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ace_pace
02-05-2012, 03:53 AM
Hi.

Im in a wierd situation. Im in this competition that runs weekly matches that make tennis clubs vs other tennis clubs. Each team has three players, each with their own respective rank i.e. 1,2,3. There is a total of 6 tennis games in the weekly matches consisting of 3 singles and 3 doubles. They are:
1 vs 1, 2 vs 2, 3 vs 3, 1&2 vs 1&2, 2&3 vs 2&3 and 1&3 vs 1&3.

Im ranked number 1. number 2 is also pretty good but number 3 is okay. The weird thing is when it comes to singles, we manage to win 2/3 or 3/3 singles, most of the time fairly easily. But when it comes to doubles, we lose by miles, especially me and number 2. We played really good singles but play badly in doubles. Hence why we usually lose the weekly matches because 50% of the competition is doubles. The team with the most Game points win the weekly match, not sets.

Its just plain confusing, I dont even know how we can stuff up. We communicate a fair bit. I dont know whats wrong?

joe sch
02-05-2012, 04:49 AM
How do you win most of your points in singles and how do you opponents win most of their points in doubles ?

The answer to these questions is probably the basis of why you dont understand
"why top singles players often do Not make good doubles players" !

What Im getting at is that your probably baseline players and not winning points with volleys. Learn how to volley better, poach, half/volley, hit offensive overheads, and play aggressive allcourt serve/volley tennis and you will for sure become a better singles player and start winning more points/games/sets/matches in doubles. Learn to signal in doubles so you can force yourselves to make aggressive volleys/poaches.

fruitytennis1
02-05-2012, 07:15 AM
Doubles is about high % first service and solid cross court returns. If you can do that on a consistent basis you've won 1/2 the game right there.

Off The Wall
02-05-2012, 09:52 AM
Hi.

Im in a wierd situation. Im in this competition that runs weekly matches that make tennis clubs vs other tennis clubs. Each team has three players, each with their own respective rank i.e. 1,2,3. There is a total of 6 tennis games in the weekly matches consisting of 3 singles and 3 doubles. They are:
1 vs 1, 2 vs 2, 3 vs 3, 1&2 vs 1&2, 2&3 vs 2&3 and 1&3 vs 1&3.

Im ranked number 1. number 2 is also pretty good but number 3 is okay. The weird thing is when it comes to singles, we manage to win 2/3 or 3/3 singles, most of the time fairly easily. But when it comes to doubles, we lose by miles, especially me and number 2. We played really good singles but play badly in doubles. Hence why we usually lose the weekly matches because 50% of the competition is doubles. The team with the most Game points win the weekly match, not sets.

Its just plain confusing, I dont even know how we can stuff up. We communicate a fair bit. I dont know whats wrong?

Congratulations! You've taken the first step to becoming a better doubles player by asking that age-old question: "WTF?!"

You're going to get a lot of good info here.

A good question to begin with is, "How are the better teams you play winning their points?" Are they at the net? There's a more than good chance they are.

You and your partner will need to think about the doubles info you'll get here. It's a journey; but every journey begins with thinking about taking the first step.

Nellie
02-05-2012, 03:07 PM
Doubles and singles are different games. With singles, you are generally avoiding mistakes whereas, in doubles, you are trying to win points. This leads to differences in strategy. For example, at of singles is about loopy top spin that gets destroyed in doubles.

Also, it takes practice to recognize good times to go for the poach and, as a partner, how to position yourself with your partner's poach.

ace_pace
02-05-2012, 03:35 PM
I just need to verify what poaching means. Does it mean when the Volleyer fakes intercepting the crosscourt pass?

SStrikerR
02-05-2012, 03:36 PM
No, a poach is intercepting the crosscourt shot. A fake poach is faking it.

ace_pace
02-05-2012, 04:09 PM
No, a poach is intercepting the crosscourt shot. A fake poach is faking it.

Lol yeah I meant that, I must have mixed up what I was trying to define.

