PDA

View Full Version : What do you think about this stringing technique?


Litespeeds
02-02-2012, 05:42 PM
I have been stringing my racquet for almost 6 months now with a modified proportional string method.

Let's say I want to have a 50 lbs string job on a 16x20 frame. What I do is I pull the 2 center mains at 50 lbs, then the next hole is 49, then 48, 47, 45, 42, 38 and 32.

I start the crosses at 32, then to 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 48, 47, 46, 45, and so on.

When I do the string job this method and use a Gamma string tension meter to check the tension of the mains and crosses, they seem to be consistant throughout the racquet. All the mains register around 43lbs and all the crosses register around 30lbs.

When I string a racquet the regular way with 50 lbs all around, I find that the tensions towards the sides and upper and lower parts of the stringbed is tighter. This leads me to believe the sweet spot is smaller when strung the conventional way.

My question is:
Does my modified proportional stringjob open up the sweetspot? I know it is better for my arm when I mishit as the shock is not as harsh felt.

This definitely takes more time to string but I feel it is worth it. What are your thoughts?

ATP100
02-02-2012, 07:16 PM
If you like it, keep doing it. There a lot of reasons people will go into......blah blah blah.......go practice your strokes.

Davis Cup Fan
02-02-2012, 08:10 PM
Go with what you feel is best. If you like it strung that way and play well use it.

Irvin
02-03-2012, 04:24 AM
Does it open the sweet spot? I doubt it, but you think it does.

50 lbs hurts your arm but an average of 42.72222 feels softer and does not hurt your arm. Hummm? Why not just try 42 lbs? How did you come up with the tensions you have now? You could tune each string to the same frequency and as you do that your shorter strings will have a lower tension. The concept for determining your tension is explained here:

http://www.school-for-champions.com/science/sound_string_equation.htm

The concept has been around along time it is called proportional stringing but I myself have never tried it. Don't know if it works or not but it is too time consuming for me so I doubt I will ever try it unless of course someone want to pay for it. It would be nice if someone came up with a simple conversion table for length / tension / frequency.

You also have the JET (John Elliot Technique) method which is the same thing only different you may want to check out.

Irvin
02-03-2012, 07:33 AM
From looking at the link I listed above it appears the tension is directly proportional to the square of a string's length.

T = 4μLf

So all things being equal except for the length and tension (μ - string density and f - frequency desired) all you need to do is divide by the starting tension by the square of the center mains (assuming 4μf = quotient.) To find the tension of all the other strings use the length squared times quotient.

Irvin
02-03-2012, 10:11 AM
You are going to be very surprised by how far the tension drops to keep the same frequency.

For example, I used a Gamma IPEX 5.0 where the center mains are 32.2 cm long and the top cross is 15.8 cm long. So if I I divide the tension by the square of the length to get 4μf. Let's assume 60 lbs so 60/32.2 = 0.05787. So the tension on the top cross would be 15.8*0.05787 = 14.4 lbs.

Litespeeds
02-03-2012, 10:40 PM
http://tennisrocket.us/Stringing.aspx

Here is a Proportional String Calculator and I basically tried that on my racquet and initially it felt really weird and a little too much power and lack of control. Once I adjusted to it after 2 hours of hitting, I started to kind of like it as it was really pockets the ball.

I always notice that the crosses lose tension faster than the mains so I figure I would modify the cross tensions and bring the center area back to what the center mains are at. This way the strings will play more consistent for a longer period of time.

I guess for those have never tried proportional stringing or any modified form of it, you will never know how it feels but I do appreciate the feedback.

Irvin
02-04-2012, 01:48 AM
Thanks for the link I will check it out and some time. I like to try new methods of stringing.

Irvin
02-04-2012, 05:44 AM
It is pretty simple to see how his 'invention' works but it only works for a standard racket. If you have a fan type racket it does not work properly because the string length of the outside mains and top crosses will be way off and therefore the tension.

I am going to try this out and I will let you know how my testing works out. Thanks for the idea.

coachrick
02-04-2012, 08:29 AM
One advantage to being old is having fun stories to tell...One of Warren Bosworth's earliest 'claims to fame' was LOWERING the tension on the MIDDLE strings in rackets for Ken Rosewall. Rosewall gave Bosworth much credit for 'fixing' his racket during an event in the mid-'70s(by LOWERING the tension of the strings in the 'sweet spot' by 4lbs.). As Bosworth was building his 'street cred', he told that story many times. Until then, a stringer was just a guy who 'put strings in a racket' ;) .

RacquetDoctor
02-12-2012, 11:00 AM
One advantage to being old is having fun stories to tell...One of Warren Bosworth's earliest 'claims to fame' was LOWERING the tension on the MIDDLE strings in rackets for Ken Rosewall. Rosewall gave Bosworth much credit for 'fixing' his racket during an event in the mid-'70s(by LOWERING the tension of the strings in the 'sweet spot' by 4lbs.). As Bosworth was building his 'street cred', he told that story many times. Until then, a stringer was just a guy who 'put strings in a racket' ;) .

+1
The more things change, the more they stay the same. :)

Mark

Steve Huff
02-13-2012, 02:01 PM
I think it would work differently for different strings also. Strings stretch at different rates, so deflection angle is dependent on more variables than this can accomodate.

From personal experience, proportional stringing felt soft to me. Maybe I didn't crank up the mains high enough for my initial reference tension, as I think it was like 80-84 pounds. My last mains would have been in the high 30s. I've also tried the "drop 5# after every 2 per side" method too, starting the mains at 15# over reference tension. Couldn't tell much difference in play, strings didn't last as long, sweetspot may have been a little bigger--hard to tell.