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View Full Version : best advice for lazy feet.


2ndServe
02-05-2012, 10:28 AM
I hit the ball ok but my footwork is just very poor.

Larrysümmers
02-05-2012, 11:17 AM
dont stop moving your feet

InspectorRacquet
02-05-2012, 11:27 AM
dont stop moving your feet

Pretty simple, but "move your feet" is pretty vague.

Overexaggerate moving your feet, always staying on your toes when waiting for the ball and never standing flat footed when you're not hitting the shot. This worked for me. Split stepping when your opponent hits the ball is crucial, too, because split stepping too late causes rushed footwork.

dabudabuda
02-05-2012, 11:28 AM
I would say put extra focus on making sure to land your split step at the moment your opponent makes contact with the ball. When I feel slow reacting it is usually me lagging, even if just a little, with my split step. It allows me to better see the direction of the ball off the opponents racket because I am more intensely watching the ball longer for the timing of the split thus am able to be more aggressive with the first step in the direction of the ball and that sharpness tends to carry over into positioning myself to hit the ball.

Larrysümmers
02-05-2012, 11:37 AM
Pretty simple, but "move your feet" is pretty vague.

Overexaggerate moving your feet, always staying on your toes when waiting for the ball and never standing flat footed when you're not hitting the shot. This worked for me. Split stepping when your opponent hits the ball is crucial, too, because split stepping too late causes rushed footwork.

so basically, not stopping the movement of your feet

onehandbh
02-05-2012, 12:42 PM
Hot coals.

danno123
02-05-2012, 12:53 PM
I struggle with the same problem. My natural inclination is to hit the ball and stand flat-footed like I'm waiting for a bus. To remedy this, I've been trying to split step every time my opponent hits the ball, especially during the warm up. I also occasionally "play points in my mind" and visualize the way my feet should move. It's helped a little but my footwork still sucks and will until I get my knee problem fixed (my left vmo is not firing and good footwork hurts).

InspectorRacquet
02-05-2012, 12:59 PM
so basically, not stopping the movement of your feet

But, like I said, that is way too vague to solve a problem. Moving your feet can be interpreted in many ways, and I sought to provide a specific explanation. It's similar to a player who hits an inconsistent forehand - you can't just tell him or her to be more consistent.

Nostradamus
02-05-2012, 01:00 PM
Problem i have is i often forget to move my feet. especially in between points. How do i remind myself during the match ?

Bergboy123
02-05-2012, 01:36 PM
Well we often see Andy Murray hitting his thighs and screaming when he wants to remind himself to move his feet. I wouldn't suggest this drastic method, but typically when I go into a mach I have a select few things that I constantly think of, like a to-do list. For example, I will tell myself frequently throughout a match (between points, changeovers, before I serve,) "Move your feet, hug the baseline, and hit through the ball!"

Having a few things in mind doesn't really distract me, but instead helps me. If it's fresh in my mind, muscle control and memory then can click in and help me out during the points where I'm more focused on the ball.

Nostradamus
02-05-2012, 01:46 PM
Well we often see Andy Murray hitting his thighs and screaming when he wants to remind himself to move his feet. I wouldn't suggest this drastic method, but typically when I go into a mach I have a select few things that I constantly think of, like a to-do list. For example, I will tell myself frequently throughout a match (between points, changeovers, before I serve,) "Move your feet, hug the baseline, and hit through the ball!"

Having a few things in mind doesn't really distract me, but instead helps me. If it's fresh in my mind, muscle control and memory then can click in and help me out during the points where I'm more focused on the ball.

Thank you. like the move your feet, hit thru the ball part. What about a Sticky note on the racket to tell you to move your feet.

gindyo
02-05-2012, 01:54 PM
Buy yourself a heart rate monitor set it up to beep when your pulse drops below 65%-70% of your max HR and don't let it beep :)

10sLifer
02-05-2012, 02:09 PM
I hit the ball ok but my footwork is just very poor.

Some times it's actually a visual problem. Since your vision decreases when you are moving say to 20/100 people like to be still so they track the ball better. Try to snap yourself out of it and just do something. Turn, get to the general area of the ball even if you don't know exactly where it is going.

"Don't stare. Prepare!"

stormholloway
02-05-2012, 02:49 PM
so basically, not stopping the movement of your feet

No sense in trying to defend your advice. Inspector's was far more specific. The OP could lay on the ground wiggling his toes. That's moving his feet too, but does it help?

