PDA

View Full Version : Shaving down a grip from 4 5/8 to 4 1/2?


top__spin
02-08-2012, 01:40 PM
Is this possible?
Has anyone done this before?

Any thoughts/comments will be appreciated.

ChicagoJack
02-08-2012, 03:18 PM
Man, there is a lot that can go wrong with that. Rounded off bevels, uneven faces, inconsistent from center etc... What racquet do you have? some pallets are inter-changeable. Don't know if you've considered other options, but a thinner grip .... or no grip, and two overgrips might do the trick.

corners
02-08-2012, 03:31 PM
I brought a foam pallet down one size once. It was tricky and the result was not perfect. I wouldn't recommend it unless you have no other options. I think even selling your current frame and re-buying the smaller handle size is a better option than getting out your vernier calipers and sandpaper.

lgbalfa
02-08-2012, 04:43 PM
i had mine done from one grip size to another.

4 3/8 to 4 1/4.

but i had RPNY do it as it seemed too complicated.

LeeD
02-08-2012, 04:49 PM
Can be done, but a good job would require woodworking tools. $$$$$$\
WAAAY cheaper to pay the 75 bucks to have someone else handle the job.

tlm
02-08-2012, 07:25 PM
I can't believe that you guys are making a big deal out of bringing a grip down one size. I have done this many times and it is not very difficult.

All you need is a fine flat file, carefully keep file flat on each section and slowly remove a little at a time. Just try to remove the same amount off each section. It does not take a lot of material removed to reduce one size.

Andyroo10567
02-08-2012, 07:55 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJfhKEt_4nQ

rufusbgood
02-08-2012, 08:41 PM
Is this possible?
Has anyone done this before?

Any thoughts/comments will be appreciated.

If the handle is made of urethane foam it is possible to reduce the size.

If the handle is just a continuation of the frame (hollow graphite) then your only option is to follow the instructions in post #2.

As stated in prior posts you can do this with hand tools if you are careful. I have never felt comfortable with this idea. I use this:

http://i43.tinypic.com/36o2.jpg

top__spin
02-08-2012, 08:48 PM
Thanks for all the replies guys!

I use a Donnay X-Black 94. The reason why I was asking if you could shave it down is because I use a 4 1/2 grip size. I already have 2 o fhtme and I was just looking for an extra, 3rd racquet to keep. I only found a 4 5/8 size so far. Looks like no one's selling them anymore. So, I was considering getting the 5/8 and shaving it down.

vsdtrek
02-08-2012, 10:19 PM
Try a Babolat Skin Feel grip as that is very thin.

cork_screw
02-08-2012, 10:26 PM
I personally wouldn't bother. Because it's so hard to get each side identical. With the same amount of pressure applied to all sides, there's bound to be a lot of problems. I wouldn't bother with it. Even if you think you're doing it right, the grip will be off. I don't know if you use a machine to do it, if it would be any better.

Someone I know tried to do it from a 1/2 to 1/4 and at the end it looked like if someone tried to lick an ice cream cone into a perfect rectangle. It looks really off.

klementine79
02-08-2012, 11:49 PM
Couldn't you just remove the foam pallet and order a pallet from R...p..n..y..? Install it yourself.

Hi I'm Ray
02-09-2012, 02:49 AM
It could be done with small woodworking plane (with the bottom actually flat, most off the shelf models are not!) adjusted for a very thin shaving. With a plane one can see the how even each shaving comes off. But it takes some experience and skill.

I wouldn't trust even results with a file or sanding block, a little uneven pressure whether it be downward or side to side can add up with the number of strokes it takes to thin one bevel down, there's bound to be some "wind." Then multiply that by 8 sides.

Generally, I wouldn't recommend it.

tlm
02-09-2012, 04:33 AM
I love all these experts that wouldn't recommend it, but have never actually tried it. This is not surgery here boys, this is removing a small amount of material from the handle.

Before you start measure what the handle is with the grip removed, then remove enough material until it is 1/8" less. Just go a little at a time and do the same amount of strokes on each section.

Once the grip is removed and i start the planing it usually takes maybe 10 minutes, it is very easy. If each section is not exactly perfect, which by the way the factory job is not either by the time you put the grip back on it will never be noticed.

