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tennis_pr0
02-08-2012, 07:55 AM
So as many of you have seen from my videos, I have been working hard at making my backhand more of a weapon. After the last few months of working with it, I have decided to switch to a two handed backhand. Yesterday, I hit about 2,000 balls on the ball machine, making adjustments throughout, and it started feeling very good.

Over the next month, I will continue to work hard with it, and I will post a few videos periodically. I am hoping to start playing some futures this year, so I am hoping in a few months my backhand will be where I want it to. Just thought I would share this with you guys, and I will post a video soon! Thanks

rkelley
02-08-2012, 08:43 AM
Your one hander was not a bad shot. Good luck with the transition.

Limpinhitter
02-09-2012, 06:23 PM
The key is to understand that a 2hb is really a left handed forehand. Even though your right hand is on the handle, you should let it be as passive as you can and emulate the swing of your right hand forehand, WW finish and all. And keep your hands and wrists loose and relaxed.

BevelDevil
02-09-2012, 08:28 PM
Unless he wants an Agassi swing, which is much more right-arm dominant than a conventional 2hbh. Reminds me of a left-handed golf swing, both arms forming a triangle through contact.

http://www.tennisplayer.net/public/avancedtennis/two_handed_backhand/2hd_bh_simplest_complex/Copy%20of%202hd_bh_simplest_complex.html

I always wondered if this should be the preferred 2hbh for people transitioning from a good 1hbh to a 2-hander.

gregor.b
02-09-2012, 08:30 PM
So as many of you have seen from my videos, I have been working hard at making my backhand more of a weapon. After the last few months of working with it, I have decided to switch to a two handed backhand. Yesterday, I hit about 2,000 balls on the ball machine, making adjustments throughout, and it started feeling very good.

Over the next month, I will continue to work hard with it, and I will post a few videos periodically. I am hoping to start playing some futures this year, so I am hoping in a few months my backhand will be where I want it to. Just thought I would share this with you guys, and I will post a video soon! Thanks

I am with you mate. The race is on. I will post when I can get fully back on the court and we can compare.

tennis_pr0
02-09-2012, 09:41 PM
I actually decided to stay with the one handed after making a few valuable adjustments.

Geology_Rocks!
02-10-2012, 07:01 AM
I actually decided to stay with the one handed after making a few valuable adjustments.

I have the backhand debate with myself every month. So far I'm keeping the one handed.

But what you said is very true, when my one handed is off for sure I'm doing something wrong and a little ajustment is needed.

rkelley
02-10-2012, 07:32 AM
Personally, I have total confidence in my own ability to make either one suck. Seriously, there are inherent strengths and weaknesses for either one. They both can work, and they both can be hit poorly. I was hitting my two hander quite poorly last night for a lot of the time. I compensated by consistently nailing the top of the tape with my one handed slice. Consistency is the key to this game.

Netspirit
02-10-2012, 10:04 AM
The key is to understand that a 2hb is really a left handed forehand. Even though your right hand is on the handle, you should let it be as passive as you can and emulate the swing of your right hand forehand, WW finish and all. And keep your hands and wrists loose and relaxed.

Why do you need the right hand at all then?

LeeD
02-10-2012, 10:09 AM
A "passive" main hand can still help to guide and make last minute adjustments, if needed. And two handed, it's hard to just "arm" your swing, as your body likes to sway with the swing.

gregor.b
02-10-2012, 11:19 AM
I actually decided to stay with the one handed after making a few valuable adjustments.

The only reason I am changing is because of injury. As far as I and my coach and hitting partners can tell, there is no change or issue with (1 hbh ) technique. Believe me, it is a big call for me to go away from my best shot and replace it with something I have never done before. 3 months off the court and I can't take it anymore. I am over it to the point where I change something or give it up. I have invested too much time and money in myself and the children to give give it all away now. Also, I am finding at the higher levels you really need to have more ability to hit the high ball hard and the really low ball even harder, rather than slicing. Some of these kids coming up today just absolutely monster the ball unless you take their time away.

rkelley
02-10-2012, 11:44 AM
Why do you need the right hand at all then?

As another perspective on this issue, I also hit a left hand dominated 2hbh. I think I understand what Limp is trying to convey in that you want your left hand to control the shot. I often am telling myself to keep a loose grip with my right hand and let my left hand control the racquet. In that sense one could say the right hand is passive.

