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luishcorreia
01-30-2012, 06:09 AM
Following recent posts about "angles" and "when to go DTL (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=410094)", I just published a new post where I talk about the geometry behind Directional Rules and shot selection patterns.

http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com/2012/01/geometric-game.html

Hope you guys enjoy and please give me some feedback on what you think.

Cheers.

charliefedererer
01-30-2012, 06:34 AM
Nice clear explanation with well thought out and drawn illustrations to make your points. Good going!



Watching Rafa and Djoker defy geometry for almost 6 hours at the AO by so frequently changing direction to go DTL and avoid their opposite handed adversaries forehand was almost as great a testament to their tennis greatness as their athleticism and iron wills.

sureshs
01-30-2012, 07:31 AM
Most pros simply hit to where their opponent isn't, or up the middle when cornered. They don't seem to follow these guidelines.

luishcorreia
01-30-2012, 08:36 AM
Most pros simply hit to where their opponent isn't, or up the middle when cornered. They don't seem to follow these guidelines.

To "hit to where their opponent isn't" is pretty much the directional rules.

If you get an outside groundstroke, e.g., a cross-court shot, to your forehand you opponent wont be on your right side, ...right? That would be a huge banana shot :)

sureshs
01-30-2012, 08:40 AM
To "hit to where their opponent isn't" is pretty much the directional rules.

If you get an outside groundstroke, e.g., a cross-court shot, to your forehand you opponent wont be on your right side, ...right? That would be a huge banana shot :)

Many times pros simply try to oscillate the opponent. If they hit a CC forehand and the opponent moves to the deuce court to return it, they hit the next shot DTL, even if the opponent is trying to recover. The strategy is simply to pull the opponent side to side (or front to back, by drop shot and lob). All of these fall into the category of hitting where the opponent isn't.

Bagumbawalla
01-30-2012, 03:54 PM
When I was starting out, I was taught to imagine the opponet's (singles) court looking like a large tic tac toe game, and to avoid hitting balls to the center square or to the middle-bottom square.

It follows that you start out hitting to the back corners (or sometimes back middle) and as the opportunity arises you open the court by going to the side/middle squares or, possibly dropshotting the near corners.

Seems a similar concept.

sureshs
01-31-2012, 07:38 AM
Up the middle is the worst. Was recently confirmed by a coach as a very bad thing to do in a match.

Limpinhitter
01-31-2012, 07:48 AM
Up the middle is the worst. Was recently confirmed by a coach as a very bad thing to do in a match.

Sounds like a coach that doesn't know much about the game. Like all other shots, up the middle has its place.

Limpinhitter
01-31-2012, 07:57 AM
Following recent posts about "angles" and "when to go DTL (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=410094)", I just published a new post where I talk about the geometry behind Directional Rules and shot selection patterns.

http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com/2012/01/geometric-game.html

Hope you guys enjoy and please give me some feedback on what you think.

Cheers.

I think you've left out the basic premise of directionals. The reason it's difficult to redirect a cross court "outside" shot (moving across your body) DTL is that the ball has a tendency to ricohet off of the racquet due to the angle of the incoming cross court shot causing a DTL attempt to go wide. Obviously, the more pace on the incoming cross court shot, the stronger the tendency for it to ricochet sideways off of the racquet. A slower ball has less tendency to recochet, and a shorter ball enlargens the target DTL.

But, the reason and "inside" shot (coming in to your body, rather than an outside shot going across your body), can be redirected is because you are hitting with the ricochet rather than against it. That's why an inside-in forehand can be so devastating. In addition, I can't tell you how many times I've seen Berdych and Soderling try to redirect a cross court ball DTL against Nadal only to have it either fade wide for an UE, or overcorrect making it an inside shot to Nadal that he redirects cross court into an empty court for an easy winner from the baseline.

5263
01-31-2012, 08:07 AM
When I was starting out, I was taught to imagine the opponet's (singles) court looking like a large tic tac toe game, and to avoid hitting balls to the center square or to the middle-bottom square.

It follows that you start out hitting to the back corners (or sometimes back middle) and as the opportunity arises you open the court by going to the side/middle squares or, possibly dropshotting the near corners.

Seems a similar concept.

That one is excellent!

5263
01-31-2012, 08:08 AM
The reason it's difficult to redirect a cross court "outside" shot (moving across your body) DTL is that the ball has a tendency to ricohet off of the racquet due to the angle of the incoming cross court shot causing a DTL attempt to go wide. Obviously, the more pace on the incoming cross court shot, the stronger the tendency for it to ricochet sideways off of the racquet. A slower ball has less tendency to recochet, and a shorter ball enlargens the target DTL.

But, the reason and "inside" shot (coming in to your body, rather than an outside shot going across your body), can be redirected is because you are hitting with the ricochet rather than against it. That's why an inside-in forehand can be so devastating. In addition, I can't tell you how many times I've seen Berdych and Soderling try to redirect a cross court ball DTL against Nadal only to have it either fade wide for an UE, or overcorrect making it an inside shot to Nadal that he redirects cross court into an empty court for an easy winner from the baseline.

Very important point here.

dominikk1985
01-31-2012, 09:50 AM
To "hit to where their opponent isn't" is pretty much the directional rules.

If you get an outside groundstroke, e.g., a cross-court shot, to your forehand you opponent wont be on your right side, ...right? That would be a huge banana shot :)

really? I thought directionals was more hitting where the ball came from. A cc shot usually will be returned cc. against a DTL shot you can do both.

if you return a cc shot to where it came from the opponent doesn't have to move much.

luishcorreia
02-01-2012, 07:14 AM
really? I thought directionals was more hitting where the ball came from. A cc shot usually will be returned cc. against a DTL shot you can do both.

if you return a cc shot to where it came from the opponent doesn't have to move much.

No exactly. Directionals says that if you are behind the baseline you should not change the direction of outside ground strokes. For inside ground-strokes you should change the direction where the ball came from. http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com/2011/07/wardlaw-directional-rules.html

If you get a short ball even if its an outside ground stroke you can do a 90 change of direction. http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com/2012/01/when-to-pull-triggerdown-line.html

You can read all about it in this amazing blog :)
http://online-tennis-blog.blogspot.com

Ducker
02-02-2012, 09:52 AM
I have alot of success hitting a junk ball high topspin up the middle or slightly left or right but not too close to the lines until I get a weak ball then I can hit a normal ball where I want and end the point.

Alot of people cant figure out what to do with a high topper down the middle. If somone has the answer to it, then Ill change my strat up, maybe play more traditional.