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View Full Version : High School and College Coaches how do you handle bad line calls ?


TheIrrefutableOne
01-30-2012, 08:39 PM
Coaches what do you tell your team do when they get bad line calls ?

BU-Tennis
01-30-2012, 09:51 PM
Back when I played/coached for my highschool, we all knew the schools which constantly had players who made bad lines calls...so we pretty much told all the kids when they think a bad call is made to get a line judge.

Getting a line judge is all you can do, but you also must realize a few bad calls will be made during every match, and I would say, depending on the opponent, almost all of them are honest mistakes.

Its almost more aggrevating watching one of your players constantly play out serves than watching them get hooked on a call, so I always tell people to not be afraid to make an out call when you think the ball is out.

5263
01-31-2012, 05:00 PM
First thing I do is instruct my players to not hit near the lines. It is a myth that you need to be close to the lines to hit winners and when it does happen it is often more of an accident than skill, even at the highest levels. When the ball is well clear of the lines, you rarely see bad calls. This is one of the few things you can do to take control of how calls will go.

Also, as the other poster says, get a line judge when needed.

TheIrrefutableOne
02-01-2012, 09:23 AM
What do you do if linesman are not an option, and your opponent calls a serve that is in by 18 inches, out ?

BU-Tennis
02-01-2012, 05:39 PM
Unfortunately, if a line judge is not available then you have no other option but to accept the call and move on...and using a coach often times as a line judge, while not the best situation because of obvious bias problems, is a great solution.

I am not sure what the code says about a player making obviously incorrect calls, maybe someone else can enlighten us about that.

kiteboard
02-01-2012, 06:04 PM
I had a guy, make a bad call on a passing shot, I hit, that was in by 12". He said, "Look, it left a mark" ,and pointed to a non existing mark outside the line.

I said, "The mark is right there.", and pointed to the mark it did leave. I got a referee, and then proceeded to hit near the lines a few times. He hesitated, and wanted to call them all out, but realized there was a ref. So he only called out he ones that the ref could not really see, but still cheated any time it was possible. Miserable playing a guy like that. Also miserable he was still able to cheat even with a ref there.

MLB_MOB
02-01-2012, 10:33 PM
In college we usually cheat or try to hit the opponent, both usually deter it from happening again

rkelley
02-02-2012, 08:38 AM
What do you do if linesman are not an option, and your opponent calls a serve that is in by 18 inches, out ?

There's always the Jim Courier method (i.e. hook him right back on blantantly obvious call, then ask if he'd like to continue the match in this fashion or not).

BU-Tennis
02-02-2012, 08:42 AM
The sad thing is, I had one guy on the tennis team in college, a total D-bag and no one likes him...Well anyway he was from the same state as me and his school was known for having a bunch of cheaters, and he said as long as the ball was a few feet near an outline, he would call it out on an important point

The moral of the story, people cheat..and I hate them...that is all

TheIrrefutableOne
02-02-2012, 07:24 PM
There's always the Jim Courier method (i.e. hook him right back on blantantly obvious call, then ask if he'd like to continue the match in this fashion or not).

I like this idea, however if I told my team to do this it could be a serious problem.

maverick66
02-02-2012, 08:14 PM
There's always the Jim Courier method (i.e. hook him right back on blantantly obvious call, then ask if he'd like to continue the match in this fashion or not).

have done this a few times. Even caught a ball after it bounced and called it out. Had a few matches get pretty nasty. It happens in sports and best thing to do is fight for the match and leave it there. Only a few times did it carry over off the court and I dont recommend that route.

Chyeaah
02-02-2012, 10:07 PM
Get a camera behind him and check the camera. If it is clearly in you win the point.

Some guy called my swinging volley going under the net, when it clearly was over the net

fuzz nation
02-07-2012, 10:14 AM
Get a camera behind him and check the camera. If it is clearly in you win the point.

Some guy called my swinging volley going under the net, when it clearly was over the net

Whoa, talk about creative calls, right?

Knowledge is power for the high school kids and having done it for several seasons with both varsity and JV groups of boys and girls, I've found that it's a huge help to talk things over with everyone on my team right before the start of their competitive season. Generally, the kids are really good eggs and a lot of them have never been faced with blatant cheaters, so they need to know how much control they have over the management of their own matches.

I try to convince everyone that they're going to blow a couple of calls per set and their opponents will, too. If they appreciate that, they'll let the occasional close one go and not get all distracted over it. It's not rare that an opponent actually gets several close calls right, even when we want to disagree with them. There's a difference when they're getting more blatantly hooked, though. Step one is to put some light on it and ask an opponent if they're sure, but to get some help if it keeps up.

As a coach, I'll never babysit another match while the rest of my team is competing, since it's my responsibility to watch and coach everyone. I did it once or twice and it was ridiculous because once I was standing by the net post, the rest of that match went off without a hitch. If two chuckleheads (or doub's teams) can't manage their own match and someone else isn't available to be the third party, I'll have those players sit down and finish the match after everyone else is done. If everyone flipped out and thought they were being cheated at the same time, we'd have to find four to six informal judges to watch each match. No thanks - these kids have responsibilities. If they can't handle it, they can default their match.

The other thing to give the kids a heads-up about is the tactic where an opponent will get really snippy and accuse them of cheating, just to get them rattled and out of their heads. Once I cover this, my kids have a night-and-day easier time with staying cool in that situation. The big tip off I tell them to look out for is whether the accusations come when those opponents are losing. They almost never do it when they're ahead.