You guys really think that with a grip and over wrap on the handle that you are going to notice if there are a few miniscule differences in the handle? That is hilarious, i guarantee i could do a racket and none of you could tell the difference if compared to a factory racket.


Take some old junk rackets and try a few first before you do your main stick, then you will see how easy it is.

Hi I'm Ray
02-09-2012, 05:52 AM
I've tried it once, and I'm not claiming to be some expert at it. I'm willing to bet most ppl will screw up, especially if its their first time doing anything of the sort.

I'm also not willing to trust this tlm is some expert on this either. But hey, if you want to trust a guy who says, hey it's easy as hell, just do it, I bet you can't tell if its lopsided (<--wow, that helps, lol.) - go right ahead, it sure doesn't affect me.

jorel
02-09-2012, 06:53 AM
buy a 4 1/2

tlm
02-09-2012, 02:34 PM
I've tried it once, and I'm not claiming to be some expert at it. I'm willing to bet most ppl will screw up, especially if its their first time doing anything of the sort.

I'm also not willing to trust this tlm is some expert on this either. But hey, if you want to trust a guy who says, hey it's easy as hell, just do it, I bet you can't tell if its lopsided (<--wow, that helps, lol.) - go right ahead, it sure doesn't affect me.


Okay you say you tried it once how did it come out? I did suggest to try it the first time on a junk racket so you can get the hang of it. If you have a few junk rackets to practice on the do that, because it does not take that long and after doing a few you should have no problem.

I never claimed to be an expert on this, but i do think that it is not that hard to do. I do work with my hands and have done some fine filing and sanding before, but with a little practice i think most people could accomplish this easy task.

I guess if a guy has only used a key pad and has never worked with any tools in his life or is a total spas then maybe it would be to hard. But believe me this is not that technical. You would have to do a pretty bad job to really notice that it was off.

But i guess it is easier for most to just say it is to hard and it will never work, thats fine then go pay someone big money to do an easy job and get ripped off.

li0scc0
02-09-2012, 05:13 PM
Can be done, but a good job would require woodworking tools. $$$$$$\
WAAAY cheaper to pay the 75 bucks to have someone else handle the job.

Or $10. most shops do it for that.

li0scc0
02-09-2012, 05:15 PM
I can't believe that you guys are making a big deal out of bringing a grip down one size. I have done this many times and it is not very difficult.

All you need is a fine flat file, carefully keep file flat on each section and slowly remove a little at a time. Just try to remove the same amount off each section. It does not take a lot of material removed to reduce one size.

I am pretty handy. i have done metal fabrication, mechanical work, woodwork, etc. Taking a grip down was something I messed up...badly. Leave it to people who have done this 100 times or more.

tlm
02-09-2012, 08:09 PM
I am pretty handy. i have done metal fabrication, mechanical work, woodwork, etc. Taking a grip down was something I messed up...badly. Leave it to people who have done this 100 times or more.


Okay whatever you say, this is such a difficult job. It must be really high tech, even though you say that most shops charge $10. Wow i can see how intricate this must be i mean it is less than half of the cost of a string job, and we all know how intricate it is to string a racket.

I give up, this is such a difficult job that i would advise that nobody should even think about attempting this super intricate high tech job that you would need thousands of dollars of high tech tools and many years of experience. I mean if you have not done at least 3000 rackets just forget about it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

lgbalfa
02-09-2012, 08:13 PM
as i stated before, i had RPNY reduce my racquets one grip size.

they do not do it by hand, they use a special machine.

it was not cheap.

about $75 / racquet. i had three done.

some people i am sure have done or can do it but if you are not confident like most, just pay an expert like i did so you do not ruin the racquet.

snoopy
02-09-2012, 08:19 PM
I used a file on my Leatherman to shave down a Wilson frame from 4 1/2 to whatever I wound up feeling comfortable with. It has to be around a 4 1/4 now.

It's not hard to do. I wouldn't do this on a frame I planned on reselling or a frame that's very expensive. The result isn't perfect, but it has no adverse effects on how I play. I'm playing much better now that I have the proper grip size.

tlm
02-09-2012, 08:24 PM
as i stated before, i had RPNY reduce my racquets one grip size.

they do not do it by hand, they use a special machine.

it was not cheap.

about $75 / racquet. i had three done.

some people i am sure have done or can do it but if you are not confident like most, just pay an expert like i did so you do not ruin the racquet.