In other words it's one thing to give half-assed advice but to criticize someone else for expounding on that is silly.

Frank Silbermann
02-05-2012, 03:28 PM
dont stop moving your feet That doesn't work so well for someone who is in his 90s. Efficient movement is the key.

charliefedererer
02-05-2012, 06:09 PM
I hit the ball ok but my footwork is just very poor.

You need to move out of a split step.

If you jump into a spit step each and every time your opponent strikes the ball, you will be ready and balanced to move forward, backward or to the right or left.

Ian from Essential Tennis has just produced three free videos on the split step as a key for better footwork. I highly recommend watching all three and incorporating moving out of a split into your game: http://essentialtennis.com/

Larrysümmers
02-05-2012, 07:09 PM
No sense in trying to defend your advice. Inspector's was far more specific. The OP could lay on the ground wiggling his toes. That's moving his feet too, but does it help?

In other words it's one thing to give half-assed advice but to criticize someone else for expounding on that is silly.

lmao okay chief

danno123
02-06-2012, 01:11 PM
I played this morning and notice that my footwork is ok when I'm on the defensive but absolutely sucks when I hit a good shot. When I hit a really nice shot, I like to just stand there and admire it when I should be moving (and usually should be moving up). I think it's like anything you learn in sports - you have to consciously practice it until it's a habit and you no longer have to consciously do it (and then you have to occasionally consciously practice it to keep it a habit).

ohplease
02-06-2012, 01:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6v1AHFnca8

After every hit, look at what both Graf and Petrovic's feet are doing - they both take 3 steps, split step, then take some more steps to position for themselves for the next hit - and repeat. It's just about always 3 steps after hitting - doesn't matter if they're in the center of the court, or pushing hard to recover from a corner.

forthegame
02-06-2012, 01:29 PM
Moving your feet is tiresome! easy to say, harder to do, IMHO.
Can't keep it up, I guess the bottomline is I (and probably the OP) need to get fitter.

enicho38
02-06-2012, 08:01 PM
lmao okay chief

EASYYY there, bud. It's only a message board!

Cheetah
02-06-2012, 10:55 PM
off topic but... that vid of steffi was awesome. she looks great.

Povl Carstensen
02-06-2012, 11:41 PM
Lighter shoes.

fuzz nation
02-07-2012, 09:31 AM
The thing I did a few years ago to improve my footwork was to use very heavy, very soft "training racquets", but only on the practice courts. I could only produce consistently good shots with those racquets if I deliberately rushed my set up to the hitting zone off my split-step. That led me toward earlier preparation and better swing timing more often, since I couldn't be late or lazy with those tree trunks - they were too heavy to "muscle" or "arm" to the ball for more than a few minutes.

Lots of folks aren't wild about this idea, but it worked great for me when I was rebuilding better habits for my ground strokes. Even without the heavy trainers, I think that players can fixate on that idea of a quick first move in the instant that the ball is struck from the other end. It can become a more natural habit in the same way that we simply fixate on watching the ball as best we can.

GuyClinch
02-07-2012, 10:18 AM
Jump rope. It will train you to stay on the balls of your feet -which is actually fairly tiring if you are not in decent shape.

It's very easy to get lazy if your a big guy and just find yourself standing around. You might not notice it unless you video tape yourself..

forthegame
02-07-2012, 02:07 PM
Jump rope. It will train you to stay on the balls of your feet -which is actually fairly tiring if you are not in decent shape.

It's very easy to get lazy if your a big guy and just find yourself standing around. You might not notice it unless you video tape yourself..

This is so true! I encourage everyone to do this at least once, I was shocked at how static I was. When I play, I believe I'm moving but on video.... A wake up call.

LeeD
02-07-2012, 03:00 PM
Work on moving the feet, but be sure to turn your shoulders. Cause and effect.

netguy
09-18-2012, 10:08 PM
Jump rope. It will train you to stay on the balls of your feet -which is actually fairly tiring if you are not in decent shape.

It's very easy to get lazy if your a big guy and just find yourself standing around. You might not notice it unless you video tape yourself..

I agree, jump rope is the way to go!
2000 to 5000 jumps a day is the deal :)

syke
09-19-2012, 12:14 AM
Enrol yourself in some dancing classes