys.

And no poly don't go dead after you string them. They will settle after a huge initial drop of tension. After that if you don't hit with it, it'll pretty much stay at close to that tension, at least for the higher quality polys like lux. I don't know if that's true for the soft polys out there.

You are a very misinformed consumer. Poly, once is strung begins to go dead. Period. It is not nuclear powered and have a "shelf life" of a thousand years.

klementine
02-01-2012, 08:55 AM
^ Agreed. I had purchased a frame that had been 'freshly' strung with a poly about six months prior to purchase.

The string was unplayable. Completely 'dead' and tension measured 32lbs. I believe it was BBO.

Poly is only for those who have the luxury of getting string jobs every week or so. The rest are better off with a hybrid of multi/syn.gut.

chenc
02-01-2012, 09:58 AM
With OP's best interest in mind I recommend OP start with something more use-friendly like Babolat AeroPro Drive GT or PureDrive GT.

stormholloway
02-01-2012, 10:20 AM
You are a very misinformed consumer. Poly, once is strung begins to go dead. Period. It is not nuclear powered and have a "shelf life" of a thousand years.

Ok then what is it's shelf life? In other words, is it worth stringing 3 racquets together if I only go through each string job in 1-2 weeks?

Fuji
02-03-2012, 07:20 PM
Ok then what is it's shelf life? In other words, is it worth stringing 3 racquets together if I only go through each string job in 1-2 weeks?

Honestly, I wouldn't bother. Depending on the string, the general "life" for me without playing and still having it "playable," is about 4-5 days. Once a week is ideal for someone like me. I do go through poly beds, so It's not as harsh on my arm, although as stated before, standard synthetic works much much better when my play schedule isn't heavy.

-Fuji

Fuji
02-03-2012, 07:22 PM
^ Agreed. I had purchased a frame that had been 'freshly' strung with a poly about six months prior to purchase.

The string was unplayable. Completely 'dead' and tension measured 32lbs. I believe it was BBO.

Poly is only for those who have the luxury of getting string jobs every week or so. The rest are better off with a hybrid of multi/syn.gut.

Funny story, I bought a frame that was strung 14 months prior ago with "fresh poly" which was some twisted razor type poly. I didn't measure the tension, but I broke it in about 5-6 minutes of just hitting some serves. It just felt so fragile, such an odd feeling to hit with.

-Fuji