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View Full Version : Serving with SW grip!!!


xsmasher
02-15-2012, 09:01 AM
What is the pros and cons of serving with this grip..I get everything ok with this grip except the follow through.. Power,spin and location is ok. But sometimes I refer my shoulder pain to this grip😥

r2473
02-15-2012, 09:12 AM
Can I ask you how on earth you hit a serve with a SW grip?

xsmasher
02-15-2012, 09:38 AM
am used to it since I started playing two years ago..and am not alone

dominikk1985
02-15-2012, 10:11 AM
Can I ask you how on earth you hit a serve with a SW grip?

A lot of "housewife players" use that grip. It's also called frying pan grip. of course this is not very athletic because you cannot pronate the wrist into the shot. you basically just push the ball over the net.

many badminton beginner play like this too.

r2473
02-15-2012, 10:34 AM
^^ The frying pan grip is the the "eastern" grip (I actually can't imagine picking up a frying pan with a SW grip).

But I really can't imagine serving with a SW grip. I was just messing around in my office with that grip and doing the service motion. No idea how that would work.

mikeler
02-15-2012, 11:20 AM
^^ The frying pan grip is the the "eastern" grip (I actually can't imagine picking up a frying pan with a SW grip).

But I really can't imagine serving with a SW grip. I was just messing around in my office with that grip and doing the service motion. No idea how that would work.


Would work great for a screwball (reverse slice) style spin serve. Never hurts to add more bush league shots to your game ya know.

Chace
02-15-2012, 12:13 PM
To the OP, you won't get nearly as good of a wrist snap with a sw grip. But as Mikeler said it is good when trying to throw in the screwball serve.

sureshs
02-15-2012, 12:15 PM
Yes, great for creating reverse slice and dislocated shoulders.

WildVolley
02-15-2012, 02:25 PM
A player of mine in the past used this grip. He would hit a reverse slice motion across the back of the ball. It looked painful to me, but I guess he wasn't swinging fast enough to do much damage to his shoulder.

You can pronate across the back of the ball with this motion, but you have to rotate your body into an awkward position.

Take a little time and learn how to serve with the continental. It will give you many more options and allow you to develop more power.

LeeD
02-15-2012, 03:04 PM
Seen it effective up to higher playground pickup levels, but you can never hit a real fast serve or a serve with tons of spin. Just too hard on the ball joint.
Nice to have as a variety to be pulled out once a set, on set point.

Xizel
02-15-2012, 04:34 PM
If a few degrees messes up a Continental first serve, this serve is many times worse. The consistency for this flat serve is more luck-based than anything I've seen. However, I don't deny its effectiveness. The ball has a slight amount of underspin on it that causes it to skid and very hard to time and hit up on. However, there's no such thing as a SW second serve. There's no topspin to control more pace, so penetration is limited. Feel free to smack away.

pvaudio
02-15-2012, 07:44 PM
^^ The frying pan grip is the the "eastern" grip (I actually can't imagine picking up a frying pan with a SW grip).

But I really can't imagine serving with a SW grip. I was just messing around in my office with that grip and doing the service motion. No idea how that would work.I'm afraid the other poster is right. The Western/SW is the frying pan grip. The Eastern is the "pancake" grip. Think about how you pick up a pan. You have your palm on the side/bottom of the grip. If you picked up a pan with an Eastern grip, your palm would be on top of the handle meaning you're putting most of the weight on your fingers rather than using your arm.

SystemicAnomaly
02-16-2012, 01:29 AM
Is your goal to damage your shoulder/arm? Why even attempt this?

Fuji
02-18-2012, 07:06 PM
Would work great for a screwball (reverse slice) style spin serve. Never hurts to add more bush league shots to your game ya know.

My entire game is bush league shots, what more do you really need in tennis? :lol:

-Fuji

OrangePower
02-18-2012, 10:09 PM
What is the pros and cons of serving with this grip..I get everything ok with this grip except the follow through.. Power,spin and location is ok. But sometimes I refer my shoulder pain to this grip��

Cons: Can't consistently generate higher levels of power and spin; shoulder surgery is painful and expensive.