LeeD
02-06-2012, 05:32 PM
For most players, it takes longer to figure out how to play doubles than it takes to figure out how to play singles.
I'd say, like 3 years for singles, another year and a half for doubles.

user92626
02-07-2012, 11:29 AM
There's nothing to figure out in doubles if you're already an expert in singles. Maybe you guys can only bash balls from baseline and do it very well. But doubles requires skillful volleying and poaching. My groundstrokes are much better than my bro in law and I beat him readily in only one singles set we played, but he could team up with virutally anyone and beat me in doubles. He reads shots flying by him at the net very well and volley effectively.

LeeD
02-07-2012, 11:35 AM
Different skill set and attitude.
More all court and precision low returns of serve in doubles.
Teamwork, support, making the game fun for the other player.

thug the bunny
02-07-2012, 11:58 AM
I know when I play dubs it always takes me time to adjust to how narrow the window is up at the net, and how wide it is down the sides, so for the first few games I get intercepted at net, and keep painting the singles lines. It's also much harder for me to really keep my eye on the ball with other people in my peripheral vision.

LeeD
02-07-2012, 12:01 PM
Don't look up or gaze at the opposition.
You KNOW where you should hit your ball, so hit it there. After you notice the netman cheating, PRE plan a DTL shot.
Smart netman plan to poach immediately AFTER they get burned DTL. So lob the next one.

r2473
02-07-2012, 12:23 PM
Why don't you both just play back? Play "singles doubles". You'll probably get the most games in that formation as that is the way you are comfortable playing.

LeeD
02-07-2012, 01:49 PM
I agree, if your net game is lacking, your best strategy is to use the tools that work for you.
Unfortunately, most agree there is an upper limit to playing both back, or 1up and one back, in doubles. When should you learn to play net? When should you learn to play as a doubles team?
Not important in 3.5, but 4.5 certainly shows 2 singles players would struggle against a doubles team.

Chyeaah
02-07-2012, 11:43 PM
It might also be you don't trust your partner or you trust your partner too much.

e.g you miss the ball but your partner trusts you too much he isn't 100% prepared. Or your partner doesn't trust you at all and takes all your easy put away shots to lengthen the point.

Also net play is important, if both of the other team are good at net play they will most likely always be on the offensive.

papa
02-08-2012, 05:21 AM
This isn't that unusual and we see if quite often especially with kids. Many times they play doubles llike its a couple of singles matches going on at once - they can get away with it up to a point but then everything comes apart.
Often, egos get involved and we see a lot of oink-oink tennis. You also see it frequently in mixed doubles where the male often wants to talke over - doesn't seem to matter if the female is better (up to a point anyway).

double barrels
02-08-2012, 06:06 AM
For most players, it takes longer to figure out how to play doubles than it takes to figure out how to play singles.
I'd say, like 3 years for singles, another year and a half for doubles.

when i started playing tennis it was all singles, then I started playing doubles, it was more exciting. Now, i am an excellent doubles player but I can't figure out how to play singles anymore haha. and i know I am a better singles player too, I got a reserve problem now

anchorage
02-08-2012, 06:18 AM
As some have said, doubles is a very different game and strategy. I learnt that, a bit like the OP, when my friend & I, both really singles players, entered a doubles tournament. We entered without having any particular strategy but are both decent volleyers & happy at the net.

Anyway, we got through two rounds and then came up against some real doubles players. That match was totally different from the previous two; they really played as a team, moving around the court together.

What really struck me was how few options we often had to execute percentage shots. For example, they would typically play deep approach shots, not particularly powerful, but always deep. From there, they really cut down the angles so that hitting a clean passing shot was not easy. Previously, we had always seen obvious gaps, often down the middle! Not against these guys, who seemed more like a brick wall.

In contrast, we gave them too many easy 'outs' because we didn't transition to the net the way they did. As a result, even if we got them under pressure, they had an easy escape route by playing back to the baseline player (that's why I think one up, one back ain't going to get you very far in doubles). There were many other examples with regard to general court positioning where we were caught out. Overall, we gave them too many easy points whereas they gave us very few, mainly due to our lack of doubles knowlege.

All in all, it was a bit of an education &, when you play against a team like that, you tend to have a lot more respect for good doubles play.