I would bet you all the money you wasted on being ripped off for $75 a racket that i could have done one by hand and you would never be able to tell which one i did and which one RPNY did.

li0scc0
02-10-2012, 09:49 AM
I would bet you all the money you wasted on being ripped off for $75 a racket that i could have done one by hand and you would never be able to tell which one i did and which one RPNY did.

No, I would be able to tell the difference between one RPNY did and one you did.
But i would not be able to tell the difference between RPNY's $75 job and my local shop's $10 job.
It takes practice. You don't have that practice, nor do I. Do a few dozen and get it right, then yes, it won't take long and you will do a great job. As would I.

evantsung
02-10-2012, 12:34 PM
Some people are afraid to experiment, so they just write it off as not doable. Or some people are perfectionists, so if the result is not perfect, then it's not worth doing. I'm a little unconventional, so I'll try anything before giving up. I've heard that you're not supposed to restring only the cross, repair a cracked racket, down a grip size by sanding, or putting Head pallets on other brands. I've done all the above with success to my level of satisfaction. May not be perfect to some people, but I'm happy with the results. Like tlm said, it's not brain surgery.
I've sanded the grip size of a TXE from a 5 to a 3. Took a sanding block and sanded each side with one stroke all around, then repeat. You'll get used to the pressure needed to match all sides. Someone also suggested using sharpie as a guide to how much material is being taken off, which I regret not following. Afterwards, I used a micrometer to do all kinds of measurements to see if everything came out evenly. Guess what, it didn't. Some of the faces ended up a tad wider than the others. I'm talking about less then 1 mm. I did not proceed to junk the racquet bc I screwed up, but instead put the buttcap and leather back on and went to the court. Racquet functioned and the grip felt fine. Can't noticed the minute difference in width on each face with the grip on. The only issue is that the resell value may drop bc of the modifications.
My point is, anything is doable, but are you willing to settle for some imperfections and variance in the result.

jorel
02-13-2012, 05:35 AM
as i stated before, i had RPNY reduce my racquets one grip size.

they do not do it by hand, they use a special machine.

it was not cheap.

about $75 / racquet. i had three done.

some people i am sure have done or can do it but if you are not confident like most, just pay an expert like i did so you do not ruin the racquet.
for that price. i would just buy a new racquet...unless its discont.

drakulie
02-13-2012, 06:00 AM
I agree with tlm. We do this at our shop. Not too complicated as long as you use common sense and patience.

tlm
02-14-2012, 07:39 PM
I agree with tlm. We do this at our shop. Not too complicated as long as you use common sense and patience.


Exactly these guys make this out to be some high tech job. Taking your time is key and having an older junk racket to experiment on is definitely a good idea.

I mark were i start and put a arrow to show which direction to keep rotating the handle, usually i take 2 light and easy strokes on each section to start and measure after each time around.

What is surprising is how little material is actually removed to go down 1 grip size, it does not take very much.

lgbalfa
02-14-2012, 08:36 PM
in the middle of my handle, i had about a 3" graphite strip.

while you can file down foam, i think attempting to file down graphite in the middle would be too hard to do it by yourself without special equipment.

top__spin
02-15-2012, 12:30 PM
Thanks for all your input/replies!

I dunno...I'd really like all my racquets to be as perfectly similar to eachother as possible.
So, I guess I'm just going to look for a 4 1/2.
May be when I have some time I'll attempt shaving down on one of my old racquets when I won't be using them any more.

Thanks again...I appreciate the help!

Or Tennis
02-18-2012, 09:42 PM
I completely agree with what tlm said. Using a sanding block with fine sandpaper I was able to reduce my ProStaff 6.1 Classic's foam grip from size 4 to 3. With all due respect I think 1mm is too much of a tolerance. As tlm alluded to, the factory grips aren't always perfect. I felt that I achieved sharper bevels and flatter surfaces and I was very satisfied with the results. My recommendation is to use full, even strokes on each surface, working on the biggest surfaces first.