Pros: Easy to learn

Shruf
02-20-2012, 05:07 PM
^^ The frying pan grip is the the "eastern" grip (I actually can't imagine picking up a frying pan with a SW grip).

But I really can't imagine serving with a SW grip. I was just messing around in my office with that grip and doing the service motion. No idea how that would work.
It's basically like hitting a forehand except it's overhead. My friend does it =P

SStrikerR
02-20-2012, 05:48 PM
When people say "I don't see how you hit a serve or backhand with SW grip" I don't think they're taking into consideration that obviously the person using SW isn't using normal mechanics on their stroke....

I used SW for literally everything when I first started and didn't know different grips. I'm not saying my game was good or anything (it wasn't) but it's doable, you just won't have the same mechanics.

LeeD
02-21-2012, 11:27 AM
Don't matter mechanics or whatever, a SW gripped serve is for beginners playing against beginners. Once you hit 4.0 level, everyone will tee off on your serve to that side.

Ash_Smith
02-21-2012, 12:25 PM
I coach a few players who serve with a SW grip, one is number 1 in the world, another is 12 in the world and the third is 18 in the world...

Can anyone figure it out?! :)

Cheers

dman72
02-21-2012, 12:30 PM
You can't put any spin (other than a slice screwball spin) on the ball so it's best to stop now and learn to serve with a continental.

I have a friend who has pretty solid strokes who was a decent high school doubles player growing up. He serves like this and it's a complete disaster. We don't play sets because his serve is so bad he will lose every service game, so when I hit with him it's just points. I tried everything I can to help him develop a real serve but the bad habit is too ingrained at this point in his life.

r2473
02-21-2012, 12:32 PM
I coach a few players who serve with a SW grip, one is number 1 in the world, another is 12 in the world and the third is 18 in the world...

Can anyone figure it out?! :)

Cheers



I'm sitting in my office chair and pretending I'm using the SW grip to serve. That would actually work. Better than Conti.

LeeD
02-21-2012, 12:33 PM
Ash. They use the other side of the racket.
But I call it a conti grip well twisted towards eBackhand.

Ash_Smith
02-21-2012, 12:37 PM
r2473 is closest, sorry LeeD!

They are quad division wheelchair players and because of their various injuries they have limited function of their upper extremities, which usually manifests itself in a lack of grip strength. Therefore they tape the racquet into the hand, which makes grip changes impossible, so one grip is selected and all shots have to be played with it! SW forehand is the best overall compromise, as it allows forehand, reverse backhand, slice backhand (with some wrist flexion) and serve to be hit relatively effectively.

Cheers

LeeD
02-21-2012, 12:41 PM
Darn.
And I actually have a bud who says he plays tennis, I've skied with him, I've also sailed with him.
He's got like 5 titanium wheelchairs for different sports, and one all around travelling wheelchair.
I actually garden for him, but don't play tennis with him.

max pl
02-21-2012, 01:21 PM
i used to serve with SW grip as well up until a year ago when I started posting here.

it just felt like the natural grip as the head of the racquet faces forward through the whole motion. i guess thats the problem with it though as thats not how the serve motion should behave, and i dont think i'll be going back to it.

although ive had more success with it than with continental, i'd much rather perfect the proper form than be a bit better with the wrong form.

r2473
02-21-2012, 01:37 PM
I'm afraid the other poster is right. The Western/SW is the frying pan grip. The Eastern is the "pancake" grip. Think about how you pick up a pan. You have your palm on the side/bottom of the grip. If you picked up a pan with an Eastern grip, your palm would be on top of the handle meaning you're putting most of the weight on your fingers rather than using your arm.

You're right.

I was thinking of the racquet face being perpendicular to the floor. But if it is starting parallel to the floor, then the "frying pan" grip is for sure the SW/Western grip (knuckle on bevel 4 or 5. Not 3).