However in my opinion the right hand is contributing to the power of the stroke. It is not passive from the standpoint that it isn't doing anything. In most pro backhands the right arm (for righties) is roughly in line with the racquet at contact. The arm is basically pulling on the racquet, helping create torque to drive the racquet head forward. You can clearly see the muscles in their right arms working, so the arm isn't passive.

In my experience if you don't have enough right hand in the shot, the shot becomes weak and unstable. You can't get good racquet head speed, so you can't get good topspin and/or you can't drive the ball. It basically becomes a bad left handed forehand. One of the whole advantages of the 2hbh is the triangle that is formed by the two arms and the body creating a very strong hitting structure.

The only time I personally use almost no right hand is if I'm just bunting the ball back over the net, which is not something I ever do in an actual rally (if I want to hit a soft backhand in a rally I go with a one handed slice).

Limpinhitter
02-10-2012, 03:03 PM
Why do you need the right hand at all then?

Eye-hand coordination!

LeeD
02-10-2012, 03:43 PM
Post 10.
You don't see many 2hbh's just "arm" the stroke, do you?

Netspirit
02-10-2012, 05:52 PM
LeeD, that's a stupid argument. Players can be taught to use whatever technique is optimal. You don't see many pros "arming" forehands either.

I understand how the second arm adds weight and stability to the shot, but the drawbacks are equally obvious, which makes me wonder why nobody has attempted to unleash the left arm alone, when it makes sense tactically.

LeeD
02-10-2012, 07:14 PM
Actually, my point is based on almost 40 years of playing and watching tennis....:)
Letting go creates more problems than it solves. There is a thread here about that, just go down the page and look for it.
What's the NUMBER ONE problem with 3.5 player's vids? They ARM their strokes, either side. What's the biggest cure? Use the body with rotation.
2hbh, you use the body with rotation, I'm not so stupid, am I?
Having two forehands only makes sense for players without good backhands, like most inexperienced players.

ho
02-11-2012, 08:03 AM
2hbh, you use the body with rotation, I'm not so stupid, am I?

Absolutely NO, Mr Lee, what is stupid first start from some well know book, from some well know self claiming they are the greatest
tennis coach of all time. From that on, many of us have start up with : 2hbh is just a left hand forehand (including me for the first couple of years).
The way I see it, No pro hit 2HBH with arms.
Good bye: Left hand , right hand, 80% this 50% this , straight arm, chicken wing , left hand dominant, right hand dominant......that i been go thru couple years back.
None of them will bring you to the higher level if you still think 2HBH is hitted with arms...
Come to think of it, why do I hit with a small muscle instead of a big muscle ??? Am I stupid or what....

ho
02-11-2012, 08:19 AM
I understand how the second arm adds weight and stability to the shot, but the drawbacks are equally obvious, which makes me wonder why nobody has attempted to unleash the left arm alone, when it makes sense tactically.
Forget all of these, start a new mechanic: put your elbows on your rib cages, rotate your body, at contact push out both hand. That all to it. You will see how much improvement you get in term of power and consistency.

To add speed, kick your left foot up to start your forward swing, make sure your shoulder under the chin in the take back.

I got to tell you, It was so simple that you cannot make any mistake.

rkelley
02-11-2012, 08:58 AM
Forget all of these, start a new mechanic: put your elbows on your rib cages, rotate your body, at contact push out both hand. That all to it. You will see how much improvement you get in term of power and consistency.

To add speed, kick your left foot up to start your forward swing, make sure your shoulder under the chin in the take back.

I got to tell you, It was so simple that you cannot make any mistake.

Actually this is really good, basic advice, except for the left foot thing which I don't understand. (I really like the dominant shoulder touching the chin to enforce the shoulder turn). Sometimes we over-analyze these things to death.

ho
02-11-2012, 10:44 AM
Actually this is really good, basic advice, except for the left foot thing which I don't understand. (I really like the dominant shoulder touching the chin to enforce the shoulder turn). Sometimes we over-analyze these things to death.
When you kick your left foot up, you rotate your hip, even you don't like it.

rkelley
02-11-2012, 12:13 PM
When you kick your left foot up, you rotate your hip, even you don't like it.

Are you referring to the foot work where you bring the back leg around (left leg for a right handed player) after contact and end the stroke in an open stance? That foot work helps you fully rotate your hips into the shot and allows you to end the stroke ready for the next shot.

Or is it something else?