Sorry. When I think about serving, I just assume the racquet face is perpendicular to the ground at the start. Now I get it!!! If you start with the racquet parallel to the ground, then of course you can serve with the SW grip. In fact, it feels quite "natural".

When I was messing with it, I was starting off with the racquet perpendicular and wondering how the heck you would even get your knuckle on bevel 4.

OK. Now I got it.

SStrikerR
02-21-2012, 01:41 PM
Don't matter mechanics or whatever, a SW gripped serve is for beginners playing against beginners. Once you hit 4.0 level, everyone will tee off on your serve to that side.

Okay, your point? I never said it was good, I just said that it was possible to hit, unlike what everybody here seems to think.

r2473
02-21-2012, 01:45 PM
When people say "I don't see how you hit a serve or backhand with SW grip" I don't think they're taking into consideration that obviously the person using SW isn't using normal mechanics on their stroke....

I used SW for literally everything when I first started and didn't know different grips. I'm not saying my game was good or anything (it wasn't) but it's doable, you just won't have the same mechanics.

Your point is well taken. I get it now. Duh!!!! Your racquet is rotated 90-degrees. So obvious, but it actually never even crossed my mind.

Good thing I'm not a tennis instructor. I can't get out of my own thought patterns.

LeeD
02-21-2012, 02:09 PM
SStrikerR...
The point is NOT to use a SW, unless you are a beginner!
Anyone can hit the tennis ball with the handle of the racket, holding onto the head. But would you willingly CHOOSE to play your matches that way?
I can serve "tweeners" all day, and get a fair percentage of second serves IN, but that doesn't mean it's something to be tried in a tennis set.
I have friends who actually practice the "Nastase backfire". They don't serve that way.
Useless hitting is nice for show and to impress beginners. Almost everything has been seen and tried.

SStrikerR
02-21-2012, 07:55 PM
SStrikerR...
The point is NOT to use a SW, unless you are a beginner!
Anyone can hit the tennis ball with the handle of the racket, holding onto the head. But would you willingly CHOOSE to play your matches that way?
I can serve "tweeners" all day, and get a fair percentage of second serves IN, but that doesn't mean it's something to be tried in a tennis set.
I have friends who actually practice the "Nastase backfire". They don't serve that way.
Useless hitting is nice for show and to impress beginners. Almost everything has been seen and tried.

I understand that. What I don't understand is why you aimed these posts at me, when all I said is that it's possible. I never said it was a good idea or that anybody should do it; I would never give out bad advice like that.

jb193
02-22-2012, 07:19 AM
The one good thing with this grip was that one day I was playing around with it and I just started pronating like crazy with it and really feeling that arm snap. More so than with any other grip... Of course, when I served with it, my balls hit the side fence, but the point, is that it gave me that feel to transition to my continental grip after that..

user92626
02-22-2012, 12:39 PM
How can anyone not know how to hit a ball with a conti grip? :)

Hold the racket in a conti grip, slight adjustment maybe needed and it's fine, and repeatedly pound a ball against the ground in front of you. You can hit through it or slice across it or whatever.

Now toss the ball up and hit the same way, forward. Voila, you got a correct serve! :)

Say Chi Sin Lo
02-22-2012, 01:50 PM
I think the SW/frying-pan grip serve may actually be easier on the shoulder. Because all you're doing is spiking the ball, with little to no side-to-side torque. Just an up-to-down spike.

But OP, stop using the semi-western grip for serves, it'll get you no where. Semi-western grip is only for one stroke, the forehand.

SystemicAnomaly
02-22-2012, 02:00 PM
^ That really depends on how the SW grip serve is implemented. If you keep the elbow down (and do not raise it above the shoulder level), it may be less stressful to the shoulder. However, some implementation of the SW/frying pan serve may actually be more stressful to the shoulder than a properly executed serve with a conventional grip.

In any event, as you have said, stop using the SW for serves.

Ash_Smith
02-22-2012, 10:53 PM
SW serve...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tzOVTfzQ0k

:)